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Full text of "Past to present, Elizabeth, Illinois centennial"

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INTRODUCTION 

What follows is the result of wonderful co-operation 
from many wonderful people — without whom it would 
have been impossible. 

Whenever so many people are involved; whenever a 
project reaches back so far; whenever so much depends on 
memory, there must almost necessarily be discrepancies 
and inaccuracies. 

We have done our very best to make this accurate and 
complete. We think that we have succeeded pretty well 
so that you are about to read tells it substantially "like it 
was." 

The Committee as a whole — and the members individ- 
ually — consider this appointment an honor. 

Our fond hope it that, after having finished the reading 
of this, you will feel that the confidence was well placed. 






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1908 '^^^'^^ GOING- TO 60ILD THE BAHk Hi 



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■ I I I III 



58 YEARS 

a HhfuM 

LIZABETH- ^ 




STATEMENT OF THE CONDITION OF 
THE ELIZABETH STATE BANK 



AT COMMENCEMENT OF BUSINESS DECEMBER 1, 1910 



J.BERTSCH PRESIDENT 

B. D ITT MAR P^^rpEvr 
LOIS NASH cAsw.-TR 
JOS. PR IS K cA"k^.r 



C.O.OANIEL pRESioENr 

A.M.GROEZINGER PR^ifo'km- 
C.R.DAWE CASHie^R 

CASMICR 



>d Di=counta S&5,735 W 

rand Fis'ur<">-, 10,555.08 
light Eichange. 24.6-56 4q 



,. 74,962.60 
S100,g46.6S 



5*7 YEARS LATER 0EC.3O-i9fc7 



R^¥o"clbcEs# 10,069,358. 



CAPiTAU 
FONDS 



»9S2,727. 



DEPosiTS#9,Qg6.<^3L 




THE RESOURCES 



THE ELIZABETH STATE BANK 



1818 ILLINOIS 1968 

Sesquicentennial Year 




John B. Anderson 



Map from atlas of Jo Daviess County — 1872 



Elizabeth Garage, Inc 




Jane Specht 





Jeanette Graves 
Verna Hutchison 
Bill Honeyman 
Mario Specht 
Lee Stein berger 
John Gandy 



GRAVES 



Buick 




Geo. Ortscheid 



Jack 0. Graves 

Maury Read 
Wallie Arnold 
Jerry Bausman 

Earl Donna 
Jeff Smith 
Art Krug 



Elizabeth's Oldest Dealer 



Pontiac 



1925 TO 1968 



Ph. 815-858-2230 





.ATJuAS OT ELLIXOTS 

COUNT/ES OF 

Jf> B A¥ffiS^ STEPHEMS 
CABE#JLLAM»R0Cil iSUUTO 



ILLINOIS HISTORY 

Illinois was originally a part of Florida. In 1543 it 
became a Spanish colony. Northern Illinois was included 
in the territory granted in 1620 to the Plymouth Company 
by King James, and was therefore claimed by Great Britain. 
In 1673 the Mississippi River was discovered by Marquette 
and Joliet. In the same year they ascended the Illinois 
River; and in 1679 Robert Cavalier De La Salle made further 
discoveries, descending the Kankakee to its mouth. Kaskas- 
kia and Cahokia, the oldest towns on the Mississippi River, 
were settled by the French in 1682. Illinois at this time 
contained but few white inhabitants. In 1699 it became 
a part of Louisiana, and so remained until 1763, when it 
was ceded to England. The white population now numbered 
about 3000, mostly French, the principal settlements being 
at Kaskaskia, Cahokia, Peoria, Prairie-Du-Rocher, Prairie Du 
Pont, and Fort Charters. In 1778 Kaskaskia, Cahokia and 
other settlements were captured by four companies of 
Virginians, under Colonel Clarke, and in October of the 
same year an Act was passed by the Virginia Legislature, 
establishing the "County of Illinois", which embraced all of 
Virginia northwest of the Ohio. In 1784 it was ceded by 
Virginia to the United States, and in 1787 Congress passed 
an Ordinance for the government of all territory northwest 
of the Ohio River, Arthur St. Clair being appointed first 
governor. In 1803 Indiana, including Illinois and Wiscon- 
sin, was erected into a separate territory, and six years 



later, the present State of Illinois became a territory by 
itself. In 1812 it passed from the first to the second grade 
of territorial government, and sent a delegate to Congress. 
The right of suffrage at this time extended to the people, 
without regard to property qualifications. On the 3rd of 
December, 1818, Illinois was admitted into the Union as 
a sovereign and independent State. One section of land in 
each township was at once donated for school use, and two 
townships in the State for the use of a seminary. Since that 
time, the growth of Illinois has been astonishingly rapid. 

The foreign population of Illinois was mostly comprised 
of Germans, Irish, French and Portuguese. Of the American- 
born the north part of the State is settled principally from 
New York and New England, the central from Ohio, 
Pennslyvania and Virginia, and the southern from Kentucky, 
Tennessee and the Carolinas. 

Kaskaskia was the first state capitol, in 1820 it was 
moved to Vandalia and 20 years later to Springfield. 

The Illinois and Michigan Canal between Chicago and 
LaSalle on the Illinois River was completed in 1848. The 
Illinois Central Railroad was built during the 1850s and 
other railroads were built during this same period. In 1919 
the State began its construction of highways, and in 1924 
a $100,000,000 bond issue was approved for more 
elaborate highway construction. 



CONGRATULATIONS 
ELIZABETH CENTENNIAL 




LENA PELLETS, INC 

LENA, ILLINOIS 

PIONEER FEEDS 

COMPLETE PELLETED RATIONS 
FOR LIVESTOCK and POULTRY 

PHONE 369-4564 

Area Representatives: 
EUGENE WAGNER and ALLEN BRADY 



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CONGRATULATIONS FROM 



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JOHN BACKENKELLER & SON 



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GENERAL HARDWARE & WIRING 

COMPLETE LINE OF PAINTS 
AND PAINTING SUPPLIES 

MAYTAG & HOTPOINT APPLIANCES 



GREEN COLONIAL HEATING & COOLING 



so THE STORY GOES 

I. WHEREIN ARE: THE VERY BEGINNING: THE FIRST 
WHITE MAN: THE "LEGEND": THE EARLIEST DAYS. 

News gets around 

With the vast communications networks we have now, 
it is taken for granted that news will spread almost instant- 
aneously ... a flick of the switch, and we know what 
happened a few minutes ago in the farthest corners of the 
world. Sometimes we even see them happen. For example, 
the murder of Lee Harvey Oswald by Jack Ruby. 

Things were different at the beginning of the last 
century. It took longer, but news got around just the same. 

Thus it was that A. P. Van Matre heard of the discovery 
of Indian lead mines at the Fever River (now the Galena 
River) diggings near Galena in 1818, setting in motion 
events which led to his becoming the first white man in 
the Elizabeth area. Being an adventurous soul and a 
prospector, Van AAatre set out to seek some of the wealth 
to be dug out of the ground. 

Legend has it that one day in 1 825— dispirited, fatigued, 
almost despondent— Van Matre found himself in an un- 
spoiled forest, surrounded only by majestic trees, dense 
foliage, and— to the best of his knowledge— with the 
company of only a few Indians. He was gloomily ponder- 
ing his next step, when one of those happenstances that are 
supposed to occur only in highly imaginative fiction took 
place. 

The foliage parted . . . and an Indian girl stepped into 
the clearing. History doesn't tell us how the odd couple sur- 
mounted the language barrier, but surmount it they did. 
After an exchange of amenities and some preliminary 
palaver, they got down to business. It transpired that the 
Indian girl was as interested in acquiring a mate as Van 
Matre was in acquiring lead. The girl made an offer: in 
exchange for matrimony, she would show the pale-face 
much metal, known only to her. Van Matre was in no mood 
to dicker. The bargain was struck, and the wedding held. 

True to her word, the lady led her spouse to the 
diggings. Here, on the bank of the river, he built the first 
smelting furnace in this part of the country. On the opposite 
bank he built a house. 

Van Matre lived in this house from which he worked 
until the diggings were exhausted ... a matter of about 
twelve years. 

Not for long was he alone. 

As fame of the lead mines and the beauty of the valley 
spread, settlers were attracted. Preponderantly, they were 
miners, but included among them were trappers, farmers, 
and some assorted enterprisers who saw a chance to 
establish themselves in a new community. In chronological 
order, here are some of the names that have come down 
through the years . . . 

1825 - Thaddeus Hitt who arrived in Galena the same 

year Van Matre found his mine. Hitt soon left 
for Elizabeth, where he met and married his 
Rebecca in 1 831 . 

1826 - Jefferson Clark, John McDonald, and one 

Rogers (given name unknown) who came to 
mine. Mr. McDonald put up a smelting furnace 
which he operated for many years. 

1827 - an Important year, witnessing the arrival of 

such people as: Henry Van Volkenburg, a 
trapper, hunter, and prospector, who passed 
through the area in 1827, returned to his native 
Ohio, and — liking what he had seen, returned 
to settle; John D. Winters, who settled his 
family on the Apple River . . . who, with James 
and John Flack, raised the first corn in Elizabeth 
township . . . and, with Captain Clack Stone, 
acquired the land on which Elizabeth stands; 
Nathaniel Morris, who settled with his family 
on a farm four miles northwest of Elizabeth; 



Killion & Lee, who farmed about %ths of a mile 

northeast of Elizabeth; Labaum and St. Vrain, 

who built a smelting furnace about V? mile 

northeast of Elizabeth and also opened the first 

store in the vicinity. Many of these folks played 

a major part in the early development of the 

area. 

Between this time and 1830, there was an influx of 

many men — almost all of whom had been attracted by 

the mines. The few names given above are no more than 

the core around whom matters developed. 

These were frontier days. Life was rugged, primitive, 
at times almost brutally harsh. But these were toiling, 
determined men, made of stern stuff. They persevered 
against great obstacles; they won out; and often they 
prospered as they established themselves and their families. 
(Note: The late Henry Green stated in 1875 that, up to that 
time, the output of the Elizabeth mines alone had been at 
least 75,000,000 pounds. This, we think you will agree, 
is a considerable amount of lead. Surely it gives a general 
idea.) 

By 1830 a community had begun to shape up— nebulous 
perhaps, but certainly the spirit of community was growing 
with each passing day. There was, as yet, no sign of the 
dramatic developments that lay just ahead. 
II. WHEREIN ma kat awimsheka ka LOSES HIS COOL. 

In a little Sauk village on the Rock River near the 
Mississippi, the little papoose "ma kat awimsheka ka" 
(which is Sauk of Black Sparrowhawk) had grown to man- 
hood and the status of Chief. An imposing man of majestic 
stature and mien, he was a man of violent temper. Nothing 
happened during his growing-up years to create anything 
but hatred for the white man. 

Their beautiful country had long been coveted by white 
settlers, who inflicted various indignities and abuses on the 
red men. As early as 1804, a few minor chiefs agreed to 
withdraw to the west bank of the Mississippi — in con- 
sideration of the munificent sum of $1,000 to be paid the 
group annually. There are those who question the means 
by which this lopsided treaty was obtained. 

In 1831, threats by Blackhawk to evict the usurpers by 
force caused a company of Illinois volunteers to come 
arunnin', upon which event the Sauks withdrew across the 
Mississippi, agreeing not to return without government 
permission. 

The most fundamental of human needs — plain, simple 
hunger — caused breaking of the promise. In the face of 
famine conditions — driven by the elemental and powerful 
instinct, the Sauks — men, women, children — bag and 
baggage, under the leadership of the indomitable Black- 
hawk, re-crossed the Mississippi in order to harvest what 
they could and to plant new crops. 

Instant panic hit the settlers. An undisciplined, raw, 
trigger-happy member of the militia shot and killed an 
Indian carrying a flag of truce. 

That did it for Blackhawk. His notoriously short fuse 
sputtered down until he erupted in.to a violent rage. Swear- 
ing vengeance against the treacherous pale-face for wanton 
disregard of the truce flag, he began to harry the border 
in an effort to vent his fury and to retrieve the lands he 
felt rightly belonged to his beloved people. 

While some may question Blackhawk's wisdom and 
statesmanship, none have seriously questioned the very 
real sincerity of his feeling for his territory and his people, 
and the shamefulness of the treatment accorded him and 
his followers. 

For a while he was successful. 
Ml. WHEREIN NEWS IS RECEIVED; A MEETING IS HELD; 
PREPARATIONS ARE MADE. 

Blackhawk hit viciously, mercilessly, and seemingly at 
random. Rumblings reached the Elizabeth area, but it was 



In November of 1950 Stockton Manufacturing Company (Atwoods) began its 
existence in Stockton, Illinois. Through many months of diligent effort, the leading 
Stockton citizens and company officials were able to make the 90,000 square foot 
manufacturing plant a reality. 

Stockton Manufacturing Company is a Division of Atwood Vacuum Machine 
Company of Rockford, Illinois, one of the world's leading manufacturers of auto- 
motive hardware. It employs over 400 people living in Stockton and the surrounding 
area. Its principal products are automotive seat adjusters, hood hinges, and hood 
latches which may be found on almost every make of American automobile. 

The Company is proud of its county and community and is happy to contribute 
to their continued growth, development and prosperity. 

ATWOODS SALUTES ELIZABETH 
FOR THEIR 100 YEARS OF EXISTENCE 

STOCKTON MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

Division of Atwood Vacuum Mach. Co. 

STOCKTON, ILLINOIS 








not until May of 1832 that "hard news" was received. On 
this day a rider from Dixon arrived to tell of the defeat of 
a company of whites under Major Isaiah Stillman at 
Stillman's Run; of the massacre a few days later when 
Blackhawl<'s band swooped down on a tiny settlement at 
Indian Creek; and stories of assorted murders. It became 
apparent that every living soul on the frontier was 
threatened. Riders set out to spread the word, going as 
far as Galena and Hanover. 

The widely scattered settlers hastily convened at the 
store of Labaum & St. Vrain to discuss ways and means. 

These were men of action; to decide was to do. By 
nightfall of the next day: trees had been felled and split; 
driven into the ground close together with about 12 feet 
protruding above ground — the whole encasing about 
1000 square feet; one corner forming a log house in which 
one of the settlers lived; another corner given over to a 
two-story block-house, the second story of which protruded 
about two feet in order to keep Indians from getting close 
enough to set fire to the fort; two log cabins for living 
purposes lined one side; space not otherwise occupied had 
benches on which the defendants could stand in order to 
reconnoitre; and, finally, there were strategically placed 
port-holes. 

In this prompt fashion the historic Apple River Fort 
came into being. It was placed on top of a knoll so that 
attacking Indians could find protection only on Terrapin 
Ridge — and that too far away from which to launch a 
surprise attack. A pretty good day's work. 

There remained a few more preparatory steps ... in- 
cluding the molding of bullets. This was done from lead 
furnished from the nearby smelter of the ubiquitous 
Labaum & St. Vrain. Within a few days all preparations 
were completed and the pioneers settled down to await 
hostilities — unmolested albeit impatient. They didn't have 
to wait long. 

The site of Apple River Fort is marked by a bronze 
plaque about Vi mile east of Elizabeth on Highway U. S. 
#20. 

IV. WHEREIN A GOOD TIME IS HAD BY ALL; AN ASSAULT 
IS MOUNTED; WOMEN ARE HEROIC; THE ATTACK IS 
REPULSED. 

Immediately following completion of preparations, 
there came an interlude of halcyon days, of serene and 
unruffled tranquillity. With no trouble in sight; with a deep 
sense of security; with release from hard labor in mine or 
on farm; with passing of the loneliness of the long, cold 
winter in their log cabins far removed from friends; with 
the joy of congenial human companionship, the prevailing 
spirit is reported to have been very nearly gay. It was very 
much like an extended community outing. Children played 
games, men frolicked in athletic contests, women did 
whatever it is that pleases women. 

There was even a romance culminating in the marriage 
of Jane Murdock to Jefferson Clark. To be sure, there were 
incidents: horse-stealing by Indians, murders of messengers; 
a vengeance raid under Captain J. W. Stephenson to 
neighboring Stephenson County; the wandering adventure 
of little Benny Tart which included pursuit by Indians. 

These incidents, in themselves, did not create any great 
disturbance in the fort. However, they were very real 
evidence that Indians were in the vicinity; accordingly, the 
people stayed nearby, because to scatter to their homes 
was tantamount to an invitation to disaster. 

Sunday, June 24, 1832 — Four messengers — Fred 
Dixon, G. W. Herclerode, E. Welsh, and J. Kirkpatrick — en 
route from Galena to Dixon with dispatches for General 
Atkinson, stopped by Apple River Fort for noon dinner, a 
visit, and a spot of conviviality. 

As they left the fort to continue their trip, emboldened 
perhaps by the jug and exhilarated beyond discretion, they 
were set upon by Indians. Dixon got away and continued 



his trip; Welsh, who had received a bullet in his thigh, was 
carried back to the fort by Herclerode and Kirkpatrick. 

The Sabbath silence was shattered as the landscape 
came alive with whooping, howling red men, who 
attempted to storm the fort. (It may be interesting to note 
as an indication of the spirit of the day that a group was 
about to set out on a gooseberrying party when the alarm 
was given.) 

At the moment there was a pitifully small number of 
fighting men on hand. Perhaps fifteen. Perhaps twenty. 
But there were many women and many children. The men 
jumped to their posts, determined to fight- it out against 
the great odds confronting them. G. W. Herclerode, in 
spite of many warnings and orders from Captain Clack 
Stone, persisted in indiscreetly exposing himself in order 
to get a better shot. The shot he got was an Indian arrow 
in his throat. 

As he fell Elizabeth Armstrong snatched the rifle from 
his hands, intending to do a little shooting of her own 
account. Sam Hughlett, standing nearby, suggested that 
he shoot, and she load. Using one gun, while Elizabeth 
Armstrong loaded the other, Hughlett was able to keep up 
almost steady fire. 

There were two other Elizabeths in Apple River Fort 
on this fateful Sunday — Elizabeth Van Volkenburg, and 
Elizabeth Winters. 

All the women — even 8-year old girls — performed 
valiantly . . . running pigs of lead, molding bullets, loading 
guns, and perhaps most important of all, inspiring and 
exhorting the men. 

Because of their Herculean efforts, the beleaguered few 
were able to mislead the Indians into the belief that they 
were opposed by far more men and far greater fire power 
than was the actuality — no small part of the victory. 

It really wasn't much of a fight as Indian fights go. After 
only 45 minutes, the Indians withdrew. The only white 
fatality was that of G. W. Herclerode. 

In a very real sense, the dramatic victory at Apple River 
Fort belongs to the ladies . . . bless 'em. The Galenian of 
June 25th said: ". . . God grant that America may never 
have greater cowards in her armies than the ladies in Apple 
River Fort." Their names have come down through the 
years (136 of them!) with the lustre undimmed. 

The red men weren't quite through. As a parting 
gesture they plundered, looted, damaged, or destroyed 
everything they laid their hands on. 

V, WHEREIN NORMALCY APPEARS; A SURVEY IS MADE; 
ANOTHER MEETING IS HELD; A VILLAGE IS BORN . . . AND 
CHRISTENED. 

There were no further assaults nor any further incidents. 
It may be that news of the destruction of Blackhawk's forces 
at the battle of Bad Axe River in Wisconsin had reached 
Apple River Fort. 

At any rate, by August of 1832 it was felt that the 
time had come to return home and to return to the business 
of normal living. 

Almost immediately, John Winters moved to a hill a 
little east of Elizabeth where he established a tavern, and 
from where he continued to direct the stage line. Soon 
after. Captain Clack Stone opened a store across the road. 

And so it continued 

1834: the first building was erected within what was 
to become Elizabeth, the same being a tavern operated 
by Mr. Knack; . . . 1835: a school-house built; . . . 1837: 
Bird & Gomer sawmill erected near the Apple River, sold 
to James De Graff in 1847 and transformed into a grist 
mill; ... 1 843; Robert Barker opens a general store; . . . also 
in 1843: Odd Fellows Hall pressed into use as class rooms, 
the school being inadequate for growing population; 
. . . 1844: school district organized; . . . 1856: John Eustace 
built Mitchell's Mill, now known as Elizabeth Mill; . . . 1867: 
the first blacksmith shop. 



''drive and Save 

II 



// 



CHEVROLET 




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YOUR AUTOMOTIVt HEADQUARTtRS 

II 
f^AcHSc&c^Mf CHEVY -OLDS 



PHONES ELIZABETH 858-2271 

GALENA ni-Q^b9 HIGHWAY 20 WEST 



ELIZABETH, ILLINOIS 






+Iav6 B&ew A Pa i?r in/ 
Th* frieoUJTH ^ h^APQiHess, of 

This COMIMONIT/ 




For 3£ VSARS 

FIRST 



The above paragraph does not purport in any way to 
be complete. It is simply an indication of how things were 
developing in the immediate post-war years and of the 
direction they were taking. Two very significant dates 
have been omitted because they stand by themselves. 
They are . . . 

1839 — The village of Elizabeth was surveyed, laid 
out, and platted by Charles Bennett on land owned by 
Winters and Stone. 

May 4th, 1868 — A meeting was held at the school- 
house to discuss the proposition: Should Elizabeth become 
an incorporated village? The motion, when put, was 
carried by a vote of 74 'ayes' to 32 'nays.' 

The consensus is that the name became Elizabeth 
officially in honor of one or all of the three valorous 
Elizabeths at the battle of Apple River Fort. Each of the 
ladies had her adherents, and indeed a case might be made 
for any one of them. However, since the land was owned 
by John Winters and since John Winters christened the 
new baby, in all liklihood it was his wife — Elizabeth 
Winters — who was specifically honored. 
VI. WHEREIN TIME PASSES; THINGS CHANGE; NOTE 
IS MADE OF THE PRESENT. 

We have now arrived at the date we celebrate: May 
4th, 1868 ... the official birth of Elizabeth 100 years ago. 

It is a truism that history never stops; goes on always; 
is happening now. It seems neither fitting nor proper nor, 
for that matter, possible, to give the details of those 
hundred years. By and large, they were a time of trans- 
ition; perhaps the reader noted in the 1832 - 1868 resume' 
the move away from emphasis on mining. 

As the mines played out and became unprofitable, 
which mines have a way of doing, most of the miners 
moved on to richer fields. Largely of Cornish descent, their 
places were taken by farmers of German descent who were 
able to pick up acreage at bargain prices. 

The change from an industrial economy to an agrarian 
economy has meant transformation of: 1) the landscape; 
2) the people; and 3) way of life. It has been a lovely 
change. 

Primarily this is now cattle country with properties 
running from 80 acre patches to multi-thousand acre 
Texas-style spreads. 

Our town occupies one of the most beautiful locations 
in Illinois, resting in a basin at the crest of hill-tops and, in 
turn, surrounded by other hills. Nature has been lavish in 
the gifts of beauty with which she surrounds us. We are 
grateful to our forebearers and happy with what we have 
on this 100th birthday. 

In conclusion, here are a few thumbnail sketches of 
present-day Elizabeth. 

POST OFFICE 

Elizabeth Post Office was established as Apple River 
Post Office Feb. 13, 1835 and the name was changed to 
Elizabeth Nov. 25, 1842. 

Postmasters through the years include Michael Shunk, 
appointed Feb. 13, 1835; Absolom Wilson, Jan. 19, 1836; 
James V. Campbell, August 30, 1837; John McDonald, 
April 16, 1839; Samuel Nye, Sept. 23, 1842; John D. 
Winters, June 19, 1845; William Bothwell, Jan. 29, 1846. 

Also John B. Green, May 23, 1848; Robert Barker, 
Feb. 9, 1849; Lewis C. Armstrong, Feb. 14, 1854; Abraham 
Reynolds, April 29, 1854; Joseph B. Lewis, July 13, 1855; 
Abraham Wilcox, Oct. 1, 1855; Robert Barker, March 2, 
1857; John Barker, March 12, 1861; James M. Weir, Aug. 
28, 1862; William W. McDonald, June 11, 1883; John 
Bawden, Oct. 13, 1893. 

Also William M. Perry, May 25, 1889; Marietta Bawden 
(name changed by marriage to Mrs. Marietta Bawden Lee 
March 14, 1895) Oct. 13, 1893; Albert Bray, Nov. 16, 1896; 
William Overstreet, Dec. 18, 1897; Cora A. Overstreet, 



July 24, 1899; Abraham Cox, May 14, 1902; William L. 
McKenzie, March 28, 1910; John Coveny, July 2, 1914; 
William L. McKenzie, April 13, 1922 (reappointed on May 
29, 1930.) 

Also Edmund J. Coveny, Aug. 16, 1933; Robert J. 
Ertmer, Sept. 25, 1959 and Richard C. Hazer, April 18, 
1961. 

The post office was located in the building at 202 East 
Myrtle Street for many years. On Nov. 1, 1961 the new 
building at 102 East Myrtle Street was completed. 

NEWSPAPERS 

Elizabeth's newspapers date back to the year of the 
village's incorporation, 1868, when Bowman E. Ashmore 
ran a little paper he called the Advertiser and later one 
called The Lantern. In 1888 Ashmore founded the Elizabeth 
Weekly News. He re-issued it in 1892 and it has been 
running continuously since that time. 

Another paper published in 1891 was the Elizabeth 
Bell by Ben J. Terry, who also published The Family Visitor. 
Another paper was published by a man named Smith. A 
short time later Courtland S. Gaskell came from Chicago 
and started a paper. Ashmore later bought him out. The 
Elizabeth Times was founded March 10, 1937. 

Editors and publishers of the News included Ashmore, 
Harry Wickham, Charles Walters, Mr. and Mrs. W. D. 
Harlow, T. S. Golden, Edward R. Trebon, Paul Atz, Eigle 
and Foster (Lewis Eigle later selling his share to Frank 
Foster) Leon Thamer, Elizabeth Clapp and Charles Hubbard 
(later known as Read and Read) Russell Gingles, C. V. and 
G. M. Howery, Ernest Schoenhard and J. Clinton Youle and 
Orville and Dorothy Zilly. The Zillys bought the News from 
Schoenhard and Youle in 1951. On April 15, 1957 they 
purchased the Times and suspended its publication. 

Through the years the News has had various homes, 
moving to the present location at 236-240 North Main Street 
from the ground floor of the Westphal building in 1957. 

The first linotype was purchased in 1916 as was the 
first power press, operated by gasoline engine. 

ELIZABETH TOWNSHIP 

Elizabeth township supervisors from 1882 to the present 
include George Green, L. D. Overstreet, Adam Fetz, J. C. 
McKenzie, William Hutton, J. H. Bateman, Henry Ashmore, 
Henry Ryder, R. H. Hosking, J. A. Bingham. 

Also R. H. Reed, who served from 1914 to 1935, 
William H. Tippett, who served from 1935 until his death in 
1958 and William O. Eustice, who served from 1958 to the 
present time. 

HISTORY OF BANKING IN ELIZABETH 

As early as 1885, a jewelry store was established in 
Elizabeth by Anson H. Nash. Mr. Nash sold rings and 
watches in his store and finally he purchased a large steel 
safe in which to put his valuables. The people started 
bringing their money to him, and asking him to place their 
money in his safe, because they did not want to keep 
money around their homes. In time, so much money was 
brought to Mr. Nash for safe keeping he decided to give 
the people a receipt for their money, and then put all the 
money together and start a bank in Elizabeth. At this time 
the people used bank drafts to send money from place to 
place, as no checks went through the bank. 

Mr. Nash, with the assistance of other Elizabeth men, 
established the Elizabeth Exchange Bank in 1888. This was 
a private bank and was located where Graves' used car 
lot is now. In 1914, the Exchange Bank moved into a new 
bank building which is now use as a Village Hall, and the 
Drivers' Training Office. 

The Great Western Railroad, the lead mines and farming 
around Elizabeth brought banking business to the new 
bank. The livestock industry brought business to Elizabeth 
as the area gradually changed from mining to livestock. 



BRAMMER LIVING KITCHEN CABINETS 

FOR YOUR NEW OR REMODELED KITCHEN WE INSTALL, FREE ESTIMATES 

CARPENTER WORK OUR SPECIALTY NEW OR REMODELING 

Phone: ELIZABETH (A. C. 815) 858-3324 

RUSS PEARCE CONSTRUCTION 





CONGRATULATIONS ELIZABETH 

The Heart of 
Livestock & Harvestore Country 

Curt Weaver 
HARVESTORE, INC. 

121 N. DIVISION STREET 
POLO, ILLINOIS PHONE: 946-2341 

RICHARD CURTIS 
Rockford, Illinois Phone: 815-399-3335 



At this time, everything in the Exchange Bank was done by 
pen and ink. The Exchange Bank continued to grow and 
prosper through the years. 

In 1903, Mr. A. H. Nash became ill so Lois E. Nash, his 
daughter, started working in the Exchange Bank as cashier, 
a position she held for nearly five years. She continued 
working in the Exchange Bank after her father died and 
until her mother sold her interest in the bank. 

In the spring of 1909, Miss Nash, with the assistance 
of a number of Elizabeth residents, organized the Elizabeth 
State Bank. The new bank opened on December 1, 1909, 
with a capital of $25,000. The new bank building was 
erected where the former Galbraith Hotel stood. Miss Nash 
would open the Elizabeth State Bank at 6:30 a.m. so that 
farmers could transact their business and get back home to 
work. 

The first officers of the new bank were: Jacob Bertsch, 
President; Bernard Dittmar, Vice President; John Hagie 
and William Tippett, Sr., Directors. Jacob Bertsch remained 
as President until he retired, after 26 years, in 1935. The 
other four remained on the board until their death. At this 
time, about 1912, there were no market reports available 
for cattle and hogs so the Chicago market would telegraph 
the market reports to the Elizabeth State Bank, where it 
would be placed on a large sign in the window, quoting 
the daily price for livestock. This was of great interest to 
the farmers who came to town in their Model T Fords to buy 
several weeks' supply of food, deposit cash in the bank, 
and sometimes take in the movie at the Lyric or Home 
Theatre. The banks and stores were open every evening. 

During the early days of banking in this community, 
business was conducted in a very casual manner. The 
checking system was new and a rather strange way of 
transferring money. Stock buyers found that by packing 
their saddlebags with currency and riding horseback to 
faraway places such as Rodden, Derinda, and Schapville, 
the farmers would more readily sell their hogs and cattle 
for cash. One story is told of the local banker giving the 
buyer several thousand dollars too much early in the 
morning and frantically wondering if the mistake would be 
found when the receipts were checked in that evening. 
Everything turned out all right because the stockbuyer was 
so busy buying hogs he didn't count the money until late 
in the evening to see why he had so much left. 

During the 1929-33 depression the Elizabeth Exchange 
Bank found it was getting more and more difficult for them 
to continue in business. On June 11, 1932, it was closed 
and it never opened for business again. The bank situation 
became worse and on March 4, 1933, every bank in Illinois 
was closed by a National Moratorium. Then in April the 
state of Illinois told the Elizabeth State Bank what they 
would have to do in order to open for business again. After 
they proved to be solvent, the bank opened again for busi- 
ness on May 12, 1933, under new arrangements. 

For thirty years, 1935 to 1965, C. O. Daniel successfully 
managed the affairs of the Elizabeth State Bank, building 
the resources from less than a million dollars to a total of 
eight or nine times that amount. In 1959 they celebrated 
their 50th anniversary and declared a double dividend to 
the stock holders. Plans were then made to rebuild and 
double the size of the banking quarters with the best in 
efficient bookkeeping equipment, modern furniture, and 
offices to carry on the tradition as one of Jo Daviess 
County's largest banks. Since 1965 Alvin Groezinger as 
Executive Vice President has continued building the re- 
sources into a ten million dollar institution. He has been 
ably assisted by C. R. Dawe, Cashier; Lyie Francomb, 
Assistant Cashier; Marvin Wurster, Assistant Cashier; Rita 
Francomb, Secretary and Teller; Darlene Read, Note Clerk 
and Teller; Catherine Tippett, Head Bookkeeper; Barbara 
Millerschone, Assistant Bookkeeper. 



Glancing back over the past 59 years, the history of the 
Elizabeth State Bank has been marked by a steady and 
continuous growth. There have been no mergers, but the 
bank's progress has been the result of the thrift and pros- 
perity of the community and all the surrounding territory. 
The bank has had four presidents and three cashiers in 
59 years. The present five officers have been with the bank 
a total of 168 years. The bank has always been under the 
direct charge of a board of five directors. It will be noticed 
that not only have there been relatively few changes in the 
officers and employees in 59 years, but all those engaged 
in operating the institution are home people interested in 
this business area. 

THE RAILROAD 

The railroad was completed by 1888 and the first train 
went thru. First the coaches were colorful, red with gold 
lettering and the engine had a red smoke stack. 

The railroad line was Minnesota and Northwestern 
Railroad and Chicago, St. Paul and Kansas City merged into 
one in 1887 and became known by the latter name. This 
was a name change only, as both roads were under the 
same management. Later— in 1892 the road became known 
as the Chicago Great Western. 

LIBRARY 

The first Elizabeth Library was a village project 
supported by W. P. A. (Works Progress Administration) 
funds. 

Early in the depression years, possibly 1933 or 1934, 
a representative of the W. P. A. from Rockford consulted 
various residents concerning starting a library here as a 
W. P. A. project. Among these people were Elizabeth School 
Supt. Harold Taft, Postmaster and Mrs. E. J. Coveny and 
Cora Bryson. 

The Farm Bureau had vacated the building at 200 East 
Myrtle Street and Mr. Coveny, owner, offered the use of 
a small room in the south corner of the building rent free 
for the library. 

Mrs. George (Cecil) Scott was hired as librarian with 
Miss Bryson as her assistant. When the building was again 
rented, the library was moved to a part of Mr. Taft's office 
in the school and was located there until 1946. 

On discontinuance of the W. P. A. the library continued 
to function until April 1943 only because Mrs. Scott donated 
her services, pending a vote on a proposed tax measure to 
support it as a township library. This vote passed in April 
1943 when it became a township library, however, it re- 
mained in the school until 1946. 

When the government funds for W. P. A. began to run 
out and it was rumored that the library would have to 
close, Mrs. Roy Dresser contacted the state library at 
Springfield, to see what would be done with the books 
already in the library here. She was told that if a place 
could be found for them, the library could keep them, also 
if more shelf room could be made available the local library 
could have additional W. P. A. books. 

Mrs. Dresser called a meeting of residents, including 
Township Supervisor William Tippett, Russell Gingles, 
editor of the Elizabeth Weekly News; James Coburn, 
lawyer; Joe Graham, Dr. Coleman Buford, August Berlage 
and Wayne Gustafson. Advisability of having a referendum 
to vote on a library tax was discussed and it was decided 
to ask for a tax not to exceed two mills. 

The Rev. Norman Nye, Methodist minister at that time, 
was also interested in the project and circulated the petition, 
securing the required 50 signers. This tax measure was 
voted on in April 1943. Balloting was surprisingly heavy 
due mostly to the vote on the library tax, which passed 
146-42. 

This tax was expected to bring in funds to pay the 
librarians' salary, purchase books, pay other expenses and 
provide a fund for later expansion of library facilities. 



Congratulations and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Successful Centennial Celebration 

FEED, SEED, PETROLEUM 
PLANT FOOD, STEEL, LP GAS 




Jo Daviess Service Co 

ELIZABETH, ILLINOIS 

"A FARMER OWNED COOPERATIVE" 



DON ROGERS 

Scales Mound, Illinois 
Phone: 845-2369 

EXCAVATING - TRENCHING - WELDING 

Catering To 

FARMERS - INDIVIDUAL - TOWNSHIP - COUNTY 

SATISFACTORY WORK IS OUR SPECIALTY 



Residents of the township could borrow books free of 
charge. 

At the April 1943 election members were elected to 
serve on the library board with terms of two to six years. 
Those elected were Mrs. Glenn (Dorothy) Droegmiller and 
Wayne Gustafson, two years; Joe Graham and Mrs. Cletus 
(Dorothy) Dawe, four years,- Mrs. Roy Dresser and Frank 
Tippett, six years. An organization meeting resulted in Mrs. 
Dresser being president; Mr. Tippett, vice-president; Mrs. 
Droegmiller, secretary and Mrs. Dawe treasurer. Mrs. Scott 
was hired as librarian. 

As the school needed the space occupied by the library, 
the board rented the small Goldsworthy building, located 
between the present News building and Goldsworthy 
building. This building was later razed. Some furniture, 
shelves and stoves were purchased and the library was 
moved in July 1946, remaining there until 1949 when the 
board signed a ten year lease with the Elizabeth State Bank 
for the first floor space vacated by the Ira Shaw Drug Store. 
The library was moved in October of that year. 

Mrs. Omer Beck became substitute librarian in 1957 and 
in 1958 she and Mrs. Scott divided their time on duty. Mrs. 
Scott resigned in December of that year after serving almost 
20 years. Mrs. Beck then became fulltime librarian and 
Mrs. Blanchard Menzemer was later hired as assistant. 

In June 1962, the library board was again faced with 
finding new quarters as the bank was planning to expand 
the facilities. In July of that year they purchased the Walter 
Greier building on East Myrtle Street. It was completely 
remodeled and the books and furniture were moved to the 
present location October 30-31 of that year. 

For several years the librarian had been able to order 
books not in the library from the state library at Springfield. 
Later a regional library was set up at Savanna. The local 
library could get several books at a time from this library 
and keep them for several months. This service was dis- 
continued about four years ago. 

In June 1966, the library board unanimously voted to 
join the Northern Illinois Library System and take advantage 
of the services it offers. These include monthly shipments 
of new books from the American Library, magazines, art 
prints, films, film strips and tapes for lending. Later there 
will be phonograph records for loan. 

A van comes from Rockford each Tuesday and brings 
what has been ordered from the Rockford library. If not 
available there they can get the needed item from a Chicago 
library. 

Magazine articles and other items can be (x-rayed) 
(micro-filmed) on order at Rockford and sent out for use by 
students or other residents. 

Every 10 weeks the Bookmobile visits the library and 
the librarian is allowed to choose 50 books. 

In October 1966 Mrs. Menzemer resigned as assistant 
librarian and Mrs. Roland Reynolds succeeded her. 

In April 1967 Mrs. Dawe resigned as treasurer of the 
board, after 24 years service. Mrs. Dresser, president and 
Frank Tippett, vice-president, retired as directors in 1967 
after having served in those offices since the inception of 
the library in 1943, 24 years each. Mrs. Droegmiller was 
a director from 1943-1963 and served as secretary during 
those years. 

The present president, Stanley Goldthorpe, invited Mrs. 
Dresser to be honorary president of the board. He has been 
a director since 1950. Other officers include Harry Tucker, 
vice-president, elected in 1967; Mrs. William (Irma) Eustice, 
secretary-treasurer, director since 1963; Mrs. Dawe, director 
since 1943; August Berlage, director since 1963 and Mrs. 
Frank (Dora) Tippett, elected in 1967. 



ELIZABETH BUSINESS DIRECTORY 1872 

Henry Green . . . Proprietor of Green's Furnace. 

John Goldthorpe . . . Proprietor of Union Hotel. 

B. F. Crummer . . . Physician, Surgeon and Druggist. 

E. R. Kittoe . . . Physician and Surgeon 

Weir & Marshall . . . Dealers in Hardware, Tinware and 

Farming Implements 
J. M. Weir . . . Postmaster 

Miller & Armstrong . . . Blacksmiths and Wagon Makers 
John Webber . . . Harness Maker 
John Allen . . . Miner 

D. Robinson . . . Dealer in Dry Goods and Groceries 
M. Wishon . . . Proprietor of Wishon Diggings 
Thomas Richards . . . Farmer and Miner 
George Etiing . . . Grocer 
James Eraser . . . Dealer in Dry Goods, Groceries, Hardware, 

Clothing, Boots and Shoes 
Scott & Goyen . . . Butchers and Ice Dealers 
Mrs. James Huchison . . . Dealer in Fancy Goods, Dry Goods 

and Groceries 
Dr. W. A. Little . . . State Senator 
John C. Lee . . . Architect and Contractor 
Schrade & Co. . . . Wagon Makers and General Blacksmiths 
Eby & Hefty . . . Proprietors of Elizabeth Woolen Mills 
H. Goard . . . Deputy Sheriff and Constable 
Peter Gable . . . Horse Jockey 
Wm. Avery . . . Postmaster 

VILLAGE BOARD 

Settlers were first attracted to the locality of what is now 
the village of Elizabeth in search of lead in 1825. At that 
time it was a wilderness inhabited by Indians. 

Gradually, as the fame of the lead mines spread, 
settlers flocked in and the village was founded. However, 
it was not until 1839 that the village was platted. The plat 
of the original village of Elizabeth was recorded March 26, 
1840 in the Jo Daviess county recorder's office. Some time 
after, what is known as Reynolds' addition to the village, 
was platted and surveyed and recorded June 10, 1847. But 
it was not until 1868 that the village was incorporated. On 
May 4 of that year, an election was held to decide whether 
or not to incorporate — 74 votes were cast in favor of in- 
corporation, 32 against. 

On April 18, 1884 an election was held on the question 
of incorporating under the general law. The vote was 35 
for, 45 against. Another election was held May 3, 1886 
which resulted in a vote of 60 for incorporating under 
general law and 14 against. William Perry, the clerk, was 
instructed to make the necessary reports to the county 
clerk and secretary of state. 





A. M. Groezinger 
& Son 

ELIZABETH, ILL. 

EVINRUDE MOTORS 
Vk H.P. THRU 115 H.P. 



BOATS 

ALUMA CRAFT - KENNER 

POLAR CRAFT - STAR CRAFT 



Breed's Livestock Sales 

Hogs Bought Monday Through Friday 

Livestock At Auction Every Wednesday 

Special Feeder Cattle Auction On Advertised Fridays 

COMPETITIVE MARKETING IS WISE MARKETING 

YARDS PHONE HOME 

858-3611 ELIZABETH, ILL. 858-3428 



An annual election for three trustees and a clerk of 
villages was held on the third Tuesday of April in each 
year. (Laws of 1872.) 

Early ordinances provided for impounding any animal 
running at large. 

Licenses were necessary for anyone selling, vending or 
retailing goods, wares, merchandise or other property at 
private sale or public auction. Also for exhibiting any 
show, exhibition, theatrical performance, wax figures, 
animals, puppets or feats or tricks such as circus riding or 
exhibition of like nature for profit or gain. 

A license to sell liquor cost $750 per year. Billiard, 
bagatelle, Jenny Lind and pigeon hole tables, nine or 
ten-pin alleys, shooting gallery or shuffle board were 
licensed at $20 per table or $30 if there were two. 

Dram shops were closed every Sunday, general or 
special election day or between 1 and 4 p.m. on Memorial 
or Decoration Day or between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. each day. 
The Memorial Day closing was later amended and opening 
hours were from 5 p.m. to 12 o'clock a.m. 

Every able bodied man over 21 and under 50 years of 
age was required to labor on the streets for two days of 
each year or pay a poll tax of 75 cents per day for two days 
to improve the streets. 

Persons with smallpox or other infectious diseases were 
subject to fines for going into a public place while in danger 
of transmitting the disease, as was anyone attending such a 
person without changing clothes. 

The village president, each year during May, posted 
printed notices commanding all village residents to, within 
ten days of the notice, thoroughly cleanse and purify their 
yards, barn lots, pig styes, cellars, privies, alleys and streets 
adjacent of all trash, filth, manure and other noisome sub- 
stances likely to occasion disease or prove offensive to any 
person in the village. 

Earliest village records (minutes) available begin May 
15, 1880 at which time Paul Prisk was elected president, 
T. B. Bray, Clerk and Leo Hafsig (sp), treasurer. Richard 
Gott was appointed street commissioner and constable. 

According to information given, grocery stores were 
licensed at $100 per annum. 

Labor was paid $1.00 to $1.50 per day — $2.50 with 
team. The street commissioner received $1.50 per day if he 
had five or more men helping him, $1 .25 per day if he had 
less than five men assisting. Judges of election were paid 
$1.50 and $1.00 was paid for use of the voting place. 

Early minutes indicate the trustees were elected, then 
organized, electing a president, clerk and treasurer from 
their group. The minutes of 1889 are the first to indicate 
that candidates for president, clerk and trustees appeared 
on the ballot. These were nominated at a caucus. Charles 
Banwarth was elected president with 60 votes; W. M. 
Perry, unopposed, received 118 for clerk. John Kolb with 
61 and Royal Miller and John Becker with 60 each were 
named trustees. There were six candidates for three seats. 
Holdover members were Charles Leonard, J. Meffley and H. 
Wiley. 

In 1884 it was voted to set the town constable's salary 
at $150 for the municipal year. In 1885 he was given 50 
cents per person arrested if found guilty and if the fine 
wasn't paid he was to lock him up and feed him, receiving 
25 cents per meal from the village board. 

Drug stores were required to have a permit to sell liquor 
for medicinal purposes. 

In 1886 a public well was installed at J. Meeter's corner. 
A rock crusher was purchased in 1896 for $765. 

The same year saloons were permitted to allow card 
playing on their premises for pastime but not for drinks or 
money. 

Dr. Hutton and Smith "have the privilege of erecting two 
telephones on Main Street for private use." 1899. 



Slot machines were outlawed in 1899. 

In 1888 the beer wagon was served notice not to enter 
the corporate limits with beer for delivery. 

A waterworks ordinance was passed July 1, 1903. The 
following May the following annual water rates were set: 
banks $4; bakeries and restaurants $7; barber shops, one 
chair $3; barber shops, additional chair, $1; bath tubs, 
private $1.50; bath tubs, public $4; billiard room, each 
table $2; blacksmith shops $3; building purposes, special; 
butcher shops $3; churches $3; creameries, special. 

Also cistern filled 50 barrels or less $2; each additional 
50 barrels $1; drug store $5; drug store with soda fountain 
$7; dwelling house, one family $1; dwelling house, each 
additional family $3; dwelling house with barn privilege for 
one cow or horse including washing buggies, extra $1; each 
additional cow or horse 50 cents; fountains Vs jet, flowing 
not to exceed six hours daily for season of six months $8; 
hotels not plumbed $10; hotels plumbed, special; motors, 
special; offices $3; photograph rooms $6; printing offices 
with engine $8; printing offices without engine, special. 

Stores $4; saloons $12; livery including washing rigs, 
special; schools public $10; sprinkling lawns and gardens 
from May 1 to Nov. 1 per 50 foot lot $3; each additional 
foot 4 cents; private barn, one horse or cow, including 
washing buggies $1.50; each additional horse or cow $1; 
boarding house, special; building, 1000 brick, 10 cents; 
building 1 cord stone 15 cents; building 100 square yard 
plastering 1 5 cents. 

Meter rates: 100 to 500 gallons per day per 1000 
gallons 35 cents; 500 to 2000 gallons per day per 1000 
gallons 25 cents; 2000 gallons per day or over 20 cents. 

Village officials are now elected for four year terms. The 
polls are located in the village hall. 

Present officials include Charles C. Youtzy, president; 
Lyie A. Francomb, clerk; Abe Gerlich, Frank Lieb, Irvin 
Stadel, Marvin Walker, Kenneth Williams and Jack Graves, 
trustees. Mrs. Burton (Darlene) Read is treasurer. The 
treasurer is appointed by the board. Eugene Krug is village 
police chief and Norman Kevern is village maintenance 
man. 



ELIZABETH AAASONIC LODGE 

"At a special meeting called by D. F. Lawton, grand 
lecturer of the Grand Lodge of Wisconsin, for the purpose 
of organizing Kavanaugh Lodge, at the village of Elizabeth, 
Jo Daviess County, State of Illinois, June 16, 1845. The new 
Lodge resolved that this Lodge adopt the by-laws of 
Dubuque Lodge, Dubuque, Iowa, for the government of the 




JOHN BALBACH 

WARREN, ILLINOIS 

HAL SCHAP 

ELIZABETH, ILLINOIS 

Auctioneer & Real Estate 

BROKERS & LICENSED IN 
ILLINOIS WISCONSIN IOWA 



CONGRATULATIONS TO ELIZABETH 
ON YOUR CENTENNIAL 








NADIG FUNERAL HOME 

HANOVER ELIZABETH 

PH. 591-3317 PH. 858-3317 



new lodge, and would be allowed to work under the dis- 
pensation of the Constitutional Laws and Edicts of the Grand 
Lodge of Wisconsin." The foregoing is copied from the 
original minutes of June 16, 1845. 

After the business meeting the Lodge adjourned until 
9 o'clock the next morning. The new Lodge met at 9 o'clock 
the following morning, worked till noon, met again at 1 
p.m., worked till 6, met again at 7 p.m. and worked till 
9:30 p.m. The Lodge met morning, afternoon and evening 
for six consecutive days. No mention is made of what 
building was used for this week of the beginning of 
Kavanaugh Lodge No. 36. 

At the close of this six days of Lodge meetings, a 
committee was appointed to negotiate with a certain Mr. 
Barker for the use of a suitable room and the secretary 
procure a book to record the proceedings of the lodge. It 
was resolved to meet on the first and third Saturdays of each 
month. 

As candles were the only means of illumination. Lodge 
met at six o'clock (p.m.) in all the summer months. For 
heating, the fuel bill was about $1.50 for one half cord of 
wood, 25 cents to saw it and another 25 cents to carry it 
up into the Lodge hall. 

At a special meeting June 23, 1946, called by the Grand 
Master of Illinois, this Kavanaugh Lodge surrendered to the 
Grand Lodge of Wisconsin Territory, the dispensation under 
which it had been working and come under the jurisdiction 
of the Grand Lodge of Illinois. Brother William Vance was 
to be the first master of Kavanaugh Lodge, August Mitchell 
the first senior warden, and William Warwick the first Junior 
Warden. August 1, 1846, the Lodge was meeting in the 
upper story of John Winter's store. 

Brother Wm. Bothwell was secretary and his penman- 
ship was very easy to read, and we are indebted to him for 
much of the early history of Kavanaugh Lodge. On April 1, 
1847, the Lodge room rent had been raised to $4 a month, 
and a motion was made, that a committee be appointed to 
make inquiry about building a lodge room, hire money and 
report at the next meeting. But about one month later, on 
motion, it was resolved to abandon the idea of building a 
Masonic Lodge on the stone walls. No further mention is 
made of building a lodge hall for the next twenty-two years. 
In 1850 the Lodge was paying less rent or $16.70 for a year, 
and candles for illumination were down to 12 cents a 
pound. 

Some of the Lodge expenses in 1853 were washing 
aprons 25 cents, spit boxes for lodge room 40 cents, wash- 
ing lodge room 50 cents, candles 10 cents per pound, 
snuffers 45 cents, two candlesticks 20 cents, postage for five 
letters 10 cents, and hauling stove 20 cents. 

May, 1865, the first mention of different lighting was 
when a committee was appointed to procure six lamps and 
suitable oil, for the use of the Lodge. The total cost of the 
same was $4.80. Mention is made of paying the usual 
funeral expenses of a deceased brother, said expenses to be 
$33. Also the secretary was instructed to procure a suitable 
desk for all the Lodge books and papers, the cost not to 
exceed $20. The tyler was instructed to make arrangements 
for the winter's supply of cord wood. 

November, 1867, a committee was appointed to take up 
the Lodge carpet, put fresh straw under it, and lay it down 
again. 

February, 1868, a committee of three was appointed to 
confer with a committee from the Presbyterian Church to 
consult about building a church and Masonic Hall under the 
same roof. About two months later, the committee reported 
they had not accomplished anything so the committee was 
discharged. 




"■T^ t^r';.---.- I" December, 1868, a 

motion was passed to sell 
shares to all members for the 
purpose of building a Masonic 
Hall. A committee was ap- 
pointed to draw a plan of a 
building and the probable 
cost. The new Masonic Hall 
was dedicated in 1869. It was 

a a two-story building, with a 
full basement. This was the 
■"'■^^■tJP first brick building erected in 
— ._ ,.■>. Elizabeth. About 20 years later 

other brick buildings were erected on Main Street. This 
Masonic Hall, although a century old, stands today in ex- 
cellent condition. We, today, owe a debt to our ancestors 
who built so well. The first floor of this building has 
housed a hardware store through most of these years. 

After 123 years, the present membership is around 100 
members. The present officers are James Fitzgerald, Floyd 
Wilcox, Donald Eastman, Russell Roberts, and Maurice Read. 
At the present time, Kavanaugh Lodge, No. 36, is the 
seventeenth oldest lodge in the state of Illinois. 
ELIZABETH SCHOOL 

The site of the present school, 2.53 acres, was sold to 
the school trustees for District 1, later District 36 and now 
Community Unit School District 208, by Sarah and Henry 
Green of Elizabeth for $506 on Aug. 16, 1889. 

The first building consisted of four rooms, two down- 
stairs and two up. It was first used in the fall of 1889. 
Townspeople were very angry because the grammar room 
was not used the first year or so. Approximate cost of the 
building, furnace and seats for two rooms was $8329. The 
school was heated by a wood burning furnace for which 
Dr. William Hutton furnished the wood. 

The school board for 1 889-1 900 consisted of Dr. William 
Hutton, president; Thomas Bray, clerk; and James Harkness. 

Teachers that year were Richard Rogers, principal; Ella 
M. Read, intermediate; Fannie M. Bryson, primary; Mary 
Scott, Burton. 

The first graduating class attended one full school year 
in the new building. The five members of this class, Jessie 
Eraser, Addie Wilcox, Reynolds Cox, Dora Spurrell Cox and 
Ada Sherrard Virtue, are all deceased. 

Commencement for the class of 1892 was delayed for 
a night due to the fact that several days of rain had washed 
out bridges and trains were delayed. A special train of 
delegates from the national Democratic convention in 
Chicago was stranded in Elizabeth. The town was full of 
Democrats looking for food and a place to stay. 





IB€ 

ILLINOIS BREEDING COOPERATIVES 




TECHNICIANS 

RALPH HESSELBACHER ARCHIE HENNES 

Phone: Elizabeth 858-3460 Phone: Galena 777-0239 

ROBERT AUBREY 
Phone: Stockton 947-2312 



In 1900 or 1904 (exact date unknown) the school be- 
came a four year high school. Around 1900 a west addition 
of two rooms was built with the first floor used for a pri- 
mary room and the upper room for grammar school. 

The school was partially burned during Christmas vaca- 
tion in 1912. School was conducted in the primary and 
grammar rooms, the Catholic school and Methodist Church 
until the end of the school year. 

Basketball games were played in the town hall with 
dressing rooms on either side of the stage. When the stage 
was torn down, the home town team dressed at the Catholic 
Church a block away or in the hall basement with a trap 
door as the entrance. Visiting teams used the movie pro- 
jection booth, which was reached by a ladder. Football 
games were played on the river bottom gridiron. 

In 1919 sewing and agriculture were offered for the first 
time. Cooking was added the next year. These classes met 
in the Catholic school. In 1921 the high school became a 
community high school. 




In 1926 a front addition of two rooms with renovation 
of stairs and entrances was made at an approximate cost 
of $16,000. A gym, classrooms, ofFice, library, etc., were 
added in 1930 for approximately $22,000. 

Late in 1951 Elizabeth Community Unit District No. 208 
was established and became operative July 1, 1952. It 
takes in an area of 91 square miles. 



building and connected by a hallway. The 127 x 130 foot 
brick structure includes a gym with 1100 to 1200 seating 
capacity, science lab, home economics room, clinic, admin- 
istration office, ag classroom and shop. This building was 
constructed at an approximate cost of $242,589. The school 
is equipped with a public address system. 

Four rooms were completed in 1967 for use in the 
English, mathematics, and social studies department with 
a suite of two rooms for the commercial department. In- 
cluding furnishings, the cost was approximately $75,000. 

Subjects offered include English l-IV, American History, 
World History, Algebra I and II, Geometry, College Prep 
Math., Physics, Bookkeeping, Shorthand, Office Practice, 
Typing, French I and II, General Science, Biology, Chemistry, 
Agriculture l-IV, Agricultural Occupations, Mechanical 
Drawing, Driver Training, Girls' and Boys' P.E., band and 
vocal instruction. Home Economics I and II, Homemaking 
and Family Living. 

There are 300 students enrolled in grade school and -1 1 6 
in high school. The faculty includes 25 full and part time 
instructors. Two janitors, two cooks, seven bus drivers and 
an ofFice secretary complete the staff. 

The present budget is $242,000 for education; $27,000 
for building and $25,000 for transportation. 



1 ."" 



.:^\^ 




liinrTT 




Superintendents included R. Rogers, 1888-94; O. E. 
Taylor, 1894-97; Fred H. Coombs, 1897-1900; O. S. Meyer, 
1900-02; David D. Madden, 1902-04; Loyd Engle, 1904-05; 
H. Storm, 1905-08; Clark Emry, 1908-10; E. L. Bost, 1910- 
12; R. I. Lewis, 1912-14; W. B. Storm, 1914-16; J. M. 
Guntnorp, 1916-17; Lewis Eigle, 1917-18; Lee M. Blair, 
1918-19; William Birdzell, 1919-24; A. E. Redman, 1924-26; 
R. A. Wallace, 1926-27; Harold Taft, 1927-41; Donald 
Clikeman, 1941-45; J. Howard Quick, 1945-47; A. E. 
Cockrum, 1947-50; Lewis Wainwright, 1950-51; Edward C. 
Hodge, 1951-58; Raymond I. Thom, 1958-to present. 

Present board members include Superintendent Ray- 
mond I. Thom; President Glenn Virtue; Secretary Wayne L. 
Trost; Wayne Breed, Wayne Wand, Ray Beyer, Robert Potter 
and the Rev. Raymond Rhoads. 



In 1952-54 a band room, visual aid room, lunchroom 
and balcony were added at a cost of approximately 
$60,000. On Sept. 8, 1958 contracts were signed for the 
new high school building directly behind the original 





YOUR COUNTRY COMPANIES AGENTS 
Wendell R. Keithley - Raymond H. Holland - Irvin L. Stadel 

REPRESENTING 

Country Life - Country Mutual - Country Casualty 
Mid-America Fire and Marine Insurance Companies 

212 N. Main Elizabeth, Illinois Phone: 858-2237 



L WIENEN & SONS 
Construction Co., Inc. 

AGRICULTURAL LIMESTONE 

CRUSHED ROCK - EXCAVATING 

308 South Street Galena, Illinois 

PHONE: 777-2487 



MARTHA CHAPTER, O.E.S. 

Martha Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star No. 624, was 
organized Feb. 23, 1909 with 23 members of which three 
are still living. 




Mrs. Delia Laign was the first worthy matron, Frank 
Fraser was worthy patron and A. E. Mougin, secretary. 

Present officers are Mrs. Lawrence Grebner, worthy 
matron; Lawrence Grebner, worthy patron; Mrs. Harold 
Gable, treasurer; and Mrs. Harley Breed, secretary. 

The group meets the first Friday of the month with 
special meetings called by the worthy matron. 

PATRIOTIC CIRCLE 

The Ladies Auxiliary, predecessor of the Patriotic Circle, 
was organized over 55 years ago. Exact date is not known. 
It was a branch of the Sons of Veterans. Mrs. Mamie Shaw 
was the first president. 

At an unknown date they relinquished their charter and 
organized the Patriotic Circle. At that time relationship to 
a veteran was a requisite for membership. This ruling was 
later changed and patriotism and United States citizenship 
were the requirements for membership. 




The Patriotic Circle places flowers on the unknown 
soldiers' graves at St. Mary's and Elizabeth Cemeteries each 
Memorial Day. The group was in charge of the Memorial 
Day observances for a number of years. 

Picnic tables, fireplaces, water fountain and park signs 
were placed in the city park by the Circle. They assisted in 
raising funds for the street sign fund and each year send 
gifts to Hines Hospital and to any ill serviceman from the 
area. 



At the present time there are 25 members, not all of 
whom are able to be active. 

Present officers are Mrs. William Tyson, president; Mrs. 
William Hubb Sr., vice-president; Mrs. John Gerkman, treas- 
urer; Mrs. Harry Brandt, secretary; Mrs. Frank Wilcox, 
reporter; Mrs. William Plosch, cheer committee; and Mrs. 
Floyd Eustice, chaplain. 

FARMERS COOPERATIVE CREAMERY COMPANY 

In the spring of 1914 a group of 75 farmers formed the 
Farmers Cooperative Creamery and on April 1 1 held the 
first stockholders' meeting to organize and elect a board of 
five directors. 

Elected were John F. Allen, L. H. Breed, Ed Monnier, 
Frank Becker, and Donald Bryson. Mr. Allen was chosen 
president and served in that capacity for 25 years. S. B. 
Reynolds acted as secretary while the creamery was being 
organized. 

Just prior to this time the dairy industry was going 
through a transition from the marketing of whole milk to 
that of farm-separated cream. The creamery was organized 
to provide a good market for that cream. 

Each member invested $100 representing one share of 
stock. No member was allowed to own more than one 
share of stock. (This, however, has since been changed 
when each member was given four shares of the par value 
of $25 in lieu of the one.) 

The building site was purchased from N. A. Gault. 
Steve Lane was construction engineer and Henry Goldhorn 
was the brick layer. B. F. Freeman, who assisted in design- 
ing the plant plans, was hired as the first buttermaker. 

By September the creamery was ready for operation. 
Prices paid for butterfat at its f rst pay period was 32 cents. 
The present rate (as per 1967 annual report) is 70.12 cents. 

JO DAVIESS COUNTY FARM BUREAU 

A genuine interest in farmers prompted John E. Bonnet 
of Menominee township to call a meeting of farmers at the 
court house in Galena on March 15, 1919 to consider the 
possibility of organizing a Farm Bureau. 

Mr. Bonnett was elected temporary president and Frank 
T. Sheean, a Galena lawyer, was elected temporary secre- 
tary. Membership committees were appointed and farmers 
were asked to sign pledge cards and pay a membership fee 
to the organization if and when a farm advisor was 
employed. 

The permanent organization was effected on Sept. 14, 
1919, with 376 charter members at the court house. 

The first board of directors consisted of Mr. Bonnett, 
president; F. E. Coppernoll, Stockton, vice-president; Ralph 
R. Heidenreich, Woodbine, secretary; George Curtiss, 
Stockton, treasurer; and directors, Ed Gessmer of Nora, R. 
H. Reed of Elizabeth, E. F. Hunt of Hanover, M. A. Good- 
miller of Pleasant Valley and C. A. Heller of East Dubuque. 

Leaders assisting at the organization meeting of the 
first board of directors included Albert Sheetz, Bernard 
Neuwohner, Vern D. Stock, Charles H. Keltner, Preston 
Williams, Frank Bryson, Benedict Welp, Joseph Budden and 
W. G. Curtiss. 

The village of Elizabeth was selected as the location for 
the office and C. C. Burns was hired as farm advisor. Mr. 
Burns began work in the spring of 1920. The office was 
located in the building which now houses Jo-Carroll Electric 
Cooperative Inc., at 200 East Myrtle Street. In 1933 the 
building at 218 North Main Street, now housing Tyson's 
Fashionette, was purchased and was used as Farm Bureau 
headquarters until the present structure at 212 North Main 
Street was built in 1947 and has been maintained as an 
office for the Farm Bureau, I. A. A. Insurance Service and Jo 
Daviess Service Company since that time. In 1945 the Farm 
Bureau residence at 205 West Catlin Street, now occupied 
by Sec. of Organization Don Spears, was purchased. 



44 years ago (1924) the first bushel of hybrid seed corn was sold - 
it was Pioneer. 

55 years ago (1913) the first research and breeding was begun 
on Pioneer seed corn. 

Now Pioneer has New Generation Hybrids for "Stepped Up 
Corn Yields." 

MELVIN ELLINOR, R.R. 2, Elizabeth GUS HAAS, R.R. 3, Elizabeth 

HARLAN HOWARTH, R.R. 2, Elizabeth VERLAS WOKER, R.R. 3, Stockton 




PIONEER. 

BRAND 

SEED CORN 



GERALD K. ARNOLD, Owner PHONE: 815-858-3700 




Woodbine Soil Service 

West Cherry Street at Railroad — Via Elizabeth Post Office 
WOODBINE, ILLINOIS 

DEKALB HY-SI 

SEEDS FORAGE & GRAIN IMPROVER 

LIQUID & DRY FERTILIZERS & FARM CHEMICALS 



Present board of directors of Farm Bureau included 
Ralph Tranel, East Dubuque, president; Edmund Berlage, 
Galena, vice president; Forrest Ingram, Apple River, secre- 
tary; and Kenneth AAcPeek, Stockton, treasurer. 

THE AMERICAN LEGION 

Named in memory of William H. Toms and William D. 
Reusch, who gave their lives while serving in the armed 
forces during World War 1, Toms-Reusch Post 722, The 
American Legion, was granted a temporary charter March 
25, 1921. Dr. Lewis R. May was post commander. This 
charter became permanent June 26, 1931. 

Names appearing on the charter include Frank L. Moist, 
Roy Armitage, Ross H. Logan, Edmund Coveny, Robert H. 
Martin, Elmer Lee Westphal, August F. Wand, Harley G. 
Breed, Orville J. Cox, Frank Eadie, Henry J. Meyer, George 
D. Bohm, Percy Hutchison, Dr. Lewis R. May and E. C. Bray. 

On Feb. 22, 1946, a permanent charter changing the 
Post name to Toms-Reusch-Allen Post 722, The American 
Legion, was granted. The Allen name being added in 
memory of Richard Allen, who gave his life in Africa during 
World War II. Louis H. Schumacher was commander at this 
time. 

During the years membership has ranged from 15 to 
88 persons with the present membership standing at 31 
members. Orville Streicher is present commander of the 
Post, which annually sponsors a delegate to Boys' State. 
4-H 

I Pledge: 

My Head to clearer thinking 
My Heart to greater loyalty 
My Hands to larger service 

My Health to better living for my club, my com- 
munity and my country. 

In 1922, under the supervision of M. A. Goodmiller of 
Pleasant Valley township, member of the first Farm Bureau 
board of directors, the first 4-H Club, Elizabeth Boys' Pig 
Club, was organized. In 1926, 1928, 1929 and 1935, a 
Dairy Calf Club, Nora Beef Club, Stockton Dairy Club and a 
Beef Club was organized to stimulate interest in the various 
programs. 



Jill! 




In 1929 two home economics clothing clubs were 
organized by Mrs. R. D. Morissee, Mrs. Cecil Pierce and Mrs. 
Elmer Doubler of the Stockton area. Later Mrs. Ralph Pierce 
of Stockton directed the 4-H Home Economics Clubs until the 
advisor came in 1935. 

The County 4-H shows were held in conjunction with 
the Warren Fair until 1932 when they were transferred to 
Elizabeth. In 1965 the show again was returned to Warren. 





In 1939 a County 4-H Club Federation was organized 
with officers representing both agriculture and home 
economics clubs with the purpose to increase enrollment, 
improve upon quality of work done and to combine county 
activities. 

Four-H clubs in the immediate area at this time and 
their leaders include: Betsy Junior, Mrs. Don E. Smith and 
Mrs. William Tippett; Salem Sisters, Mrs. Wayne Arnold; 
Woodbine Rangers, Floyd Lankenau and Gilbert Coppernoll; 
Top Notchers, Dick Reusch; Rush Creek Rollers, Mr. and 
Mrs. Gordon Hatfield; Rush Creek Rockettes, Mrs. Richard 
Bernhardt and Mrs. Ronald Beyer. 

ELIZABETH COMMUNITY FAIR 

First Elizabeth Community Fair was held in the city park 
in 1921 with 470 head of livestock exhibited. It was a one 
day event. 

In 1922 it was decided to combine the fair with a home- 
coming. It was planned for the evening of September 6 
and all day September 7. 

William Birdzell was chairman of the September 6 
program which included a band concert, folk dancing, 
singing and a rural playlet. 

Fair day activities began at 9 a.m. with a parade 
followed by judging during the morning. The women's 
department was housed in town hall. 



WALNUT GROVE FEEDS 

GRACE SLURRY MIX FERTILIZER 

GRACE NURISH-DRY PLOW-DOWN AND 
CORN STARTER FERTILIZER 

GREENTOWN STORAGE & DRYING BINS 





reentpwn 



BOB HARBERT 
Warren, III. 745-3614 

J. L. ISENBERGER 
Lena, III. 369-2266 



MURPHY & 
GUSTAFSON, INC 




John Deere 
Farm Equipment 



SALES 



SERVICE 



GEHL-DELAVAL-KEWANEE 



Call 

Freeport 815-233-1216 



724 Youngs Lane 



Freeport, III. 



HENRY M. HEY 
DEAN E. HEY 
JAMES O. HEY 




FARM BROKER 

EXCHANGER 

AUCTIONS 




mflKeRS OF Fine ice cRenm 



'Serving The Northern Illinois 
Area for over 60 years" 

BOX 424 
DIXON, ILLINOIS 
PHONE: 288-4242 



KENNETH MOZENA 



MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE 



REALTOR 



TRI-STATE AUCTION & REALTY SERVICE 



679 CENTRAL AVE. HOME PH. 583-7427 



DUBUQUE, IOWA OFF. PH. 583-6185 



Ribbons were awarded winners with each having a 
point value and prizes were awarded on the basis of points 
in each division. 

The afternoon was given over to speeches and other 
entertainment. 

Charles Williams was the president at this time. Vice- 
president was Donald Bryson, Elmer Westphal was secre- 
tary and A. E. McKillips was treasurer. Mrs. Frank Bryson 
was chairman of the women's department and E. June Pratt 
was secretary. 

In 1932 the county 4-H show was held in conjunction 
with the fair, which was moved to West Side Park about 
1938 and became a three day event. The fair association 
began receiving state aid in 1946. The women's depart- 
ment was then housed in the school. 

Fair days were changed to early August but were set 
for the second weekend in September in 1965. 

Officers of the Elizabeth Cohnmunity Fair Association are 
Larry Berlage, president; Lawrence Mitchell, vice-president; 
Dick Reusch, secretary-treasurer; Dr. Don E. Smith, chairman 
of concessions. Directors are Bill Sullivan, Wayne Trost, 
John Eversoll, Jim Berlage, Dick Williams, Wayman Cobine, 
Gordon Hatfield, LaVerle Streicher, Donald Hill, Ken 
Eickman, Raymond Holland, Wayne Krohmer, George 
Morhardt, Kenneth Bohnsack. 

Mrs. Charles Waser is chairman of the women's depart- 
ment and Mrs. Fred Monnier is secretary. 

BOY SCOUTS 

Troop 1, Elizabeth 8, Boy Scouts of America, included 
Hoyle Hutchison, Boyd Goldsworthy, Julian Lee, Leian Read, 
Lynn Read, Alvin Rodden, George Schmidt and Harry 
Tucker. This was in 1927. 

F. H. Tucker, H. M. McKillips and Frank Foster comprised 
the troop committee. 

In 1928 the Boy Scouts listed Hutchison, Goldsworthy, 
Schmidt, Rodden, Lee, Harvey Eraser, Myles Breed, Ray 
Jones, Harlan Breed and Clifford Jones as members. 

LaVerne Cook was Scoutmaster and the American Legion 
was the sponsor. The troop committee was made up of Asa 
Wilcox, Percy Hutchison and Ben Blewett. 

The first charter on record was received by Elizabeth 
Boy Scout Troop No. 33 in June 1936 when William H. Ake, 
pastor of the Methodist Church, served as Scoutmaster. The 
church sponsored the troop. 

Troop committee members were W. E. Fahrion, chair- 
man; H. R. Brunnemeyer and Harold Taft. 

The Scout roster included Alvin Atz, Ralph Arnold, 
Buford Beck, William Bishop, Emmett Breed, Jack Brunne- 





meyer, Warren Hopkins, Burton Read, LeVerne Rodden, 
Edgar Potratz, Marvin Schreck, Billie Wright, Wayne Wilcox, 
Howard Hopkins, Harold Young, Carlyle Hutton, Bruce 
Bryant and Keith Wilcox. 

Former Scoutmasters include William H. Ake, 1936; 
Raymond Jones, 1937; Cletus Dawe, 1939; Ernest Watson, 
1946; Theodore Elliott with Don Ruble assistant, 1947; 
Donald Paustian, 1948; Don Beck, 1952-1958; Mario 
Specht, 1958; Robert J. Ertmer, 1959; Melvin Albrecht, 
1960-61; Wallace Arnold, 1964-65; Wayne Trost, 1965 to 
present. 

The Lions Club assumed sponsorship in 1947. 

Wayne Trost became Scoutmaster in 1965 and a 
Webelos den was formed in 1965 with John Eversoll as 
leader. An Explorer troop with Robert Thomas as leader 
organized early in 1968. 

Wayne Krohmer is chairman of the troop committee 
with Eldon Heidenreich, institutional representative; Harold 
Muchow, Glen Shaw Jr., and Dr. Donald E. Smith, Com- 
mitteemen. 

Members of the troop include Terry Arnold, David 
Bishop, Gary Bishop, Lonnie Francomb, Bobby Haun, Butch 
Heidenreich, Tom Kloss, Scott Price, Jack Rife, Randy Shaw, 
Barney Smith, Ricky Tippett, Bud Trader, Bruce Trost, Stevie 
Trost, JefF Walker, Randy Walker and Herbie Wilson. 

The Explorer troop has as members Randy Krohmer, 
Steve Ehrler, Dale McCall, JefF Stadel and Gary Holland. 

JO DAVIESS SERVICE COMPANY 

First meeting of Jo Daviess Service Company was held 
April 22, 1931. 

Original directors were John Bonnet, president; Will 
Bonjour, vice-president; Charlton McFadden, secretary; Otto 
Berlage, treasurer. Directors were Walter Virtue, Louis 
Haug and George Williams. J. G. Williams was the first 
manager. 

The first annual meeting was held August 2, 1932. 
Sales were reported at $27,739.64. Total net worth was 
$13,300. 

Sales at the end of 36 years of operation in 1967 were 
$1,194,362 with state and federal taxes deducted. Total 
net worth is reported at $473,996. 

Present Jo Daviess Service Co. officers: Elmer Brunner, 
Stockton, president; Wayne Blair, Nora, vice president; Leo 
Haug, Stockton, secretary; Clifford Dittmar, Elizabeth, 
treasurer. Other members of the board include Howard 
Tranel, East Dubuque; Donald Stoewer, Galena; James 
Berlage, Elizabeth; Clifford Knapp, Stockton. Clifford Knapp 
is on the board as a representative of Farm Bureau. Marvin 
Weisert is manager. 



HOSKINS LUMBER CO. 


DEAN COUNTRY CHARM 


Elizabeth, III. Ph. 858-3414 


DEAN FOODS 00. 


Lumber & Building iVIaterials 


ICE CREAM DIVISION 




BELVIDERE, ILLINOIS 


HOSKINS LUMBER COMPANY 




WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1854, AND 


"BUY IT AT YOUR FOOD STORE" 


STILL DOING BUSINESS AS ALWAYS 




J. P. Vincent & Sons 


*Xement" 
Your Future 




... by Learning Today! 


Cemetery Memorials 


AS NEAR TO YOU 


Concrete Burial Vaults 


AS YOUR TELEPHONE 




FLYNN READY MIX 


ESTABLISHED 1884 


GALENA, ILLINOIS 




Across from the I.C. Depot 


213 N. MAIN ST. GALENA, ILL. 


PHONE: 777-9217 



HISTORY - ASCS 

The Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service 
was established in June of 1961. It administers a number 
of stabilizing and conservation programs including, Pro- 
duction Adjustment (diversion). Price Support (commodity 
loans), Conservation Program (cost-sharing to install soil & 
water retaining practices on farm land). Defense (national 
food production in case of disaster — natural or man made). 
Storage Facility Program (low interest loans to farmers for 
purchase of on-the-farm storage and grain drying equip- 
ment.) 

Before being designated as the Stabilization and Con- 
servation Service, this organization enjoyed a long history 
of service to farmers. 

The congress of the United States passed the Agri- 
cultural Adjustment Act of 1933 (Triple-A) to provide price 
support protection for farmers. Commodity loan programs 
were carried out using funds drawn on the account of the 
Commodity Credit Corporation — much the same as they 
are now being done. 

The Soil Conservation and Domestic Allotment ACT of 
1936 shifted emphasis from production controls to soil 
conservation. The Agricultural Conservation Program was 
set up at this time. 

In 1948 the organization was established as an agency 
of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

A succession of legislative acts were made in the late 
1940's thru the 1950's to support farm prices. Thru this 
period the government kept accumulating stocks of surplus 
grain. In 1960 the amount invested in surplus stocks totaled 
$6 billion dollars. 

Early in 1961 the present production adjustment pro- 
grams were established. 

Since then, the excess government owned stocks have 
virtually disappeared. 

From its inception in 1933 until the present, the activities 
of the organization have been directed by a three man 
board of locally-elected farmers, working with help pro- 
vided by the community committeemen and office staflF. 

The office has always been located in Elizabeth. Early 
records indicate that the first office was established in the 
Hutton Building in 1933. From 1935 thru 1939 the organ- 
ization used part of the Farm Bureau Building, moving then 
to the Goldthorpe Building. In 1959 the office moved to the 
present quarters at 225 North Main. 

FARMERS HATCHERY AND EXCHANGE 

Started in 1932 primarily as a hatchery. Farmers 
Hatchery and Exchange added the sale of feed to their 
line at the suggestion of the manager, James H. Eraser. 
The business was situated on North Main Street where the 
Elizabeth Garage parking lot is now located. 

John Atz was the first president with Henry Droegmiller, 
vice-president; Wesley T. Mitchell, secretary; August Berlage 
and John Allen, directors. 

In 1954 the business completed a building at 108 West 
Myrtle Street and this has been its headquarters since that 
time. 

Four managers have been employed by the hatchery. 
In addition to Mr. Eraser, they were Orville Hatton, Fred 
Monnier and the present manager, John E. Haug. 

Started with the sale of $1080 in stock in 1932, the 
business has prospered and grown through the years. 

Present directors include August Berlage, president; 
Harlan Reusch, vice-president; Charles Fahrion, secretary; 
Lawrence Mitchell and Harry Atz, members. 

JO DAVIESS COUNTY HOMEMAKERS 
EXTENSION ASSOCIATION 

In the fall of 1932 and especially during the winter and 
spring of 1935, "thrift meetings were held in Jo Daviess 



county at the Farm Bureau office, then located at the site 
of the present offices of Jo-Carroll Electric Cooperative, 
Inc., and at the homes of various women throughout the 
county. 

Lulu Black of the University of Illinois Extension Service 
conducted these meetings, teaching the women how to 
make soap, remodeling, etc., and how to utilize material 
available as it was hard to get and of a poor grade. Mary 
Louise Chase of the Extension Service, talked to the women 
about organizing a Home Bureau so they could obtain this 
information plus many more ideas. 

The county group was formed in September 1935 with 
14 units consisting of 387 members. Ethel Myers, the first 
advisor, came in October of that year. 

First county officers were Mrs. A. M. Ault of Elizabeth, 
who was succeeded by Mrs. Ralph Pierce of Stockton, when 
she moved, chairman; Mrs. Homer Curtiss of Stockton, 
vice-chairman; Mrs. Coleman Buford, Elizabeth, treasurer 
and 4-H director; Mrs. Walter Schlichting of Schapville and 




Mrs. Elmer Brown of Stockton, secretary; Mrs. H. R. 
Brunnemeyer, Elizabeth, publicity director; Mrs. Vern 
Davenport, Nora, recreation director; Mrs. R. E. Sandman, 
Hanover and Mrs. John Bonnett of East Dubuque, minor 
project directors. 

The aim of the Home Bureau (the name was changed to 
Homemakers Extension Association in the early 1960's), 
is to have every home — economically sound, mechanically 
convenient, physically healthful, morally wholesome, 
mentally stimulating, artistically satisfying, socially re- 
sponsible, spiritually inspiring — founded upon mutual 
affection and respect. (Juliet Lita Bane.) 

Home advisors have been Mrs. Ethel Myers Greenup 
1935-1941; Mrs. Eriene Barron Buford 1941-1943; 1954- 
1955; Rose M. Stubbs 1943-1944; Evelyn White Titus 1944- 
1946; Mrs. Homer Curtiss 1947-1948; Esther Sieman 1950- 
1952; Darlene Ray 1952-1953; Mrs. Donald E. Smith 1955- 
1956; Mrs. Cynthia Traughber Eustice 1956-1957; Mrs. 
Judith Kay Pierce Adams 1958-1960; Mrs. Carol Tomlinson 
Schaber 1960-1964; Mrs. Alice Williams Mayberry 1964- 
1967. 

Charter members still active include Mrs. Harold Gable 
and Mrs. Fred Monnier, Elizabeth Evening Unit; Mrs. 
William Fahrion, Mrs. Burl Reed and Mrs. Leo Kelly, 
Elizabeth Sunshine unit; Mrs. Ralph Heidenreich, Woodbine 
unit; Mrs. John Menzemer and Dorothy Parker, Warren 
unit; Mrs. Vern Davenport and Mrs. Ralph Mammoser, Nora 
unit; Mrs. Homer Curtiss, Mrs. Myron Lawfer, Mrs. Walter 
Schlichting, Mrs. H. H. Finkenbinder and Mrs. Richard 



Bader-Lankenau 
Chemical Corp. 

R. R. 2 - ELIZABETH, ILL. 




WE SUPPLY YOUR PLANT 
AND ANIMAL NUTRIENT NEEDS 



KEN'S MOBIL MILLING 

on the farm grinding, mixing, shelling 




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GEERLING FEEDS 



Elizabeth, 



Ph. 858-3748 




"O'er the green hills & through the valleys'' 
RIDE HORSEBACK 

Terrapin Riders Saddle Club 

NEW MEMBERS WELCOME 






^e 



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BLACKHAWK PRODUCTION 
CREDIT ASSOCIATION 

Serving Northwestern Illinois 
With Dependable Farm Credit 




Complete Farm Financing 

READY TO SERVE 
YOUR EVERY CREDIT NEED 

Visit the above PCA office on Highway 20 

in Stockton 

With other offices in: 

Freeport, Pecatonica, Oregon, 

Mt. Carroll, and Milledgeville 




Townsend, Stockton-Wards Grove unit. 

Area units and their chairmen are: Elizabeth Evening, 
Mrs. Lois Wills; Elizabeth Sunshine, Mrs. John Brodrecht; 
Elizabeth Rural, Mrs. Edmund Berlage; Derinda, Mrs. John 
Morrison; Woodbine, Mrs. Wayne Arnold. 

JO DAVIESS COUNTY SOIL AND 
WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT 

First meeting of the proposed Jo Daviess County Soil 
Conservation association was held Dec. 24, 1935. The 
board decided to incorporate in 1936. 

Jo Daviess County Soil Conservation District was 
organized in December of 1940. The certificate of organi- 
zation was issued by the Secretary of State in 1941. The 
original district consisted of the east portion of the county. 
In October, 1944, the remainder of the county was accepted 
into the district. 

The office was located in Stockton until July 1960 when 
it was moved to the present location at 227 North Main 
Street. 

Long time objectives of the district are to promote the 
general welfare and security within the district. Purpose 
of the district is to maintain the productivity of the soil by 
conserving and restoring soil fertility through the practical 
application of erosicn control and good land use practices. 
The overall objective of the district is the constructive use 
of the soil, water, forest, fish and wildlife resources for the 
maximum benefit to the greatest number for the longest 
time possible. 

The district sponsors an annual poster contest, an annual 
airlift and Soil Stewardship Week. 

Present directors include Lester Jones of Apple River, 
chairman; Oscar Krug, Scales Mound, vice-chairman; Harlan 
Haug, Elizabeth, secretary; Ed Hawley, Stockton, member; 
and Lee Anderson, Scales Mound, member. William Hart- 
man is soil conservationist and William Piatt is conservation 
technician. 

Past directors include Ernest Kupersmith, Otto Nagel, 
Leslie Williams, Everett Read, Carl Schnitzler, Gus Haas, 
Adam Hesselbacher, Carl Winter, Edward L. Klopf, Jr., Glen 
Wachter and George Stienstra. 

Pete E. Cooley, Julius Johnson, John Ryan, John Conroy 
and Clayton Bruce are past conservationists. Former work 
unit conservationists include Walter Brewer and Randall L. 
Nelson. 

THE NEIGHBORHOOD BOOK CLUB 

The first Book Club of Elizabeth was organized 
September 6, 1938 at the home of Cora Bryson. The first 
officers elected were Dora Mougin, president; Cora Bryson, 
vice president; and Marie Reynolds, secretary-treasurer. 

The organization was called "The Neighborhood Book 
Club", as the membership was restricted to the women of 
the neighborhood from West Catlin Street to the old 
Lutheran Church. 

So many of the members passed away so after twenty 
years the club disbanded. 

JO CARROLL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE 

It was on March 21, 1939 that Roy Rife, president, Jo 
Daviess County Farm Bureau, called a meeting to see what 
could be done about bringing electricity to the rural areas. 
It was this meeting, attended by 300 farm folks, which led 
to the organization of Jo-Carroll Electric Cooperative Inc., 
on April 7, 1939. An REA financed project, offices have 
been located at 200 East Myrtle Street since Sept. 25, 1939. 

Burl J. Reed served as coordinator. More than 700 
applications for electricity were signed in Jo Daviess and 
Carroll counties with the first request coming from J. 
Wallace and Berniece Moore of Hanover. At the time of 
organization, of 2,093 farms in Jo Daviess county only 484 
had electricity and 319 of the 1708 farms in Carroll county 
were so utilized. Today almost 100 per cent of the farms 



in the two county area have electricity. 

The first board of directors included M. S. Rogers of 
Milledgeville, president; Harry Stanger, Savanna, vice- 
president; Everett Read, Woodbine, secretary and Henry G. 
Dittmar, Elizabeth, treasurer with Mrs. J. Wallace (Berniece) 
Moore of Hanover and H. C. Hickman of Scales Mound as 
members. 

At this time it was resolved to make application to the 
government for a loan of $244,000 to be used to extend 
electric service to those persons who requested it. A con- 
tract with A. S. Shulman Electric Company was approved 
Sept. 25, 1939 to build approximately 256 miles of electric 
distribution lines to serve 600 members. 

F. I. Ruble was appointed manager Sept. 28, 1939 to 
succeed Mr. Reed and served in this capacity until March 
1948 when he became manager of Illinois Valley Electric 
Cooperative at Princeton. He was succeeded by Charles 
Youtzy, who had joined the cooperative as a lineman in 
May 1943. 

The cooperative purchased its own generating units 
May 11, 1940 with Clyde Mizell as the first operator. Ap- 
proximately 147 members received service the first week. 
Average consumption was A7 kwh per month per member. 
It now averages 800 kwh. 

The generating units were operated until March 1943 
when energy was purchased from Interstate Power 
Company. In November 1948 Dairyland Power Cooper- 
ative began providing energy for Jo-Carroll. 

At the present time Jo-Carroll Electric Cooperative. 
Inc., has 2230 members. 762 mile of line serves these 
members in the two county area. 

The present board includes Harry Hall of Mt. Carroll, 
president; Ted Storm of Mt. Carroll, vice-president; William 
Janssen, Chadwick, secretary; Morris W. Birkbeck, Galena, 
treasurer. Gotthilf Haas, Elizabeth; Ward Oangel, Savanna; 
Victor Ricke, East Dubuque; Roy Virtue, Hanover and 
Everett R. Read of Woodbine are directors. Mr. Read has 
served on the board for 26 years. 

BETWEEN THE BOOKENDS BOOK CLUB 

Between the Bookends Book Club was organized in 
1940 by a group of women seeking a greater knowledge 
of literature and arts. The name was suggested by Mrs. 
Leian Read from the name of a syndicated, column by Carl 
Sandburg. 




First officers were Mrs. Glenn Droegmiller, president; 
Mrs. Harold Olson, vice-president; and Mrs. Homer Kear- 
naghan, secretary-treasurer. 



SOUTH WIND FARM 

"Home of Quality Angus'' 
Breeding Stock For Sale 

THE SMITHS' ALWAYS WELCOME VISITORS 

2 Miles South of Rte. 20 on Rte. 84 

Don & Jeanne GeofF & Janet 
Hanover, III. Elizabeth, III. 

BOTH PHONES ELIZABETH 

858-3300 858-2022 


V. F. W. CLUB 

Barryman — Doran — Bam Bridge 

POST 5300 

PHONE: 591-3711 

OPEN TO PUBLIC TUES. thru SAT. 
3:00 P.M. TO CLOSING 
SUNDAY 12:00 - 6:00 

AIR CONDITIONED 

CLUB ROOM AVAILABLE FOR 
PUBLIC OR PRIVATE PARTIES 

HANOVER, ILLINOIS 


JO DAVIESS COUNTY 

SOIL AND WATER 

CONSERVATION DISTRICT 

Organized 1941 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

BERLAGE 
Plumbing & Heating 

ELIZABETH, ILLINOIS 
PHONE: 858-3758 

PUMPS 

WATER SYSTEMS 

AMERICAN STANDARD 

HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING 


^S;^*^ 


TSS^V^^ ^^ 


= OUR SOIL -k OUR STRENGTH = 

Lester Jones— Chairman 
Oscar Krug— Vice-chairman 
Harlan Haug— Secretary-Treasurer 
EcJ Hawley— Member 
Lee AncJerson— Member 



Charter members still active in the group include Mrs. 
Droegmiller, Mrs. Glenn Gill, Mrs. Fred Monnier, Mrs. 
Harold Gable and Mrs. Frank Tippett. 

Present officers are Mrs. Winston Schaber, president; 
Mrs. Wayne Breed, vice-president and Mrs. Wm. Eustice, 
secretary-treasurer. 

Membership is limited to 20 women. Meetings are held 
the fourth Thursday of the month with the exception of 
December. A guest night is held in June and again in 
October when members of the faculty and wives of the 
male members are guests. There are no dues. In November 
each member contributes a dollar to be sent to Dixon State 
School for Christmas. 



ELIZABETH LIONS CLUB 

Elizabeth Lions Club received the charter in April 1945. 

Present officers include Eldon Heidenreich, president; 
Charles Niemeyer, first vice-president; Harold Muchow, 
second vice-president and William O. Eustice, secretary- 
treasurer. 




Charter members still active in the organization include 
August Berlage, C. O. Daniel, Cletus Dawe, Stanley Gold- 
thorpe and Dr. M. I. Trader. 

Projects and activities of the club include sponsorship 
of Halloween and Christmas parties for youngsters of the 
community, support the Hadley School for the Blind, spon- 
sor a delegate to Boys' State, sponsor the fair parade and 
athletic banquet and are responsible for the Christmas 
street decorations. 



MUSIC BOOSTERS CLUB 

Elizabeth Band Mothers' Club, as it was originally 
known, was organized May 25, 1953. Original officers 
were Mrs. Sherman (Clara) Arnold, president; Mrs. Cletus 
Dawe, vice-president; Mrs. Arthur Albrecht, secretary, and 
Mrs. John Schwirtz, treasurer. 

The name was changed to Elizabeth Music Boosters 
Club in September 1965 with a revised set of by-laws, to 
encompass the entire school music department instead of 
just the band. 

The club has raised money through various endeavors 
to purchase band and majorette uniforms, instruments and 
insurance for the instruments, pins and trophies for the 
students, an American flag, choral risers, sweaters for band 
members, paying for bus drivers, gas and oil for travel to 
contests, etc., sending several students to summer music 
camp, paying for gifts for the variety show king and queen, 
etc. 



Present officers include Mrs. Wallace Arnold, president; 
Mrs. Harlan Howarth, vice-president; Mrs. Irwin Bishop, 
secretary; and Mrs. Glen Albrecht, treasurer. 

ELIZABETH GIRL SCOUTS 

Girl Scouting was first introduced in Elizabeth in 1954 
when Mrs. Walter Greier organized two Brownie Girl Scout 
Troops. Troop -54 was led by Mrs. LeRoy Groezinger and 
Mrs. William Hubb, Jr. with 13 girls registered. Mrs. Ray 
Bauer and Mrs. Gordon Hatfield were leaders of Troop 
#114 with 11 girls registered. The following year, 1955, 
the first Intermediate Girl Scout Troop was organized with 
Mrs. Arthur Snyder and Mrs. Sherman Arnold as leaders. 
The following information about the organization of that 
troop is related by Mrs. Snyder: 

In 1955 the girls that were Brownies joined the first 
Girl Scout Troop (Troop No. 1 1 1 ) of Elizabeth. They 
were Judith Honeyman, Toni Tucker, Bernice Lieb, 
Carol Greier, Sharon Snyder, Carolyn Kuhse, Rose- 
mary Kuhse, Reva Heidenreich, Esther Heidenreich, 
Bonnie Wills, Mary Margaret Rife, Betty Martin and 
Linda Buck. We held our meetings first at the girls' 
parents homes. Later on Heidenreich's basement 
was our Scout meeting place. The girls sold 
Christmas and occasion cards to earn money to buy 
their Girl Scout uniforms. They helped to start the 
Girl Scout Camp at Hanover (Camp Far Horizons) by 
selling Girl Scout cookies. The girls took part in 
Memorial parades, and one year took a prize for 
their float in the Elizabeth parade. 
In the following years many other Brownie and Inter- 
mediate Troops were organized as Elizabeth's history 
marched on. 




In 1964 the Girl Scouts went from three levels of Girl 
Scouting (Brownie, Intermediate and Senior) to four levels 
(Brownies, Juniors, Cadettes, and Seniors) and a Junior 
troop and Cadette troop were organized. Elizabeth has 
never had a Senior Girl Scout troop. 

The Girl Scout Council ofRce is located at Freeport, 
Illinois. It was first called the Freeport Council, then the 
Jane Addams Council, and finally the present Green Hills 
Council of Girl Scouts. 

In checking back old records we found that 53 adults 
have helped with Girl Scouts in the past 14 years working 
as leaders, assistant leaders and troop committee members. 
Women who have served as leaders for more than five 
years include Mrs. Arthur Snyder (five years as Intermediate 
Girl Scout leader), Mrs. Charles Potter (six years as Brownie 
and Junior Girl Scout leader), and Mrs. Gerald Bausman 
(eight years as Brownie, Intermediate, and Cadette leader.) 
There have been about 125 girls who have registered as 
Girl Scouts at some level of Scouting in the 14 years' history 



ELIZABETH 

WEEKLY 

NEWS 


A toast to 
A CENTURY OF PROGRESS 

of one of the 

GREATEST COMMUNITIES 

in the 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

DANIEL INSURANCE AGENCY 

"Complete insurance Service" 
ELIZABETH, ILLINOIS 


'pox pMce^ VitUtt^ 
/it ^tA 'pitted 

J. & M. 

CAFK 

HOMEAAADE PIES & ROLLS 

2 Miles East of Elizabeth 
On U.S. 20 

OPEN DAILY 7 A.M. -10 P.M. 
Wayne & Joyce Krohmer 


BREED'S ELECTRIC SERVICE 

L.P. Bulk & Cylinder 
Gas Service 

Electric & 
Gas Appliances 

Phone: 858-3714 
ELIZABETH, ILLINOIS 



of Girl Scouting in Elizabeth. Many of these girls remained 
in Scouting from the time they registered as Brownies (2nd 
grade) until they reached high school. 

In 1912 Mrs. Juliette Low of Savannah, Georgia, began 
the first Girl Scout troop in the United States. In 1962 the 
Elizabeth Girl Scouts helped celebrate the 50th anniversary 
of the organization at the annual family night dinner in 
March. They also entered a golden anniversary float in the 
annual Elizabeth Fair parade in August of 1962. 

Brownie leaders at the present time are Mrs. Delos 
Groezinger, Mrs. Eugene Ertmer, Mrs. Glen Shaw, Jr., and 
Mrs. Marvin Weisert. 

TERRAPIN RIDERS SADDLE CLUB 

William Hutton, now of Comanche, la., and Marvin 
Koester organized the Terrapin Riders Saddle Club in T954 
with Koester as the first president; Hutton as vice-president 
and Barbara Weede (now Mrs. Richard Grabbe) as secretary. 
There were 25 members. 



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At the present time there are 63 paid members. The 
club is a member of the Mississippi Valley Riders Associ- 
ation and Northern Illinois-Southern Wisconsin Trail Riders 
Association. In 1965, the latter organization held its four 
day trail ride here with headquarters in West Side Park. 
Due to the friendliness of the people of the community the 
group voted to return in 1966 for the annual four day ride, 
again headquarters in West Side Park. 

Each year the club sponsors two association-approved 
shows and at least one trail ride. During the past year the 
club sponsored a member, Joanne Fischer, in the Miss 
Winnebago County Stampede contest. After winning this 
title, Joanne participated in the Miss Rodeo America contest 
in Las Vegas, Nev., as Miss Rodeo Illinois. 

Current officers of the club are Don Buyers, president; 
Mrs. Kenneth (Elmeda) Bohnsack, vice-president; Mrs. Jim 
(Pat) Brown, secretary; Jane Mitchell, treasurer and Sandy 
Handel, reporter. Directors are Johnie Reusch, Bill Rayhorn 
and Jack Pasco. 

CUB SCOUTS 

Elizabeth Cub Scout Pack 233 received its charter 
May 9, 1956. Cletus R. Dawe was cubmaster. 

Den mothers were Mrs. Vernon Youtzy, Mrs. John 
Chiaverina, Mrs. Burton Read and Mrs. Ted AAatthews. 

The troop committee was comprised of Burton Read, 
chairman; Vernon Youtzy, Claude Nardin and Harry Ehrler. 

First Cubs were Frank Harold, James Youtzy, George 
Nardin, Craig Zilly, Larry Youtzy, Stuart McCall, David Read, 
David and Danny Chapin, Pat Gilmore, Chris Chiaverina, 
Dennis Read, Terry Lee, Frank Schwirtz, Steve Klepack. 

Also Joel Coleman, William Stanley, Greg Klopf, Teddy 



Matthews, Roby Dawe, Tom Ertmer, Robert Schleuning, Pat 
and Robert Madigan, Ronald Knauer and Brad Albrecht. 

Raymond Holland succeeded Dawe as cubmaster in 
1961. 

During the years the Cubs had a number of civic projects 
including placement of trash cans in the business district. 
Shortly before Christmas each year, they sponsor a fund 
raising project with the proceeds going to the Cub Scouts 
at Dixon State School. 

Present den mothers are Mrs. Wallace Arnold, Mrs. John 




Eversoll and Mrs. Robert Potter. 

Present Cubs include Kevin Rury, Scott Eversoll, Kevin 
Holland, Albert Haring, Lew Groezinger, Duane Potter, 
Rusty Tippett, Steve Haun, Dickie Haas, Norman Scott 
Arnold, Tommy Tippett, Ben Wagner, Johnny Krohmer, 
Mike Tippett, Randy Ertmer, Billy Ertmer, Steve Roberts, Pat 
Francomb, Johnny Groezinger, Danny Pat Walker, Mark 
Brown, Steve Fischer, Jay Graves and Dennis Madigan. 

ELIZABETH DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION 

It was on Nov. 11, 1958 that John Gerkman called a 
meeting of interested citizens to form a general not-for- 
profit corporation with the main purpose of erecting a 
modern medical center for Elizabeth. A charter was granted 
by the state Dec. 2, 1958. 

First board of directors, elected Dec. 5, 1958, included 
Mr. Gerkman, president; Gotthilf Hass, treasurer; Edward 
Klopf, secretary; Leonhart Atz, John Krohmer and Thurman 
McCoy, directors. 

John Alsip, manager of Jo Daviess Service Company 
at that time, was instrumental in having personnel of the 
Sears Foundation in Chicago present and assist with the 
organization. 

The building site at 204 Vine Street was purchased 
Dec. 6, 1958 with construction to begin immediately. 

Dr. Hans Schlecht, who came to Elizabeth in November 
1958, rented the office of the late Dr. E. J. Wiley until the 
new building was available. He moved to the medical center 
July 1, 1959 and remained there until Feb. 1, 1963. 

Dr. Delbert Williams Jr., and Dr. Lyie Rachuy of Stockton 
rented the building through May of that year after which 
time the building remained vacant until July 1, 1966 when 
it was rented to Jo Daviess Educational Center. 

Thurman McCoy succeeded Mr. Gerkman as president 
at his death in 1965. 

ELIZABETH NURSING HOME 

Elizabeth Lions Club, at a monthly meeting during the 
winter of 1965, discussed a need for a modern nursing 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Freeport Journal-Standard 

(Established 1847) 



"Serving Northwestern Illinois' 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

NACK, RICHARDSON & NACK 

Attorneys At Law 

Elizabeth State Bank Building 
ELIZABETH, ILLINOIS 



Louis A. Nack, Sr. 
James W. Richardson 
Louis A. Nack, Jr. 



TRI STATE TOURS 

GALENA, ILLINOIS 

Special Charter Buses 
for all occasions 

29 to 46 Passengers 

Restroom Equipped 

Fully Escorted Tours 

1 Day or 1 Week 

Phone: 815-777-0820 



tK 



^oX^^ 



Woodbine 

^ fire Insurance Qq 

Elizabeth, III. 



'^Po, 



^'Serving the Community 
Since 1874'' 

JOSEPH HAAS - President 

VELDA KROHMER - Sec.-Treas. 

Fred Huttenlocher Fred Klopf 

Donald Hughes Raymond Bleakley 

Charles Fahrion Earl Meyer 

JOHN KROHMER - Agent 




home to care for people of all ages in the county. 

A committee comprised of Stanley Goldthorpe, E. V. 
Lunning, Jack Schwirtz and C. R. Dawe was appointed to 
look into the possibilities. One year later, on April 1, 1966, 
a charter was issued by the Secretary of State to the 
Elizabeth Nursing Home Corporation and plans were made 
with the Department of Health at Springfield to build the 
home with the most efficient layout possible for the care 
of 49 residents. 

A total of 25 local people invested their money and over 
125 people responded with loans to the corporation to 
finance the project. 

At this time the building has been completed, staffed 
and operating and is a most welcome addition to this 
thriving community. 

JO DAVIESS EDUCATIONAL CENTER 

Jo Daviess Educational Center (Project for the Advance- 
ment of Creativity in Education) was established at 204 
Vine Street in August 1966. 




The staff includes Albert Tucker, director; Mrs. Carl 
Schwerdtfeger, office secretary; Hildegarde Staack, reading 
specialist; Dr. Dorothy Mutimer, psychologist; Michael Flick 
and Mrs. Darlene Ray, counselors; and Cherryll Gaffney, 
speech therapist. 

Raymond I. Thom, superintendent of Elizabeth schools, 
is chairman of the committee comprised of the superin- 
tendents of the county's seven community unit schools. 

Under Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Educa- 
tion Act, the project is financed by a direct grant to provide 
supplementary services and personnel to aid teachers in all 
areas of learning with special emphasis on reading. 

Major objectives are to identify and locate the student 
with learning difficulties and to correct these difficulties. 

Guidance and counselling are being added since the 
program originally set up. Some of the services will be 
assumed by the special education classes which becomes 
mandatory July 1, 1969. 



ELIZABETH STAMP CLUB 

February 11, 1967 was the organization date of the 
Elizabeth Stamp Club. Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Gill are the 
counselors. Mr. Gill is a member of the National Federation 
of Stamp Clubs. Purpose of the club is the promotion of 
philately. 




Charter members include Ann Bausman, Gary Holland, 
Jim Howarth, Jerry Murray, Nancy Philpot and Barney 
Smith. There are 16 members at present. Members must 
be in fifth grade or older. 

The club meets the second Saturday night of each month 
during the school year in the homes of the members. 
Projects include the exchange and selling of stamps, reports 
on various phases of stamp collecting, viewing films con- 
cerning history of stamps, participating in games concerning 
stamps and guest night. Future plans include a proposed 
trip to a large stamp department. 

Present members include Terry Arnold, Ann Bausman, 
David Bishop, Gary Bishop, Steve Ehrler, Jennifer Graves, 
Gary Holland, Jim Howarth, Lewis (Butch) Heidenreich, 
Jerry Kristan, Jerry Murray, Keith Morhardt, Barney Smith, 
Bruce Trost, Steve Trost, Barbara Wubbel and John Wubbel. 



ELIZABETH COMMUNITY BOOSTERS CLUB 

Elizabeth Community Boosters Club was organized 
March 3, 1967. 

Officers chosen were Mrs. Orville W. Zilly, president; 
Stanley Goldthorpe, vice-president and Mrs. Wallace Arnold, 
secretary-treasurer. 

Membership is open to anyone interested in furthering 
the interests of the community. Meetings are held the 
fourth Friday of the month in the Farm Bureau Hall. 

The group sponsored a sing-along and rummage and 
bake sale during the year and Installed red cedar flower 
boxes in the business district. A memorial fund for business 
and professional people was created. Through the business 
and professional committee, several sidewalk sales were 
successfully executed. The industrial committee conducted 
a survey of the area and efforts are being made to interest 
small industry in locating in Elizabeth. 

Present officers of the organization are Harold Muchow, 
president; Irvin Stadel, vice-president and W. O. Eustice, 
secretary-treasurer. 



SOUTHSIDE TAP & CAFE 

Scales Mound 
Mernice & Bernice 


DR. R. C. HESSENIUS 

Optometrist 

128 W. Front St. 

STOCKTON, ILLINOIS 

TUE. & FRI. 8:30-5:00 947-2424 


Flamingo Catering Service 

Weddings — Meetings & Parties 
Phone: 845-2218 Scales Mound, III. 


BEST WISHES FROM 

DR. L A. RACHUY 
DR. D. O. WILLIAMS, JR. 

Stockton, Illinois 


Collier's Music Store, Inc. 

21 E. Stephenson St. 

232-5215 Freeport, III. 

EVERYTHING MUSICAL 


STOCKTON ROYAL BLUE 

Friendly, Courteous Service 
Plus S & H Green Stamps 


UNION DAIRY FARMS 

FREEPORT, ILLINOIS 
Mfrs. Quality Ice Cream 

Sold Locally at Klepecks Mobil Service 


ROBERT H. BAUER 

Realtor & Insurance 

Ralph Richtemeyer, Repr. 
Bart Brandt, Repr. 
Wayne Evans, Repr. 

STOCKTON, ILLINOIS 



TERRAPIN TWIRLERS 



ELIZABETH BUSINESS DIRECTORY - 1915 



Terrapin Twirlers, Elizabeth's square dancers, began 
classes in October 1967. 

The group held an organization meeting in December 
1967 with Mr. and Mrs. Glen Shaw Jr., president; Mr. and 
Mrs. Don Spears, vice-president; Mr. and Mrs. Eugene 
Ertmer, secretary-treasurer; and Mr. and Mrs. David Holland, 
calling committee. 



CENTENNIAL BELLES 








m 




President, Mrs. Marvin Walker; Vice President, Mrs. 
Edmund Fischer; Secretary, Mrs. John Chiaverina; Treasurer, 
Mrs. Wayne Trost. 



BROTHERS OF THE BRUSH 

President, Dale Roberts; Vice President, Wayne Trost; 
Secretary, Stanley Bankenkeller; Treasurer, Ronald Walters. 



CENTENNIAL COMMITTEE 

President, John Eversoll; Vice President, Glen Shaw Jr.; 
Secretary, Mrs. John Eversoll; Treasurer, Mrs. Lloyd McCall. 



BETSY MAIDS 

The Betsy Maids, a women's singing group, was 
organized early in 1968 with membership open to anyone 
interested in singing. 

Present members include Mrs. James Brown, Mrs. 
Gerald Ertmer, Mrs. Wm. Keyes, Mrs. Raymond Thorn, 
accompanist; Mrs. Jack White, Mrs. John Millershone, Alma 
and Lucille Becker, Mrs. Glenn Gill, Mrs. Everette Lunning, 
Mrs. Gary Walters, Mrs. Ronald Walters, Mary Ann Willis, 
Mrs. Abe Gerlich, Mrs. Frank Lieb and Mrs. James Young. 



Banwarth & Son— Furniture and Funeral Directors 

Bray & Goldsworthy— Confectionary & Bakery 

Hagie Bros— Clothing 

John Coveny— Lumber 

W. G. Read-Hardware 

A. L. Cox— Confectionary 

State Bank— Banking 

I. E. Shaw— Drugs & Jewelry 

Exchange Bank— Banking 

Dawe's Garage— Auto Repairs 

Elizabeth News— Printing 

Elizabeth Garage— Auto Repairs 

McKillips Bros.— Automobiles 

W. J. Menzemer— Farm Machinery 

Have you tried that Butter Nut Bread at Bray & Golds- 
worthys? 

You can buy a new Studebaker Roadster for $985. 




DOUG'S BARBER SHOP 

Open Tues. through Sat. 
Friday Evenings 

STOCKTON, ILLINOIS 


K. & S. FARM SERVICE 

Stockton, Illinois 

chemicals — Solutions 

AGRICO 

Fertilizers BULK 
BAG 


STOCKTON SAUSAGE & 
PROCESSING CO. 

Phone: 947-2614 Stockton, III. 

CUSTOM BUTCHERING - HICKORY SMOKED HAM 

LARD RENDERING - BACON AND SAUSAGE 

BEEF QUARTERS FOR YOUR FREEZER 

DEALER IN RATH FEEDS 


Serving Fine Food and Cocktails 

HANDEL'S STEAK HOUSE 

Ridge Road — 6 Miles North of Savanna, Illinois 
Phone: 273-2098 

Serving Food Sundays 
Tuesday thru Saturday Noon until 10:30 P.M. 
5 P.M. until 10:30 P.M. Closed Mondays 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

MONTGOMERY WARD 

20 E. Stephenson St. 
Freeport, Illinois 


STOCKTON SUPER VALU 
Stockton 947-3318 


DR. WILLIAM GOLDEN 

Optometrist 

Galena - Elizabeth 


LESSONS - FIRING - GREENWARE - GIFTS - PAINTS 

WRIGHT'S CERAMICS 

421 N. Stockton Street 
STOCKTON, ILLINOIS 

Audrey & Orie 815-947-3652 



GOLD STAR MEN 

These two pages are dedicated to all those men and 
women who served in the armed forces over the years and 
especially to those who gave their lives in World War I and 
II. Due to the unavailability of a complete list of men and 
women who served we are limiting it to the Gold Star 
Men of the Elizabeth area. 



* 




Private John Kellar entered 
the army in May, 1918, and 
was killed in November, 1918, 
several days after the Armi- 
stice. John was the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Barthel Kellar who 
resided in the Bethel area for 
many years. 




Pvt. William H. Toms-Born 
January 28, 1 897-Enlisted in 
the Field Artillery, Battery B. 
on October 29, 1917-Died of 
pneumonia Jan. 4, 1918 at 
Fort Sill, Okla. He was a son 
of the late Mr. and Mrs. 
William H. Toms, Sr. 




Corp. Clement Raymond 
Steele— Born in 1896— Entered 
the service Oct. 5, 1917. He 
was killed in action Oct. 15, 
1918 and was a son of the 
late Mr. and Mrs. George E. 
Steele. 




Private James R. Kennedy 
was born May 2, 1890, the 
son of John and Elizabeth 
Kennedy of Elizabeth Town- 
ship. Private Kennedy enlisted 
on July 6, 1917, at Fort 
Harrison, Helena, Montana. He 
sailed for France in October 
1917 and on July 18, 1918 
he was reported missing in 
action. He was later reported 
dead, manner of death un- 
determined. 




Pvt. Richard C. Allen - 
Born Sept. 4,1915 - Entered 
service July, 1941. He was 
killed in action April, 1943. 
He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. 
John Allen. 




Pvt. William D. Reusch — 
Born July 5, 1895 - Entered 
the service May 25, 1918, at 
Camp Gordon, Atlanta, Ga. 
While in France on his way to 
the front he contracted 
measles which developed into 
pneumonia. He died Aug. 3 1 , 
1918. He was a son of the late 
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Reusch. 




StafF Sgt. Leiand "Bill" 
Kuhn - Born Dec. 6, 1920 - 
Entered service Nov. 3, 1942 
at Camp Grant. He was killed 
in action in England Dec. 19, 
1943. Mr. and Mrs. George 
Kuhn of Elizabeth are his 
parents. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

HANOVER SPEED WASH 
& 

ELIZABETH CLEANERS 

Larry Eastman & Ron Petesch 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

HELEN'S SHOPPE 
Stockton, Illinois 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

RINGER'S JEWELRY 

Since 1913 - Freeport's Oldest 

& Finest Jewelry Store 

2 East Stephenson Street 

HAROLD WITTE, Owner 

Freeport, Illinois 


STOCKTON HARDWARE 

PLUMBING - HEATING & APPLIANCES 

STAN FISCHER 

Stockton, III. Phone: 947-3711 


Founded in 1870 by John Hagie 

Shoes & Dry Goods 
MAUDE B. HAGIE 


DEL KERN 
STATE FARM INSURANCE 

ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT 
INSURANCE IS STATE FARM 


HAFFELE DRUG STORE 

Walgreen Drug Store 

DRUGS WITH A REPUTATION 
Stockton, III. Phone: 947-3411 


GLENDALE FARM 

Registered Guernsey Cattle 

Ray Heidenreich & Son 

STOCKTON, ILLINOIS 

'/2 Mile South & 1 Mile East of Woodbine 




Private Anthony Alvin 
Klepack - Born March 22, 
1921 — Entered service in 
Nov., 1942. He v^^as killed in 
action in France Aug. 10, 
1944. He was a son of the 
late Mr. and Mrs. Stephan J. 
Klepack. 



giik 




ARM 2 c Coleman F. 
Baumgartner — Born Feb. 25, 
1923 - Entered the Navy 
Aug. 1 1, 1941. He was re- 
ported missing on a routine 
flight over Atlantic Aug. 7, 
1945. He was the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. William Baumgartner 
of Elizabeth. 




Private First Class Robert 
Franklin Holcombe Jr. was 
born April 30, 1922, the son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hol- 
combe Sr. He enlisted June 22, 
1942 at Leavenworth, Kansas. 
He served as a paratrooper 
with the 509 Battallion. He 
died while in the European 
Area on January 27, 1945. 



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x<?.|\ 



S-Sgt. Harvey L. Hoppe — 
Born on March 30, 1915. He 
enlisted at Ft. Des Moines, la. 
on Nov. 27, 1937. He went 
down in a B-29 bomber "Down 
Wind" off the shore of Aden, 
Arabia. Harvey was the son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hoppe, 
was married to Marvalyn Soles 
and had 2 sons, Jimmie and 
Kenneth. 




Cpl. Kenneth Charles 
Ehrler - Born March 4, 1917 
— Entered the service in April, 
1941 and was killed in action 
March 8, 1945. He was a son 
of the late Mr. and Mrs. Arch 
Ehrler. 



\ 



Pvt. Harold E. Young — 
Born April 2, 1924 - Entered 
the service March 6, 1943 at 
Camp Roberts, California and 
was killed in action on the 
Island of Luzon on April 16, 
1945. He was a son of the 
late Mr. and Mrs. Emil C. 
Young. 




BUCKHAWK VALLEY 

Elizabeth, Illinois 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

WOODEN EDUCATIONAL TOYS AND 

TEACHING AIDS 



FOR GOOD RESULTS USE 

MOORMANS 

Mintrates — Pre-Mixes — Minerals 
Parasite Control — Sanitation Products 

GORDON HATFIELD 

ELIZABETH, ILLINOIS 



LIVESTOCK DEALER 
Specialize in Feeder Pigs 

Lester "Barney" Meyerhofer 



Elizabeth, III. 



Phone: 858-3326 



ABBOTT'S RESTAURANT 

Jet. 20 & 84 - 2 Miles West 
of Elizabeth, Illinois 

Marie & Harry Abbott 



ALFRED J. ERTMER 



ELIZABETH, ILL. 
Gulf Oil Products 



FUEL OIL - GASOLINE - MOTOR OILS 
PHONES: 858-3329 or 858-3710 




'HAIR STYLES FOR YOUR LACE AGE 
AND SPACE AGE ACTIVITIES" 



K 



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O T T A G E 



WOODBINE, ILLINOIS 



MILLHOUSE BROS. & CO. 



Hardware — Housewares — Sporting Goods 



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FERTILIZER 
EQUIPMENT 
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AND 
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Galena, III. 



"EVERYTHING THE FARMER USES" 
Elizabeth, Illinois Phone: 858-3415 



ST. MARY'S CHURCH 

On June 1, 1853, Bishop Vandevelde acquired in and 
near Elizabeth a tract of 640 acres of land from Abram 
Reynolds and his wife. Apparently, as early as 1862 the 
pastor at New Dublin came to offer Mass on a weekday in 
private homes in and around Georgetown. Sometime 
around 1864 a log church was built on the south side of 
the town of Elizabeth on what is now Mrs. Edmund J. 
Coveny property at 209 S. Madison Street. 




It was Bishop Duggan, who on January 7, 1 860 acquired 
the present land, on which is situated St. Mary's Church and 
rectory, from John and Elizabeth Maguire. There must have 
been some thought to building on this site at that time; 
however, in 1866, since the log church had proved too 
small for the congregation a larger building, a brick one, 
was purchased from a Doctor Babbitt. This building was 
remodeled and called St. Mary's Church; the earlier church 
was called the church of Our Lady of Sorrows, which title 
appears in some of the Church records even until 1914. 
The land acquired from Abram Reynolds was sold August 
22, 1868. 

When Rev. Father George Ratz became pastor of St. 
John the Baptist Church, Savanna, in 1880, the care of the 
Elizabeth parish fell to him and his successors. On December 
19, 1880, the land for the Cemetery was acquired from 
Martin Wishon and his wife, Catherine. At this time 
Elizabeth was attended from Savanna every fourth Sunday. 

The following appears in an old record book; 

"Pursuant to call the members of St. Mary's Church met 
at their Church in Elizabeth, May 29, 1881 the following 
proceedings were taken: of which J. J. Coleman was in the 
Chair and J. J. Artman was secretary: On motion that we 
build a new church on or near the place of the old building. 
Carried. On motion Messrs. Andrew V^and, Francis Baum- 
gartner and J. J. Artman were elected to serve as building 
Committee." Later Francis McAneny and James Levens were 
added to the Committee. Subscriptions for the purpose of 
building a new church were then obtained. 

So in 1882 the frame church was completed on the 
property purchased in 1860 by Bishop Duggan on the 
northwest corner of the intersection of Catlin and Washing- 
ton Streets. 

Apparently collecting funds to build the school and 
convent started late in 1884. Work proceeded on it through- 
out 1885. It was built just to the north of the church on 



Catlin Street. It was run by the Sisters of St. Francis of 
Milwaukee. 

In August 1887, Rev. Joseph RuetershofT became the 
first resident pastor of St. Mary's, Elizabeth and with his 
arrival begins the history of St. Mary's as a parish in the 
full sense. Quickly enough Fr. RuetershofF set about build- 
ing the rectory, which is in use to this day. On July 8, 1889 
Father RuetershofF acquired three more lots from John and 
Elizabeth Maguire immediately to the north of Church 
property, between it and the cemetery. The parish school 
was closed at the end of the 1910-1 1 school year. 

Father John K. Nilles, who had been an assistant at 
St. Joseph's, Freeport for eight years, then came to Elizabeth 
on September 12, 1912. The parish meeting at which the 
decision to build a new church was held Sunday, February 
16, 1913. Subscriptions to the amount of $21,500.00 were 
quickly received. The cornerstone for the new and present 
church on the very site of the old frame one, was laid by 
Rt. Rev. Bishop Peter J. Muldoon on October 15, 1913 and 
on Thursday, May 14, 1914, Bishop Muldoon dedicated it. 
On that same day Bishop Muldoon confirmed a class of 
forty-eight persons, twenty-seven from Elizabeth and 
twenty-one from Hanover. The final cost of construction of 
the church came to $25,000.00. 

It was during The Rev. John L. Daleiden's stay in 
Elizabeth that what was St. Mary's School was torn down. 
Approximately 1930. 

The Rev. Robert Jackson, the present pastor, became 
pastor of St. Mary's, Elizabeth and St. John's, Hanover on 
the 4th of January, 1967. St. Mary's presently has about 
100 families, with around 400 total population. 

THE HISTORY OF FIRST METHODIST CHURCH 

In the fall of 1834 a circuit was organized, called the 
Buffalo Grove Circuit, with Elizabeth, an appointment. This 
circuit extended from Galena eastward to the Rock River, 
and southward to Rock Island. 

In the fall of the same year. Rev. L. A. Sugg, a young 
man of twenty-four years of age, was the preacher in 
charge. The first church building was a double log house 
with a ground floor, and was used for dwelling house, 
meeting house and school house. The benches were slabs 
turned flat side up with pins driven in them for legs. The 
desks were of slabs also, and were driven into the logs. 

On Sunday, October 5, 1834, a Sunday School was 
organized and the next day, Monday, a day school was 
begun with Mr. Shunk as the teacher. This old log building 
was on the hill. 




Rev. Sugg died the next spring and was the second 
person buried in the Elizabeth cemetery. After his death, 
Mr. Shunk, the school teacher conducted services, reading 
John Wesley's sermons, followed by prayer and testimony 
meetings. 



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Milling, Shelling 
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CRESLANES 




DINING ROOM & COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
GALENA, ILLINOIS 



777-1200 



Banquet or Party — Couple or Group 

You'll Enjoy the Atmosphere of Velvet 
Captain's Chairs — Beamed Walnut Decor 

"Served With Individual Loaves Of Bread" 
1 Mi. West on Rte. 20 — At Creslanes Bowl 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE FOLKS 

OF THE ELIZABETH COMMUNITY 

ON YOUR 100th BIRTHDAY 

"You Are Good Neighbors" 






i 




The First National Bank 
of Stockton 

THE BANK WITH THE DRIVE-UP WINDOW 
AND FREE PARKING LOT 

Stockton, III. Ph. 947-2050 



The second church was built in 1845, just bacl< of the 
present church building. It was 26' x 40' in size. This 
building was later moved away. 

The land on which the present church now stands was 
purchased on May 25, 1871 for $200. This church was 
40' X 60' in size. The basement part was finished the same 
year and was used during the winter. The upper part was 
completed the following year, and was dedicated in 
September, 1872. This is the part of the building which 
now houses the sanctuary. 

The Sunday School annex was built in 1922 and 1923. 
Later one of these rooms was made into a chapel, then 
changed to the pastor's study and office. 

A Hammond electric organ and chimes were installed 
and dedicated on July 27, 1947. 

The 120th anniversary of the church was celebrated in 
1954 with a banquet and program held in the church dining 
hall. An historical pageant was presented at the High 
School gymnasium. The celebration day service was held 
on Sunday, October 10, with the District Superintendent, 
Dr. Hughes B. Morris as speaker. 

In 1939 the three Methodist groups — The Methodist 
Episcopal Church, The Methodist Church South, and the 
Methodist Protestant Church united to form The Methodist 
Church. On April 28, 1968, the Evangelical United 
Brethren and the Methodist Church united to form the 
United Methodist Church. 

In 1964 the resident minister. Rev. Lyie Anderson and 
his wife, Mary, were commissioned as missionaries in a 
service at Embury Methodist Church in Freeport. After a 
year of study and training, the Andersons with their four 
children sailed to the Philippines where they are still 
located. 

The present minister. Rev. Raymond Rhoads, with his 
wife, Margret and son Alexander, has served the church 
the past four years. Church membership is 250. 

Ten teachers serve the Sunday School with classes from 
nursery school and kindergarten to the adult classes. 

Mrs. Orville Streicher is president of the Woman's 
Society of Christian Service, the organization formerly 
known as the Ladies Aid Society. Both the church and 
W.S.C.S. are active in missionary projects. 

ST. PAUL EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH 

The exact date of the beginning of St. Paul Evangelical 
Lutheran Church of Elizabeth is not in the church record. 
The congregation had its beginning during the summer of 
1 894 when the Reverend L. Dorn, pastor of St. Paul Lutheran 
Church in Rockford, began to hold services in Elizabeth. 
Ten months later under the direction of the Reverend Henry 
Dannenfeldt the congregation was organized. On August 
4, 1895, the Reverend F. A. Scharfenberg was installed as 
as the first pastor of the young congregation. 

At first the congregation did not have a church home of 
its own. Services were held in the Sunday school room of 
the local Methodist church. From there the members moved 
into a vacant building adjoining the Westphal store. Then 
a decision was made to build a church. On January 12, 
1896, the congregation moved into its own church. The 
white frame building on the corner of Ash and Catlin streets 
served as the congregation's home for 55 years. In 1936 
the congregation remodeled the interior of that building. 
The congregation built its first parsonage in 1919 at a cost 
of $4000.00. This home is now the home of the Thurman 
McCoys. 

The congregation is now located on the western edge 
of the village in the beautiful brick church and parsonage 
which they built and dedicated in 1951. 

The earliest records of the congregation are entered into 
the record book in German. These records date back to 
1895. Irma Augusta Studier was the first member baptized. 
The date of her baptism was August 11, 1895. The first 




wedding recorded is that of Carolina Schmith and Richard 
Backenkeller, dated November 14, 1895. The young 
congregation laid its first member to rest on December 29, 
1895, when they buried Johannes Rottmann. Four people 
were in the first confirmation class. Heinrich and Hedwig 
Sind, Ida Kuhse, and Johann Wiehler were confirmed on 
April 5, 1896. Of these four only Heinrich Sind was born 
in this country. 




The congregation has been served by ten pastors. 
Students and vacancy pastors served the congregation 
during those times when it was without a resident pastor. 
The present pastor, the Reverend Gilbert H. Pingel, was 
installed in December of 1965. 

In this centennial year the following members are 
serving on the Church Council: John Haas, Marvin Weisert, 
Theodore Krohmer, Rodger Selleck, Edward Klopf, Sr., 
Walter Ege, Wayne Schumacher, August Beyer, Richard 
Carroll, Lester Meyerhofer, Arnold Stuckwisch, Morris Krug, 
Edward Klopf, Jr., and Harold Muchow. 



THE SILVER SPUR TAP 

'A good place to meet your old friends 
and make new ones" 




BEER - WINE 
LIQUORS - PACKAGE GOODS 

Marvin & La Von Koester 
ELIZABETH, ILLINOIS 



GAS HEATS YOUR HOUSE, 

COOLS YOUR HOUSE, 

COOKS YOUR FOOD, 

DRIES YOUR CLOTHES, 

AND GIVES YOU HOT WATER, 

IT'S ABOUT THE BIGGEST BARGAIN 
IN A FAMILY'S HOME. 

A GAS EQUIPPED HOME MAKES SENSE! 



NORTHERN 
' ILLINOIS 

GAS 



RIFE & TIPPETT 
STANDARD STATION 




MEMBER 
F.D.I.C. 




Elizabeth, III. 



Ph. 858-3875 




AMERICAN OIL MOTOR CLUB MEMBER 

TIRES - BATTERIES - ACCESSORIES 

TOWING SERVICE 



HANOVER STATE BANK 



HANOVER, ILLINOIS 




M^J- 




Building Route 20 




Bruce Trost trying out The Brothers of the Brush portable jail 




Some of the band members are: Frank Wilcox, Lon Doan, Chas. Banwarth, Robt. Weir, Cletus Banwarth, Fred 
Hagie, Harry Fraser, Sherm Weir, Harry Weir, Fred Weir, Fred Monnier, Edmund Coveny, Frank Hagie, and 
Joe Fade 




William Perry, mail carrier, giving the mail to Rosie Haring 




McKillips' Ice Cutting Machine — 1912 




DITTMAR'S DRUG STORE 

The first pharmacy in Elizabeth was started by Dr. Hutton. Mr. Bernhard Dittmar worked in the drug store and later purchased 
I. He operated this store, where the Elizabeth Cleaner's is now situated, for 45 years until his death in 1935. 

It was purchased about 1937 by John Chiaverina who had been employed by AArs. Helen Cording, who took over the store foilow- 
ng her father's death. At this time its name was changed to Elizabeth Pharmacy. 





.^■-.jittaifewa^ 



The Bakery - 1909 



The Buggy Shop, located where the funeral home 




Elizabeth School 1904 





The burned ou» top of the Elizabeth School— 1913 



THE ELIZABETH FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The Elizabeth Fire Department was started by Harry 
McKillips during his term as village president in 1925 or 
1926. 

Eight firemen comprised the department. They were 
Ray Posey, chief; Omer Beck, Miles Kahl, J. C. Lee, Ray 
Hutchison, Frank Wand, Ralph Wand and Ansel Breed. 

The first equipment was a two-wheeled hose cart which 
was stored in the old pump house along the tracks by Stan's 
Food Store. 

A few years later they purchased an old truck and made 
a box on it to haul the hose. This was used until the 1937 
Chevrolet pumper was purchased. 

The department now has 35 members and nine pieces 
of equipment, plus an ambulance. 

During the past year local firemen answered 27 fire 
calls and 23 emergency calls. 

ELIZABETH FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT 

A fire at the present Wayne Krohmer farm with no fire 
fighting equipment available to fight a rural blaze, 
prompted investigation of the possibility of fire protection 
for the rural area. 

The matter was brought to the people of the area in 
1946 with polling places in Elizabeth, Weston and Wood- 
bine. The first board consisted of Edward Klopf Sr., presi- 
dent; John Krohmer, vice-president; and Howard Breed, 
secretary; Donald Eaton of Stockton was the attorney. 

The district purchased the fre-fighting equipment from 
the village for $2,000. This included a 1937 Chevrolet 
pumper, ladders, hose, etc. 

The district included all of Elizabeth and Woodbine 
townships and the northern two-thirds of Derinda town- 
ship. Today the district is almost half again as big due to 
annexations. It is approximately 26 miles across from north 
to south. The assessed valuation, which was $8,500,000 
at the time of formation has been as high as $14,000,000. 

At the time the district was formed the fire truck was 
housed next to the barn on Myrtle Street owned by Stanley 
Goldthorpe. It was later moved to what is now the village 
hall on Main Street until 1957 on completion of the new 
fire station on Madison Street. 

Trustees are appointed by the circuit judge for terms of 
three years each. Present board members are John Krohmer, 
president; Mario Specht, vice-president and Don Brudi, 
secretary. 



ELIZABETH FIRE PROTEGION 

DISTRia 




TRUSTEES 

DONALD BRUDI 

JOHN KROHMER 
MARLO SPECHT 

JAMES VINCENT - Attorney 

ELIZABETH, ILLINOIS 



ELIZABETH VOLUNTEER FIRE 
DEPARTMENT 



iT" 



/ 



'■ ■ ■ ■ 'i 




A QUALIFIED, DEDICATED DEPARTMENT 
"ALWAYS READY TO SERVE" 





^^^^■^ 






I '-il-si^ 





Pouring Sidewalks — John McKinzie in doorway, Henry Goldhorn, Chas. Allen with Wm. Allen 
in front, Jim Goard, John Steinberger, Leo Eade, Don Clegg and Will Fraser 




Ashmore Mine 



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^^hB^S 






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Main Street Elizabeth 



Henry Mest, Tom Bingham and Alphonso Allen were quarantined at the "Pest 
House" during the small-pox scare of 1904. Located in the old stone quarry on 
the hill. 




End of Spanish-American War. Stand erected on ground fo 
1887. (Stan's Supermarket is located there now.) 



■|y occupied by Elizabeth Hotel which was destroyed by fire 




Threshing 




lilding the railroad in 1887. Also showing the school house, which is now the Edmund Fischer residence. 




"The Baseball Te 



Back row: Frank Wilcox, James Shannon, Lloyd Engle, School Supt.; Sammy Raulins, Umpire; Ralph Wilcox 
2nd row: Elmer Westphal, Lee Axtell, Ray Logan, Louis Westphal, Raymond Fablinger 
Front: Charles Nash, Harlow Virtue and Frank Hagie 




Waiting for the governor to come to Elizabeth 



/ 




Elizabeth street scene 



FAITH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH 

Faith Ev. Lutheran Church was organized Oct. 3, 1965. 

The first board had Frank Lieb as chairman; Lawrence 
Mitchell, vice-chairman; Ralph Knauer, secretary; Arthur 
Schuiz, treasurer; Arthur Albrecht, Henry Albrecht and John 
Krohmer, elders; Gordon Hatfield, Wayne Trost and LaVerle 
Streicher financial secretaries. Sunday school superin- 
tendent is Glen Albrecht and Mrs. Wayne Trost is secretary. 
The Rev. F. E. Bartling is pastor. 

Mrs. Frank Lieb was first president of the Dorcas Circle 
with Mrs. George Morhardt, vice-president; Mrs. Arthur 
Schuiz, secretary; and Mrs. Lawrence Mitchell, treasurer. 

Mark Albrecht was first president of Faith Lutheran 
League with Kenneth Morhardt, vice-president; Jayne 
Krohmer, secretary; Dennis Albrecht, treasurer; and Rose 
Albrecht, recreation chairman. 

THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

"Lord, I will take possession of this country in Thy Name 
and will try to win it for Thee." This was the voice of a 
Missionary in the wilderness, and as far as we can learn 
the Rev. Aratus Kent, was the f rst messenger of God, sent 
to this vicinity by the Presbyterian church. In 1830 the 
American Home and Missionary Society had sent the Rev. 
Mr. Kent as its General Agent for the Northwest and it was 
he who conducted the first Presbyterian service in the 
vicinity of Elizabeth. This service was held in the home of 
a man named Ames at Rocky Point. This house stood about 
one hundred yards northeast of the present Georgetown 
bridge. After this first visit Presbyterian services were held 
at intervals in private homes by this man and by the Rev. 
Ozias Littlefield. 




By 1839 the village of Elizabeth was in existence, so 
shortly thereafter the few Presbyterian people who lived 
here felt the time had come to organize themselves into a 
church. The Rev. Mr. Littlefeld called a meeting and 
examined the credentials of four persons who presented 
letters of church membership, a fifth was accepted on 
profession of faith. Articles of faith and a covenant were 
drawn up and adopted. Francis Grahm was elected a ruling 
elder. It was christened "The First Presbyterian Church of 
Elizabeth", and on February 10, 1844 it began its existence. 

The first five members were; William P. Warwick, 
Francis Grahm, MrsT Harriet McDonald, Mrs. Elizabeth Lewis, 
and Alexander Mollison. The first person to be received 
into membership after its organization was John Rees, 
father of Sarah Rees, and Sarah Rees was the first child to 
be baptized. 

The first church services were held in a small wooden 
school house, which was situated not far from the present 
site. But a stone structure, standing in nearly the same 
place as the present church, was purchased and "fitted up" 
with doors and windows. On Christmas Day 1847 the last 
of the seats were put in so that services could be held. This 
served not only as a place of worship but, here too, the 
village school teacher taught the children their reading, 
writing and arithmetic. 

This stone church had a square tower but no steeple 
and no bell, however, Elizabeth also had a store and lime 
kiln, both operated by a Mr. Richard Brown who was 
interested in the Presbyterian meetings. Mrs. Brown, how- 
ever, disliked the hardships of pioneer living and so they 
sold their store and returned to New Jersey. Later Mr. 
Brown returned for a visit and learned that the church still 
had no bell and after he returned home he had a bell cast 
and sent it here as a gift to the church. When the bell arrived 
the clapper was missing, having become lost enroute. After 
some delay a local blacksmith agreed to make a clapper 
and the bell was hung in the tower. 

In 1875 the old stone building was torn down and the 
present building erected at a cost of $2549.45. The church 
was dedicated in July or August and later in the year an 
organ was purchased. The bell and clapper were transferred 
from the stone church to the steeple in the new church and 
have been calling people to worship ever since. 

At times the church was closed but the spirit of the First 
Presbyterian Church never died and it would revive and go 
on again. During its existence it has been served inter- 
mittently by students and ordained ministers. The present 
pastor is the Rev. Roane L. Deckert. 

In February 1944 the church looked back over a century 
of service to this community in its three day centennial 
observance. 

The early history of the church was written by the Rev. 
S. R. Meyer, and has been preserved and contains many 
interesting stories concerning the hardships, sacrifices and 
achievements of the church during its years of Christian 
service to the community. 



The settlers to whom the Reverends Kent and Littlefield 
came were miners, many of whom were wild and rough 
fellows yet like humanity the world over, they were men 
with hearts that could be touched with kindness and they 
were not unfriendly to religion. 




RAY'S TAP 

FISH - CHICKEN - SHRIMP 
Friday and Saturday 

Ray & Glenda Dampman 

1 1 1 E. Front St. Stockton, III. 


WALNUT 

WALNUT 

WALNUT 

SERVING JO DAVIESS CO. FOR 13 YEARS 

PRICE LOGGING CO. 

Elizabeth, Illinois 


RUTH'S BEAUTY SALON 

HAIR & WIG STYLING 
Phone: 858-2250 


Our Best Wishes to Elizabeth and all the fine 
people in this Historical event. 

ALBERT M. GREISON 

QUALITY FOOTWEAR 

SAVANNA, ILLINOIS 

Serving you for 40 Years 


COMPLIMENTS 

JO DAVIESS COUNTY 
ASCS OFFICE 


HOME OF FINEST QUALITY 
FURNITURE : CARPETS : DRAPERIES 

VANDERHEYDEN 
FURNITURE 

STOCKTON, ILLINOIS 
PHONE: 947-2560 


ROBERT'S REPAIR SHOP 

Elizabeth, III. Phone: 858-3491 

WROUGHT IRON RAILINGS - WELDING 

SICKLE SHARPENING & REPAIRING 


DON'S TAP 

Owner-Manager-DONALD CAMPBELL 

WHERE GOOD FRIENDS MEET 

BEER - WHISKEY - WINE 

DON & ELSIE 
Hanover, Illinois 



ELIZABETH CEMETERY 

Death of John Grey (also spelled Gray in subsequent 
reports) In August 1832 resulted in the need for a cemetery. 
Mr. Grey, who was in one of the block houses connected 
with a log tort erected by the early settlers for protection 
against the Indians was stricken with paralysis and died. 

Two pioneer citizens, Thaddeus N. Hitt and Samuel 
Hughlet, selected a suitable spot for his burial about a 
third of a mile northeast of Elizabeth on the river road. 
Whether these men intended this site to be the future burial 
ground for people of the neighborhood is not known. 

On June 28, 1835, the Rev. L. A. Sugg, 25, died and was 
buried near Mr. Grey. From then on burials became more 
frequent. 

While John Gray was the first to be buried in the 
cemetery in 1832, gravestones might indicate otherwise, 
showing that Amanda Winters, daughter of H. D. and 
Elizabeth Winters died Aug. 25, 1829. However, she was 
first buried in Georgetown and was moved to Elizabeth in 
1860. 



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Anna Marie Banwarth, born May 12, 1772 and died 
March 25, 1875 at the age of 102 years, 10 months and 18 
days is the oldest person buried in the cemetery. John 
McCoy Sr.'s birth extends farthest back in time. He was 
born Nov. 1, 1754 and died June 25, 1850 at the age of 
96 years, five months and 25 days. 

After some years the land in the vicinity of the 
cemetery, including the burial ground, came into the 
possession of Henry Green (prior to this it was government 
land.) However, he placed no restrictions on the land for 
burial purposes, except probably fixing its boundary lines, 
and it continued to be a free public burial ground up to the 
time of his death. He willed the land to the village for a 
public cemetery to be under the control of the corporation 
authorities. 

Prior to 1905 the cemetery had never been under 
control of any duly authorized management. This, coupled 
with the fact that the cemetery was nearly all occupied, 
necessitated some organizational body to take the situation 
in hand. 

A number of citizens with the purpose of better caring 
and enlarging the cemetery, filed a petition with the state 
for a charter. This was granted June 16, 1905 with the 
Elizabeth Cemetery Association given full power to act and 
do business under state laws as provided for cemetery 
associations. 

Charter members were J. C. McKenzie, Joseph Armi- 
tage, P. J. Mathiesen, J. H. Bateman, Thomas B. Bray, John 



Hagie, N. A. Gault, Frank Eraser, A. L. Cox, J. R. Logan, 
Fred Hagie, Bernard Dittmar, A. H. Weir, D. G. Smith, Fred 
Eraser, C. A. Walters, E. A. Laign, J. E. Clark, David Haig, 
W. L. McKenzie, W. J. Danial, S. H. Lane, J. P. Eraser, 
Charles Allen and E. W. Monnier. 

The village fathers realized the cemetery's interests 
could better be handled by the Elizabeth Cemetery Associa- 
tion than the village and at the meeting July 5, 1905, 
passed a resolution turning over control and management 
to the association. 

A combination board and wire fence was placed around 
the 1.74 acres at this time. 

The first addition was purchased from Charles Wilcox 
in 1916 and the second addition was bought from him in 
1939. The tool house was built in 1949. 

Nelson Hitt, who lived adjoining the cemetery, was the 
first caretaker beginning in 1905. Prior to that time every- 
one cared for their own plot. Mr. Hitt was the father of 
Riley Hitt and served until 1910. Riley Hitt succeeded his 
father until 1945 when he resigned. Asa Wilcox served in 
this capacity from 1945-1947 after which Rayman Stauss 
was caretaker until his death in 1966. Melvin Meyer is now 
employed in this capacity. 

Present officers of the association include Clarence 
Eastman, president; Harry Dawe, vice-president; Mrs. Albert 
McKillips, secretary-treasurer; William Fahrion, treasurer; 
and Maurice Read, Lester Meyerhofer, Mrs. L. O. Graves, 
Thurman McCoy and Burl Reed. 

Bernard Dittmar was secretary from 1905 until his death 
in 1933. Delia Laign then served until her death in 1938. 
Mrs. McKillips has been secretary since that time. 

MAUDE HAGIE — A Tribute and a Sampler 

Maude Hagie — Elizabeth's oldest active business woman! 

Maude Hagie — whose business has the longest con- 
tinuous existence in Elizabeth! 

Maude Hagie — treasure house of memories, and in- 
valuable source of information. 

Maude Hagie — grand and glorious lady. 




It is not easy to give the proper dimensions to this tribute, 
so great is our debt to Maude. 

Capsule history! The store on Main Street is operating 
at the very same location in which it was established by 
Grandfather Hagie in 1870! Thus, in only two years it can 
mark its own Centennial! When Grandfather passed on, the 
store was taken over by his sons and became known as 
Hagie Brothers. Maude started working there in 1918. She 
took over active management in 1927. 

In the nature of things, she has accumulated a vast 
store of historical material and information, as well as 
pleasant personal memories that cast much light on early 
days in Elizabeth. She has given graciously, selflessly, and 
unstintingly of her store of lore. As a source of authentic 
information, we found no single source to compare with 



Gray's Meat Market 

HOMER & FRANK 

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Maude. Our debt to her is great indeed. 

As a case in point consider: Many of the pictures you 
are enjoying in fhis book are here only because Maude 
generously made them available from her private collection. 
This is nothing new for Maude Hagie. For many years, 
students have almost automatically gone to her for help 
v\/ith history assignments. Maude always gave. 

We salute you, Maude Hagie I ! ! With gratitude and 
with affection. 

Share with us now just a few posies from Maude's 
bouquet of memories. She remembers: Walking with her 
mother to visit her grandparents, the James Batemans, 
living in what is now the George Hoppe residence, and her 
mother often expressing regret that so little remained of 
Apple River Fort. 

Her father recalling the Shaw Hotel fire (in 1887), and 
how he and his brother worked frantically with soaking 
mops damping down the walls of the frame building in 
which they had their store, so that they would not be 
ignited by sparks from the fire. 

Mr. Abe Cox, operator of an ice cream parlor next door 
(now Marie's Beauty Parlor), who made all of his own ice 
cream — by hand — in the basement. 

The bakery located at the present site of the Elizabeth 
Garage, where Elizabethans of the day would buy a single 
doughnut or cookie, eating it in a back room provided for 
the purpose. 

The lamplighter. This estimable gentleman was 
employed by the town. He made his daily rounds with a 
small ladder and a can of oil, pouring just enough oil in 
each lamp to give light for a certain length of time. After 
that? The streets were dark, of course. 

Dr. Philip Arnold, living in what is now the Howard 
Breed home. Surely, the doctor was a practical man, and 
a communications pioneer to boot. He kept a flock of 
homing pigeons in a loft at the rear. On farout country house 
calls, he would take a homing pigeon along. After minister- 
ing to the patient, and prior to his departure without the 
pigeon he would instruct that it be released after a certain 
interval, carrying a message advising as to progress of the 
illness, and whether another call seemed to be indicated. 
Saved a lot of miles that way! 

China Painting lessons from Cora Wishon Bodell, 
daughter of Martin Wishon, at that time the richest man in 
Elizabeth. 

For fifteen years, her father had a barbershop in the 
section of the store that is now operated by Maude and got 
1 5 cents for a haircut and 1 cents for a shave. 



this effervescent, talkative little man . . . 5'5" — 120 pounds 
(when soaking wet.) 

Practically a neighborhood boy, "Doc" was born on a 
farm between Savanna and Mount Carroll. As a child, he 
decided — precocious philosopher! — that life could be a 
bed of roses or a bed of thorns — whatever one made it. 
"Doc" opted for roses. He didn't start smoking (cornsilk) 
until the ripe old age of seven, and didn't progress to cigars 
until he was a tottering fifteen. 

"I was always a little fellow", he says, "just about 
jockey size, and I always loved horses so I naturally turned 
to jockeying." 

For fifteen years he traveled around country race tracks 
in Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin, and Minnesota, constantly 
increasing his knowledge of the care and training of 
animals. "Learning by doing." Friends — which "Doc" 
attracted as a magnet attracts metal filings— were impressed 
by the lad's growing skill. They urged him to study to be 
a veterinarian. 

So "Doc" hied himself off to Chicago to study. In 1913 
he officially became Doctor Lewis T. Oberheim. In the 
same year he started to practice in Elizabeth ... a location 
of which his male parent took a very dim view indeed. 

"I'll give you three weeks up there," his father said. 
This was assuredly a miscalculation on the part of Oberheim 
pere. But only by slightly over a half century. 

"Doc" has been here ever since that day in 1913, thirty 
of those years in the same location. Until very recently he 
still covered a lot of ground, personally handling the duties 
that are apt to take a veterinarian out at any hour in any 
kind of weather. 

Now he confines his work to vaccination of pigs. Since 
his second wife died in 1954 he has lived alone in an 
apartment above his office. He eats his meals out. "I'm 
a lousy cook", he explains with that big, big smile. 

His spirit and energy remain almost unbelievable to 
be housed in such a small frame. He still bubbles over with 
good cheer. His hobby — believe it or not ! ! — is dancing. 
Not too long ago, "Doc" was to be awarded a 50-year 
Certificate as an Illinois veterinarian. But he politely 
declined the invitation to attend. It was in Chicago on a 
Tuesday night . . . and that was the night for "Doc" to iron 
out a few kinks in his performance of the frug. 

He is proud of the fact that he didn't suffer a single 
injury during his riding career. He ascribes his long happy 
life in large part to his agility on horses, and also on the 
dance floor. 

Say what you will, "Doc" has lived to enjoy life. And 
he shows it. 




"DOC" 

Elsewhere in these pages 
we pay a well-deserved 
tribute to Elizabeth's oldest 
active business woman . . . 
Maude Hagie. 

We give you now her male 
counterpart — the irrepressible 
little man with the big cigar 
and big smile — 89 year young 
"Doc" Oberheim. 

Officially, and perhaps 
properly, this should be stated 
as Dr. Lewis T. Oberheim, but 
somehow stuffy dignity seems 
out of place when applied to 




this county for six years. 



HONORABLE J. C. McKENZIE 

John Charles McKenzie 
was born in Woodbine town- 
ship on February 18, 1860, 
son of Donald and Sarah 
McKenzie. 

His father was a pioneer 
settler of this county, coming 
here in the early forties. Ex- 
cept for a brief time in Cali- 
fornia, during the gold rush 
fever, he had always resided 
in Elizabeth and Woodbine 
township. 

John was reared on his 
father's farm and educated in 
local schools. He was a student 
at the Normal School of Val- 
pariso, Indiana, and was so 
scholastically inclined that he 
became a teacher, teaching in 



In 1887 he began the study of law and was also a 
senior member of the firm of Atchison and AAcKenzie, grain 
merchants and proprietors of a general flour and feed store 
in Elizabeth. 

He served as representative in Congress from the 13th 
district from 1911 to 1925 or a period of seven terms. On 
March 4, 1925, he was appointed by the President as chair- 
man of a commission to study the Muscle Shoals project. 

He was a member of the Masonic Lodge of Elizabeth, 
and of the Consistory in Freeport. He was a member of 
the Methodist Church and trustee of the Cemetery Associ- 
ation. He carried on his duties as an Elizabeth lawyer 
actively until shortly before his death and was a member of 
the Illinois Bar Association. 

He suffered a heart attack on Sept. 1, 1941 and passed 
away sixteen days later at the age of 81 years. Burial was 
in Elizabeth cemetery. 



On the following pages you will find a short history of 
a few of the doctors and other persons of interest who 
played an important role in the past of Elizabeth. We realize 
that there were many more people through the years that 
should be placed on these pages, but information about 
them is in most cases unavailable. Some of the doctors' 
names that we have happened upon during our research, 
but with very little information concerning them, although 
they served the Elizabeth area, are, doctors Beebe, 
Howarth, Little, Kittoe, Crummer, Caldwell, Lewis, Shank, 
Smith and Hagie. 



DR. ANTON NADIG 

Dr. Anton Nadig was born 
December 22, 1869 in Rush 
Township, the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Jacob Nadig. He finished 
his grade school work in Eliza- 
beth, attended high school in 
Dixon, Illinois; then went to 
Chicago and enrolled in a 
physician's and surgeon's 
college. He was graduated 
from here in 1902 having 
completely worked his way 
through medical school. He 
began his first practice in 
Nora, Illinois. 

Dr. Nadig's uncle. Dr. 
William Hutton, practicing in 
Elizabeth at the time, invited 
him to be associated with 
him, and he began practicing 

here in 1903. Dr Hutton died in less than a year's time, 

leaving the practice to Dr. Nadig. The rest of his life was 

devoted to the health and welfare of Elizabeth people and 

those in the rural area. 

He married Sarah Bartch of Stockton. They had one 

son, Clyde, now living in Des Moines, Iowa. 

Dr. Nadig and his nurse and housekeeper. Miss Laura 

Price, both lost their lives in a gas explosion and fire at the 

Nadig home about 10 o'clock the night of May 23, 1927. 

They were rushed to Freeport Methodist Hospital but both 

died early the next morning. 

Dr. Nadig, only 57 at the time of his death, had spent 

most of his life caring for Elizabeth people and was loved 

by everyone. 




DR. PHILLIP ARNOLD 

Dr. Phillip Arnold was 
born May 22, 1865, in Guil- 
ford Township, on the family 
farm. (Now the Meldon Grube 
farm.) Because of a childhood 
accident, one of his legs was 
amputated and it was after 
that, he decided to go to medi- 
cal school. 

He entered Tulane Medical 
School in New Orleans, Louis- 
iana, and in 1890, several 
years after he had started his 
practice, he went to Heidel- 
berg, Germany for one year 
to do post graduate work. 
He married Kate Eadie of Hanover and they built the 
brick house that is now the Howard Breed residence. This 
served as his office and home during the years that he 
practiced in Elizabeth. For a time he also served as County 
Coroner and was a member of the Knights of Pythias Lodge. 
Dr. Arnold received much notariety because of his use 
of homing pigeons to carry messages from his patients. 

Both Dr. Arnold, and his wife were in very poor health 
and around 1906 he discontinued his practice, and moved 
to Hanover. Dr. Arnold died in 1909 in Hanover. 




DR. ELVIN J. WILEY 

Dr. Elvin J. Wiley was 
born in 1900, the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. James Wiley of Han- 
over, and attended the Han- 
over schools. He later entered 
the school of medicine at 
Loyola University in Chicago. 

In 1923 he married Helen 
Peters of Hanover and they 
through the years became the 
parents of three children. 

Dr. Wiley interned at St. 
Bernard Hospital in Chicago 
and came to Elizabeth to start his practice on July 5, 1927. 
His first office was in his home, which was the Hutton 
Apartment over Mr. Dittmar's Drug Store. 

On September 5, 1928, he bought out Dr. Denny and 
took up his practice at the residence where his widow still 
resides. 

On November 9, 1936, Miss Mary Artman, who had 
graduated from St. Francis School of Nursing in Freeport, 
came to work for Dr. Wiley and remained as his office nurse 
until his death on November 20, 1957. 

Dr. Wiley was a member of the Presbyterian Church 
and of the Masonic Lodge, and served the community well 
for a period of over 30 years. 




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DR. COLEMAN BUFORD 

Dr. Coleman Buford was 
born in Lexington, Missouri in 
1872. He was married to Ada 
Abildgaard. They were the 
parents of eight children. 

Dr. Buford came to Eliza- 
beth during World War I. He 
acted as a consultant to Dr. 
Nadig and also performed 
minor surgery. 

In 1921 he built the home 
now owned by Mel Schulz. 
The family lived here in Eliza- 
beth during the summer months, living in Chicago the rest 
of the year. They lived here permanently from 1933 until 
the doctor's retirement in 1953, when he moved to Florida. 
Dr. Buford practiced until he was past eighty years of age. 
Dr. Buford was one of the founders of the College of 
Surgeons. He was also instrumental in getting the County 
Health Department started in Jo Daviess County. 



DR. WILLIAM HUTTON, JR. 

Dr. William Hutton, Jr. was 
born in France on May 27, 
1848, of Scottish parents. He 
graduated from the school of 
medicine in Ann Arbor, Michi- 
gan in 1874 and went directly 
to Highland, Wisconsin to start 
his practice. In 1876 he 
married Christin Monnier, who 
died shortly after. 

In 1877 Dr. Hutton came 
to Elizabeth to start his practice 
and in 1880 he bought the 
building and practice of a Dr. 
Caldwell. The building at that 
time being a frame structure, (where Elizabeth Cleaners is 
now located,) served as his first home and office. In the 
front of the building he put in a Drug Store, and hired 
Bernhard Dittmar to operate it for him, thus Bernhard 
learned the pharmacy trade. 

In 1882 he married Catherine Bauer and to them were 
born seven children. One son preceded him in death. In 
1884 he bought the old school house, (now the Edmund 
Fischer residence) and converted it into a suitable dwelling 
for his family. 

In 1886 he went to Rush Medical in Chicago to do post 
graduate work and in 1892 he went to Vienna for six 
months for more post graduate work. While in Vienna a 
Dr. Shank took over his practice. 

Early in 1903, Dr. Hutton invited his nephew. Dr. Anton 
Nadig to come to Elizabeth to practice with him, which he 
did. By this time Dr. Hutton had bought a house and moved 
his family from the old school house to the house now 
occupied by the Frank Leib family. During his years in 
Elizabeth, Dr. Hutton was responsible for the building of 
three of the brick structures on Main Street which are 
occupied by various stores today. 

He was very interested in land and cattle, so he bought 
a farm, (now occupied by the James Brown family.) On 
November 22, 1903, having just purchased two carloads 
of cattle, he decided to walk to the farm with his brother, 
Neal, to look them over. The cattle were on the other side 
of the river, so since the river was frozen over, they walked 





across, and consequently they both broke through the ice. 
Dr. Hutton's brother had on woolen gloves and was able 
to cling to the ice and rescue himself. The Doctor's body 
was recovered two hours later by a group of men from 
lown. 

So, after being in Elizabeth less than a year. Dr. Nadig 
was left to take over his uncle's entire practice. 



MRS. MABEL HOOD 

Mrs. Lyie E. (Mabel) Hood 
retired in 1948 after 37 years 
of teaching, 30 years of which 
were in the Elizabeth School 
System. At her death, April 1 1, 
1966, her family and friends 
established a memorial fund 
to be used in the development 
of the Elizabeth grade school 
library. Over 27 volumes have 
been received by the school 
from this memorial fund. 

Mrs. Hood taught in Eliza- 
beth from 1911 to 1914, In 1915-16 and again in 1921. 
In 1919 she married LyIe E. Hood and they were the parents 
of a twin son and daughter, Robert of Byron, and Dorothy 
of Freeport. 

In 1923 Mrs. Hood again returned to teaching in Eliza- 
beth, first on a part time basis and then full time. Mrs. 
Hood usually taught the upper grades and was principal 
of the grade school for several years. She was a stern but 
devoted and fair instructor, she enjoyed nature study and 
often went on hikes with her students. 

After leaving the local school system in 1948 she was 
a housemother at Illinois College, Jacksonville, for two 
years. After retiring from there in 1952 she lived with her 
daughter in Freeport. 



WOODBINE 

Formerly known as Jewell's Prairie, named after one 
of its first settlers, was located approximately one-quarter 
mile south of the present location. 

In 1835, a school-house was built and used for both 
school and church for a number of years. 

A blacksmith shop and store were established in 1867 
and a postoffice called "Woodbine." 

The first church was Methodist, built in 1868. Also a 
German Methodist Church, erected in 1871. These are 



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WILKENING SALES CO. 



LENA, ILLINOIS 



now gone. In 1914a Grace Evangelical Church was erected 
and still stands. It merged with the United Brethren Church 
and was known as Grace Evangelical United Brethren. Its 
doors were closed June 30, 1967. 

Several of the buildings on Jewell's Prairie were moved 
to the present Woodbine site when the railroad went thru 
around 1887. Some of which are still standing, including 
the first grocery store, which stands next to the former 
grocery store and Post-Office building owned by L. W. 
Ryder. 

Several businesses were in Woodbine thru the years, 
and of those, two filling stations and garage are all that is 
left. The grain elevator, that was built approximately 75 
years ago, now owned by Leon Arnold, burned to the 
ground March 13, 1968. Several small buildings were 
saved. 

The Creamery built around 1894 was closed in 1961, 
as well as the Woodbine School. 

The name "Woodbine" came from the excessive growth 
of the Woodbine vine, or bittersweet that grew over the 
site. 

RODDEN 

In the summer of 1886 the Chicago Great Western 
Railway was being built through the northwestern corner 
of Illinois. A huge hill was a problem and they had to 
tunnel through which tool< considerable time with hand 
labor. 

A telegraph station was built at each end of the tunnel 
for communicating with the workers. After the rails were 
laid, clay and mud would slide down on the tracks and 
hinder the cars from going through. 

After the railroad was completed a station and depot 
were built on land owned by John Rodden. Mr. Rodden 
gave this parcel of land to the railroad company. Stock- 
yards were built there, as well as a large frame granary 
which held surplus grain for shipping. 

One of the railroad officials from St. Paul named the 
station "Rodden" after Mr. Rodden since he had donated 
the land for these buildings. Mr. Rodden thought it a great 
advantage to have this station located here. 

A store and post office were built, also a blacksmith 
shop and creamery. Later when automobiles came the 
farmers took their cream to Elizabeth. 

Rock quarries were started and rock was shipped out 
by the carload. Cattle, hogs, and cord wood were shipped 
regularly. 

Now all that is left is the post office and store building 
and a few dwellings. 

WESTON 

In 1842 and 43 the lead mines west of Elizabeth gained 
considerable notoriety and a large number of miners came 
there. Much mineral was found, and in the early "forties" 
Weston was a thriving mining town of between one and 
two thousand population. 

Cabins were built in rapid succession and in 1844 
Green, Goldthorpe and Co. started a store and post office. 
In 1847 the village of Weston was laid out and platted. 
There were many pool halls and gambling shops and about 
14 saloons. There was a "Headquarters Tavern" which 
stood on the rocky bluff on the hill known now as Kaul's 
Hill. A basement pit still remains as proof of where it 
stood. 

The first smelting furnace was started in 1843 by 
Green, Tart, Hughlett and Estey. The molds were constructed 
in a V shape and filled with lead. When the lead came out 
of the furnace it was a V shaped block weighing approxi- 
mately 1 00 pounds. 

Later Mr. Henry Green had a smelting furnace between 
Elizabeth and Weston, and he owned most of the surround- 
ing land. He lived on his farm near Elizabeth and was a 
United States Senator. He is buried in the Weston cemetery. 



There was no resident minister but a Methodist minister 
came to the church there. At one time the church was 
where the cemetery is now, but later another church was 
erected beside the rock school which was always known 
as Weston school. This school burned but was replaced, 
and is now the residence of the James Kristin family. 

A Mr. A. B. Lewis started a school in the church 
building, and it continued there until the school house was 
built in 1862. 

The pockets of the earth were soon exhausted and the 
miners moved on to "greener fields." When news of the 
California gold rush came to Weston everyone packed up 
and left. The store was closed and by 1859 the post offce 
was discontinued. Today all that is left is the school and a 
few farm houses. 



MASSBACH 

Massbach formerly was called Myers when John 
Schubert came there from Massbach, Germany. In 1892 
Mr. Schubert petitioned Congress to establish a post office 
and it was granted. However, upon verification it was 
found there was already a Myers, Illinois so he again 
petitioned to change the name to Massbach. The name 
means "Mass", a number of people living together in one 
place; and "Bach" means brook. 

Mr. Schubert built the first house and operated the 
general store, blacksmith shop, and post office. Mail was 
brought in from Hanover by horseback (sort of pony 
express.) It is told one carrier hauled a five gallon jug of 
whiskey for a farmer. In 1896 Mr. Schubert sold his 
business to Rudolph Dittmar, and he became Postmaster. 
Dittmar went into the machinery business and Kasper Heid 
became his partner. Fred Teichler became the village 
smithy having worked as apprentice for Schubert. 

In 1900 Heid & Dittmar built a new store, and John 
Dittmar plied his trade as wagon maker and wood worker 
in a building north of the old store. Later this building 
became a feed mill. 

The Massbach Telephone Co. was organized in 1901, 
and 1903 a cheese factory was built. Later Mr. Dittmar 
sold his hardware and machinery business and built a 
garage and show room and went into the automobile 
business. The telephone and post offices were moved to 
this new building. 

In April 1925 Sophia Teichler had the honor of 
becoming Postmistress and served in that capacity until the 
office was closed in 1957. There was tne rural mail route 
and this was carried by James Maloy and later by Oscar 
Krug. 

In 1900 the St. John's Ev. Lutheran Church was built 
south of Massbach. This was struck by lightning and 
burned. It was then decided to build a new church and 
parsonage north of the village. This church was demolished 
by tornadic winds in 1922, but was rebuilt and dedicated 
the same year. 

An elementary school district was formed in 1921 by 
dividing two adjoining districts and a school house was 
built. 

Today Massbach, like so many tiny villages, is almost 
only a memory; the cheese factory is closed, the telephone 
company changed to the dial system and the garage re- 
moved to make room for a new road. Thus it is the old 
has to make room for the new. 

AVERY 

Avery was a stage coach stop on the farm which is 
now owned by Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Berlage. The large 
house could accommodate overnight travelers with food 
and lodging. There was also a post office. Where the 
Long Hollow school stands, now the home of Mrs. Henry 
Binns, there was also a very nice church building. 



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APEX 

Apex was a settlement consisting of several houses, a 
school and post office. It was located between Elizabeth 
and Hanover. The school still stands but has been con- 
verted into a residence. 



GEORGETOWN 

Georgetown was the beginning of Elizabeth. It was a 
mining town, and consisted of a group of crude cabins 
occupied by the miners. It had a small store and lime kiln 
both operated by a Mr. Richard Brown. Georgetown was 
divided into small lots and a large group of people owned 
the lots. In October 1896, Gilbert Hutchison bought one 
lot from Henry Green. This was the birthplace of Percy 
Hutchison, a former sheriff of Jo Daviess County. In 
January 1899 Julius Westphal bought some of the land. 



(^SK,/T^t^y.i.c^ ' /.^j.iZd-f;.z 



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It is important to say at the time that the miners 
abandoned Georgetown and moved to the present site of 
Elizabeth in order to send their products on the new railroad 
which had been built through Elizabeth. 

In 1901 Julius Westphal bought the entire acreage of 
the little village of Georgetown. There are visible signs of 
some of the various town wells and two of the original 
buildings still stand on the farm now owned by Vernon 
and Clara Westphal. 



DERINDA 

Derinda was named after a lady residing in the 
township at the time when it was organized. She was the 
housewife of a former early postmaster and justice of this 
township, David Barr. 

Robert Campbell made the first known land claim in 
Derinda in January 1836. Mr. Campbell had come to Jo 
Daviess County from Scotland via the unusual route of 
Hudson's Bay and the Red River of the North, by becoming 
an employee of the Hudson's Bay Company, an early large 
fur-trader at the Selkirk Settlement in Canada. At the same 
time, other westward-bound settlers had been attracted to 
this vicinity of rich fertile valleys and rolling prairie hills 
along the Big and Little Rush Creeks. In the spring of 
1836, William and Thomas Oliver entered claims on the 
western border of Derinda, where they built their cabins 
along with Samuel McGrath, who came with his family in 
October of the same year. 

Many of the very early German and Irish descent 
pioneers from the area rode horseback to Springfield to 
purchase their future land holdings from the federal 
government. They returned here to stake out their claims, 
using their own methods of measurement prescribed by 
certain rivers and creeks, marked rocks, and boundary trees 
as landmarks. 




The law of 1820 set 80 acres as the minimum amount 
of land that could be purchased from the national govern- 
ment for $1.25 an acre. Persons who lived on public lands 
for five years and made certain productive improvements, 
received the right to acquire the title to 160 acres through 
payment of a small fee due to the Homestead Act of 1862. 

A post office was established in a general merchandise 
store, called the "Derinda Center Store," and opened by 
Joseph Pettit in 1867. The store sold groceries, and other 
various commodities up through the ownership and death 
of Sydney Anderson, the area's local telephone company's 
repair and service man. Also a cheese factory and creamery 
was in operation in this small hamlet. The present town 
hall was built in 1902. 

School was first kept in Derinda by John McKinley in 
his own house. The first schoolfiouse was built in this 
farming community in 1839. School was taught in a school- 
house and townhall at Derinda Center about the year of 
1850. The Derinda Center School was the last rural country 
school to remain open until May 1962, when all its pupils 
were transferred to the Elizabeth Public Schools. 

The first known preaching in the community was by 
Samuel McGrath, at his own residence, where afterwards 
a young circuit rider held occasional meetings. The frst 
church building was one which the German Methodist 
members purchased at Galena in 1855, took apart and 
brought back to this community in wagons, erecting it 
again. 

The German Lutheran Church was organized here 
approximately the same time. In the year 1856, traveling 
preachers and mission-minded ministers from neighboring 
villages conducted the first services. These pastors were 
transported by ox cart and horseback for a number of years. 

The first church was built in 1872, near the site of the 
present church, which is now the cemetery. The present 
church was constructed and dedicated in 1925. 



--f^ 










i\9'& 








THREE ELIZABETHS 
Carol Eickman 

In 1832 the area around present- 
day Elizabeth, near the Elizabeth- 
Woodbine township line in Jo Daviess 
County, was sparsely populated. Few 
settlers had staked out claims. Those 
who came in 1825 and 1826 were 
interested only in the lead mining of 
the area. After a few years some 
pioneers began farming. 
Early in the Spring, while farmers, carrying whips in 
one hand and guns in the other, were starting to plant their 
crops, reports of Indian attacks in the Dixon area began to 
circulate. Thereupon, news was spread among the settlers 
of a meeting to be held at the Labaum and St. Vrain store 
under the leadership of Captain Clack Stone. The settlers 
concluded that the protection of a fort was needed and at 
once began to clear one hundred square feet south of the 
present Elizabeth cemetery. The square was enclosed by 
a stockade of rough posts about twelve feet high, driven 
close together. One corner was formed by a settler's log 
house, and a two-story blockhouse was constructed in the 
opposite corner. Its upper story protruded two feet over 
the lower corner as a protection against Indians who might 
try to set the building on fire. Also constructed were two 
cabins for living quarters. Benches were built along the 
walls of the fort for the defenders as they shot through the 
portholes. Supplies were brought from the farms, and when 
the fort was completed, about twenty-two men and twenty- 
three women and children occupied it. 

In mid-June, George Eames, who had fled to Galena 
when he heard the warning about the Indians, decided to 
return to Elizabeth with some Galena companions to inspect 
his crops and visit his friends. They spent a joyous evening 
in the fort and had no idea that Indians were lurking 
outside listening to them. They found evidence of Indians 
the next morning. Their horses were missing! Immediately 
a group of six volunteers set out to retrieve the stolen 
horses. They were traced to Kellogg's Grove, where Eames 
and two companions, Stephen Howard and Michael Lovell, 
were killed by the Indians. The remaining three men went 
back to the fort for reinforcements. They returned to the 
grove the following day and found that the Indians had 
left. At that time they buried the dead. 

On Sunday, June 24, volunteers William Kirkpatrick, 
George Harkleroad, Fred Dixon, and Edwin Welch set out 
for Dixon from Galena with official dispatches. After eating 
dinner at the Elizabeth fort the four proceeded through a 
narrow gap. Welch spurred his horse on ahead. He found 
Indians sooner than he expected, for over the hill a band 
was waiting. Welch killed one Indian and, being wounded, 
retreated behind the other riders to the fort. Dixon, fearing 
there were too many Indians took off for Galena. 

The settlers at Elizabeth had just set out to pick goose- 
berries, but they hurried back to the fort after the fleeing 
riders warned them. Before long the whoops and yells of 
the Indians were heard, and the attack began. Indians on 
foot and horseback descended upon the fort, some to 
within forty feet. Because the women and children helped 
to keep the guns loaded, the Indians were deceived as to 
the number of occupants within. 

Harkleroad carelessly exposed himself while firing, and 
the Indians spotted him. He was killed instantly by a shot 
in the neck. He was the only person to be fatally wounded 
in this battle. Mrs. Elizabeth Armstrong took up his gun 
intending to use it, but the men decided it would be better 
if she loaded the guns and let them do the firing. 

Black Hawk, for he was the leader of the attacking 
band, thought that reinforcements would be coming and 
retreated after a few hours, taking what provisions could be 
found in the settlers' homes. The Indians felt this was 



safer than burning the fort and attracting the attention of 
any troops which might be in the area. 

Since there were no further attacks by the Indians, the 
settlers returned to their homes in August, and the fort 
was not used again. Today there is no trace of any buildings 
or of a stockade where the fort once stood. Harkleroad 
was buried nearby, but no monument marks his grave, and 
it is believed that the Great Western Railroad passes over 
the spot. There is no Indian burial ground because the 
retreating Indians removed all their fallen braves so that 
no one would know how many were lost in battle. Many 
of the settlers who had helped build the fort and fought 
there are buried in what is the present-day Elizabeth 
cemetery. 

Elizabeth is a living tribute to three brave women who 
played important roles in the town's early history. Elizabeth 
Winters, wife of John Winters, was one of the first settlers, 
and the town of Elizabeth is located on what was the 
Winter's property. Most people feel that the town was 
named in her honor. However, some historians feel that 
two other Elizabeths, Mrs. Elizabeth Van Volkenburg, who 
supposedly sneaked from the fort during the battle to 
obtain more ammunition, and Mrs. Elizabeth Armstrong, 
who helped to load the empty guns during the attack, may 
have shared in this honor. 

Reprinted from ILLINOIS HISTORY magazine. October, 1966 
published by the Illinois State History Library, Springfield. Illinois. 
(From Henry R. Boss. Skeiclies of the History of Ogle County 
Illinois and the Early Settlement of the Northwest, pp. 40-41 
Cyrenus Cole, / Am a Man: The Indian Black Hawk, pp. 183-184 
Donald Jackson, ed.. Black Hawk: An Autobiography, pp. 129-30 
The Historv of Jo Daviess Coiintw Illinois (H. F. Kett & Co., pub.), 
pp. 228-9L 583-84: Apple River Fort sign, Elizabeth; Black Hawk 
War monument, Kellog's Grove, Kent; interview with Miss Maude 
Maggie, March, 1967.) 

THE LIFE OF "EBY'S" MILL 
Dennis L. Albrecht 

lA^ ^^!^HB '^ 1842 a saw mill was constructed 

'f^^^Z^Y about one mile west of Elizabeth, 

Illinois, on the Apple River. Two men, 

one by the name of Isaac Horr and the 

other by the name of Mr. Smith, had 

^^^ ^ ^^P ownership in this building. They eon- 
^^H f AHj tinued to run it until in 1848 when 
B^lfl^BJIB they accepted Henry Glessner as a 
third partner of the firm. After Mr. Glessner became a 
partner, the style of the firm became known as "H. Glessner 
& Co." Joseph Watson purchased Mr. Smith's interest in 
1852, and a few years later the mill was changed to a 
carding and at a later date to a yarn mill. 

In 1855 Mr. Glessner hired a man by the name of 
Charles Eby. Mr. Eby was born in Baden, Germany, on the 
Rhine in 1832, and a civil strife in his country caused him to 
flee from his land in 1850. 

He came to America with five dollars in his possession 
and had only twelve and a half cents on reaching 
Philadelphia. He earned the reputation of an expert work- 
man because he had been taught the dryer's trade in his 
home country. He received good wages, and in 1855 came 
to Jo Daviess County where he was accepted by Mr. 
Glessner. 

Mr. Glessner purchased Mr. Watson's interest in 1865, 
and two years later the interest of Mr. Horr — who had 
died, but whose ownership still remained for a little 
while — was sold to Mr. Eby and to a man by the name of 
Mr. Hefty. Eby & Hefty bought the interest of Mr. Glessner 
in 1 870 and changed the name of the firm to "Eby & Hefty." 
About 8,000 pounds of yarn were turned out annually 
although they worked only seven months of the year. Mr. 
Eby bought the entire mill in 1877 and changed the name 
to "Eby's Mill" of which name it is still known today, 
although there were a few owner's after him. 

In 1897 the machines were taken out of the mill, alter- 



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ations made , and the building was refitted from a yarn 
mill to a flouring mill. Men and sometimes women carried 
their wheat by horse and wagon to the mill to be ground 
into flour. The power was supplied by a dam which was 
one hundred and twenty feet long and stood five feet high. 
It was built of hewed logs, and lumber was placed in front 
of the logs which were facing the water. The water was 
forced through a flume which caused a spiral wheel that 
was thirty inches wide to spin and make the machines 
inside the mill turn. Cement was added to the dam in 1914 
so that it would be more secure. 

In the early 1920's Jake Hetzel operated the mill, and 
at a later date Howard Hartman purchased it from him. In 
1929, due to an inflammation of grain, the mill burned 
completely and a lot was lost. Mr. Hartman built a grist 
mill on the same location in 1930. It was made out of 
redwood and stood three stories high plus a basement. 
One year the water was so low that a Titan tractor was 
used to supply the power. 

Mr. Hartman moved away from the township of 
Elizabeth and Mr. William Plosch continued to run the mill 
for a number of years until a lack of business forced him to 
close down. Around 1946 the mill was torn down and the 
lumber was sold by Mr. Plosch. 



■^■^^^H WHAT BECAME OF WESTON 

^^^^^^^^H| It has been said that "the lead that 

j^^BR^y^^F^ won the Civil War came from Jo 

^ "^ "^^^W Daviess County." Located in the north- 

fm ^> ^t west corner of this county is the 

^|L ^^^ famous lead-mining town of Galena, 

>*^^ ^^^ famous not only for lead but also for 

' its military leaders, such as U. S. Grant. 

Around the mining town of Galena 

are smaller towns of various size which 

have sprung up quickly, grown to a thousand or more, and 

then dwindled in population until, sometimes, nothing 

remains to show that a large town once existed — that 

people lived, worked and died there. This is the story of 

one town — Weston; how and why it grew, its people, and 

why it disappeared almost completely. 

During the early 1800's, when lead-mining was a 
flourishing industry in this area, quite a few surface deposits 
were found in a vicinity south and east of Galena, near 
Apple River — an area now located about three miles west 
of the town of Elizabeth, Illinois. 

Naturally, where there is work and industry, there are 
people; and when lead was discovered, hundreds of people 
moved to this area to work the mines, and more people 
followed them to set up stores and shops. 



In 1846, the maximum lead-production of the Weston 
area was fifty million pounds. As a result of this, John C. 
Gardner platted the town of Weston in March, 1847. 
Almost overnight, it grew into a thriving town of over 
1,000 people, most of whom were Cornish miners. 

The main street of this town was called Lone Street and 
still exists as a graveled country road winding through the 
quiet countryside. The first smelting furnace was run by 
one of Weston's leading citizens, Henry Green, who was 
the owner of approximately 1,900 acres of excellent land. 
He had been in this area since 1842, and it was because of 
his concern for the preservation of many vital and important 
facts that accurate records were kept after his arrival. His 
furnace was located somewhere between Weston and 
Elizabeth and his house was about one and one-half miles 
from Weston proper. The wood for his two-story, sixteen 
room house came from Bellevue, Iowa, where the closest 
saw mill was located. The lumber was hauled during the 
winter on a sled pulled by horses approximately thirty 
miles — from Bellevue, across the frozen Mississippi, and 
to the present location. When it was finished, it was the 
finest home in this locality. 

Mr. Green also donated land for a school and a ceme- 
tery. This first school — located on a point of land formed 
by two gravel roads and quite near the cemetery — was 
partially burned and vandals destroyed what remained. A 
new Methodist church was built approximately one-quarter 
of a mile east of the original school and was used as a 
school, too. In 1923, the Methodists went to Elizabeth to 
church and the building was used as a school until it, too 
burned in 1933. The rock for this building was mined 
right in the vicinity. A second schoolhouse was built in the 
same location as the Methodist Church. This one, a frame 
building, still stands and has been converted into a home. 
The persistence of the miners to provide a schoolhouse for 
the benefit of their children showed they were aware of 
the advantages of an education. 

The cemetery, incorporating about an acre or two of 
ground, is still in use, although many of the old-fashioned 
headstones have toppled. There are people buried there, 
including Mr. Green, who have fought in the Blackhawk 
War, or some other war, and some who were born in 1776. 
The people buried in this cemetery would be able to tell of 
many unbelieveable things and could recreate many scenes 
of days of yore. 

Another large landowner, Mr. William Goldthorpe, 
managed the general store and the post office and was a 
School Director for many years. He was believed to possess 
13,085 acres of land, and was also a partner with Green 
in the smelting business. 

There was also a racetrack on the northwest outskirts 
of the town and was owned by Mr. Williams. A blacksmith 
shop was run, being indispensible to the livelihood and 
prosperity of the town as, obviously, were the saloons, 
seeing that there were quite a few in Weston — the exact 
number not known; some believe it to be around thirty! 

Even with all the people and the business in Weston, 
the town did not prosper. In a few years, the pockets of 
ore were exhausted and the miners moved on to greener 
pastures, although some stayed to farm the land and raise 
their families. All that is left now of the town of Weston 
is its main street, the cemetery, the school, and an old corn 
crib which was once owned by one of the miners — turned 
farmer. The many acres that were once owned, mined, or 
farmed by one man were fenced off in small sections and 
sold. However, evidence of float mining can be easily dis- 
covered. All that one must do is to take a walk across the 
countryside today. Consider yourself lucky if you don't 
fall into a mining pit or come suddenly upon a huge, grass- 
covered mound of dirt. 

From an inler\ie\v with Mr. and Mrs. Glen Gill, Elizabeth. 111. 



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SKENE MINE 
Thomas Young 

Charles Ashmore was born in 
England in 1829. His father Joseph 
Ashmore came to the United States in 
1831, and to Elizabeth in 1832. Then 
he bought two thousand acres of land 
southwest of Elizabeth. About 1899 
he discovered "LEAD" on Henry Ash- 
more's farm. The Skene Mine was the 
result of his findings. 
The mine was discovered by Charles, but on Henry's 
farm. The reason they found it was because they were 
straightening a creek and there it lay on top of the ground. 
The two men mined it by themselves when there wasn't 
too much farm work to do. Charles bought Henry's half 
of the mine and later leased the mine to George Skene, and 
this is how it was known as the SKENE MINE. George 
Skene was born in the vicinity of Derinda. He was formerly 
a bridge builder in this part of the county, (Elizabeth) before 
he operated the mine. 

The mine had three shafts, the deepest one was about 
120 feet deep. At the highest point of output there were 
about 100 men working there, and at one time they ran 
3 — 8-hour shifts. There were two huge boilers to produce 
steam so they could run their machines, operate the pumps, 
and so they could hwve electric lights in the mine, which 
in those days was a little rare. There was one fatal accident 
in which only one man was killed, and one other badly 
injured. It happened because they were blasting and they 
thought that everyone was out of the mine. 

As the mine progressed there was a road built from 
the mine to the railroad tracks which was about one mile 
away. There was a side track built on also, for the empty 
waiting railroad cars to carry the lead to Dubuque, Iowa. 

In 1905 the Skene Mine shut down, and hasn't been 
reopened or worked in since. The mine was abandoned 
because it was too expensive to keep pumping out the 
water, because the biggest amount of lead was under 
water. 

Today there is not much left of the Great Skene Mine. 
If anyone were to visit the site where the mine use to be, 
you would find very little —maybe some small pieces of 
lead and the old shafts which are falling in. All the tailings 
have been hauled away and used on the county roads. 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 
All Ashmore — rural citizen of Elizabeth. III.; Maude Hugie — 
citizen of Elizabeth. III.; sauvenir of Elizabeth and Hanover includ- 
ing Schapcville and Woodbine printed by Inter-state Press, pub. by 
R. Cutler, Cedar Rapids. Iowa 



THE WISHON MINE 

Small but profitable 

Arthur Krug 

The mine which was known as the 
Wishon Mine was located near the 
village of Elizabeth, Illinois. It wasn't 
a large mine but the ore run that it 
had was a very valuable one. Martin 
Wishon who was born in Cumberland 
County, Ky., came to Elizabeth and 
began farming, but after not making 
much on his farm he decided to open a mine which he 
thought might bring him a better income. He was very 
right for the mine was to be a rich lead ore run; then around 
the turn of the century the ore ran out so the mine was shut 
down. 

Then in 1903 the Wishon Mine was reopened by the 
Wishon Mining Company, who thought they could find a 
lower run of ore under the old one. The company took 
this chance because lead ore in the early 1900's was a big 




importance to the economy of Elizabeth and the surround- 
ing towns, and if a big enough run of ore could be found 
it could bring in a good amount of money for the company 
and Martin Wishon. But the company wasn't in the red 
too much for they had a starting capital of 100,000 dollars 
to begin operations in searching for the vein of ore. When 
the company found the run, it too, like the first run was 
a rich one, and it paid off very well to the workers and the 
workers' families. It also gave Martin Wishon a good sum 
of money to live on as long as the mine was in production. 

But then as it had before, the ore vein ran out and the 
mine was shut down. Today all that is left of the Wishon 
Mine is a hole in the ground, and if anyone went to look 
at it there wouldn't be much to see. 

If lead ore were as important today as it was sixty 
years ago there would be some mining company on the 
site of the old Wishon Mine looking for another run of lead 
ore, and if they dug deep enough they just might find 
what they are looking for. 

REFERENCES 

History of Jo Daviess County. Illinois, H.K.F.& Co. Publishers, 
Published in 1878; Souvenir of Hanover and Elizabeth, Author 
unknown; Omer Beck, person referred to about mine 



THE NINETY-SIXTH REGIMENT 
Marion Ertmer 

By the summer of 1862, a crisis 
was beginning to arise for the Union 
forces of the Civil War. Instead of 
overtaking the Confederation as had 
been planned, it was stronger than it 
had been expected, and was now re- 
sisting the Union forces successfully. 
With this situation now existing it 
became necessary for Lincoln to call 
for volunteers. By the close of August of 1862, over a 
half-million men were awaiting to serve their country. Of 
this half-million was the Ninety-Sixth Regiment Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry. 

The Ninety-Sixth Regiment was recruited largely of 
men from Jo Daviess County, but it also consisted of men 
from Lake County in the eastern part of Illinois. The two 
counties joined hands because of their former relationship 
as being in the same Congressional District. This friendly 
relationship led to be an important factor of the Regiment 
because with this they could make themselves much more 
eflRcient on the battlefield. 

On September 6, 1862, the six companies from Jo 
Daviess County united with the four Lake County Companies 
and were mustered into service at Rockford. The remaining 
month of September was spent arming and drilling the 
men for field action. For the next year the Regiment was 
engaged in small skirmishes, but it was not until September 
20, 1863, that they received their full baptism of blood. 
This was at the battle of Chickamauga, and the losses for 
the Ninety-Sixth in killed, wounded, and missing amounted 
to two hundred-twenty, over half of the men engaged. 
Also two companies were captured which amounted to 
thirty-six men taken prisoner. The Ninety-Sixth suffered 
the heaviest casualties of any regiment in the Reserve 
Corps. 

After the battle of Chickamauga, there came a period 
of hard times for the Regiment. They were skirmishing 
daily in bad weather, with improper clothing, and worst 
of all, they had little or no rations. On some days the only 
rations that were issued were one ear of corn per man! 
But by the end of October, the Regiment was transferred 
to Georgia, and were now getting the proper rations once 
again. 




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Victor Ricke, East Dubuque, Director 
Roy S. Virtue, Hanover, Director 
Everett R. Read, Elizabeth, Director 
Ward Dangel, Savanna, Director 
Gus Haas, Elizabeth, Director 
Charles C. Youtzy, Elizabeth, Manager 



For the next year and one-half the Regiment was en- 
gaging in numerous skirmishes, and in some the casualties 
were quite severe. This period of time led to the end 
of their services. It was now June 30, 1865, and at this 
time the Regiment was stationed at Camp Douglas, Illinois, 
where the men received their pay and mustered out of 
the United States' service. 

The total number of casualties of the Ninety-Sixth 
Regiment rank in the upper portion of the list of other 
regiments. Of the seven hundred sixty-eight men who 
mustered into the regiment, over one-third of them did 
not live to see their accomplishment of reuniting the nation. 
In making these sufferings and sacrifices for three long 
years, the Regiment must have had a great devotion to 
their country. 

And so it was that on that June 30, 1865, the Ninety- 
Sixth Regiment Illinois Infantry Volunteers had passed into 
history. These were the men who had gone to the front 
to help their brothers who had previously gone to battle, 
and these were the men who tried and succeeded in turn- 
ing back the treason and rebellion that was threatening 
to engulf their homes. 

SOURCES 
llliiKiis in the War for the Union. H. W. Rokker. pp. 533-538; 
Historx of the Mneix-Sixth Regiment. Charles A. Partridge, pp. 27- 
30, 161-221. 249-261, *586-623; The Patriotism of Illinois, T. M. 
Eddy, used information throughout the book; History of Jo Daviess 
County. J. F. Kett & Co., pp. 401-407; Illinois Military Units in the 
Civil War. Helene H. Levene, page 31. 



.J^^lr * 



STONE SCHOOL IN LONG HOLLOW 
Lissa Lunning 

,^ i^ Tucked neatly in the hills of Jo 

J^s. 'W Daviess County, Illinois, lies the town 

■^ jB of Elizabeth; three miles west is Long 

^>(- rr iSF Hollow, a curling finger of valley that 

-<., reaches into the rising terrain. As the 

eye traces the length of Long Hollow 

on a local map, it notices familiar 

names of present-day farmers and rural 

residents. Before the eye has finished 

its sweep across the map it has also noted the Long Hollow 

School, a piece of local history that merits more than the 

occasional glance of an eye. 

The population of Long Hollow grew with pioneer ex- 
pansion westward. In 1858 it became apparent to the 
residents of Long Hollow that a school was needed in their 
community. On April 9, 1858, the final papers were signed 
closing a transaction between Nathaniel and Elizabeth 
Morris and the school trustees of Jo Daviess County. The 
transaction concerned the sale of a one-half acre of land 
at seventeen dollars for the construction of the Long Hollow 
School. A local resident and stonemason, Obediah Breed, 
was retained to erect the stone schoolhouse for sixty dollars. 
Breed, a descendent of the Massachusetts Breeds upon 
whose property the bloody battle of Bunker Hill was fought 
in the Revolutionary War, came to Jo Daviess County in 
1835. He started in New York state and traveled across 
Canada and around Lake Michigan until he finally reached 
the Rock River at the present site of Rockford. There he 
sold his team and continued toward Jo Daviess County on 
foot. 

Breed quarried the limestone for the schoolhouse about 
two miles north of the construction site. He used the "plug 
and feather" method of quarrying the rock — a method 
whereby a series of holes was drilled in the rock at certain 
intervals and explosives were poured into them; when the 
explosives were ignited, the limestone cracked along lines 
that passed through the drilled holes. Thus the stone broke 
into uniform pieces which were then hand hewn to the 
desired size. The finished stones were loaded on a "stone- 



boat" (a flat platform on runners that was drawn by oxen) 
and dragged to the construction site. Once there the stones 
were skillfully fitted into place. The little schoolhouse was 
ready for use in 1860. After the stone masonry on the 
schoolhouse was completed, Breed was sent by the govern- 
ment to begin stone work on a fort in St. Louis, an assign- 
ment that also attests to the man's skill. 

The yellow stone schoolhouse is rectangular, except for 
a small woodshed that projects from one side. The sturdy 
building has walls that are two feet thick, and it measures 
twenty feet by forty feet. The one room was furnished with 
blackboards on two walls and seats bolted to the floor. 
These, however, were later exchanged for more modern 
furniture. Windows on the south and west walls served 
as the main source of light, and one small door was the 
only entrance. 

The new schoolhouse accommodated grades one 
through eight, with sometimes only one pupil in a grade. 
When this happened, the child was usually put in the next 
higher or lower grade, depending on his or her ability. 

Teachers employed at the school usually boarded with 
nearby families, because the distance to the nearest town 
was too great for easy commuting, especially when the 
weather was bad. 

The conveniences enjoyed by students and teachers at 
Long Hollow increased through the years. The school was 
heated at first by a wood-burning stove, then a coal circu- 
lating heater, and finally an oil furnace. 

Electricity did not reach the little school until quite 
recently, so kerosene lamps in wall brackets furnished light 
on dark days. When school functions took place at night 
and still more light was needed, residents brought their 
own gasoline lanterns. The school was lucky enough to 
acquire a player piano for singalongs, but when electricity 
came to Long Hollow the piano was ably assisted by a 
record player. Before plumbing was installed, a washstand 
and dipper were used by the children when they cleaned 
up for lunch. 

The students of the Long Hollow School at first walked 
or rode to school in buggies or on horses. Later they 
enjoyed bicycles and rides in trucks and cars, but not until 
1952 did buses serve the school. 

As the school seasoned with age, it became the hub of 
community life. In the 1930's and 1940's socials were held 
on Halloween. At such affairs children would have small 
parts to perform, and a money-making project of some 
kind would be in progress to provide funds for much 
needed books and other school equipment. A community 
club was organized by area residents so that families could 
enjoy square dances, talent shows, and other recreational 
activities. 

When Elizabeth School District #208 acquired Long 
Hollow School, the school received the benefits of buses 
and other more modern conveniences enjoyed by larger 
schools. In 1957, however, the Elizabeth School District 
decided to abandon the one-room country school and 
transfer its pupils to the school in Elizabeth. The old build- 
ing is now a private residence. 

Some Long Hollow School students have become leaders 
of the community and are a particular credit to their school. 
Time has weathered the rock, and winds that whistle 
through the hills have left their marks on the roof, but time 
and winds have not by any means defaced the service that 
this one-room schoolhouse has given to the community. 



Reprinted from ILLINOIS HISTORY magazine. October, 1967 
pubhshed bv the Illinois State History Library, Springfield. Illinois, 

{¥\om' Historv of Jo Daviess County. Illinois. 187S. pp. 745. 
752; 1858 Bill of Sale. Jo Daviess County Courthouse, Galena: 
interviews with Howard Taft, Jo Daviess County Superintendent of 
Schools, Howard Breed, descendant of Obediah Breed. Mrs. William 
Eustice, and Mrs Cnc."- »■- 



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THE HISTORY OF A 

SMALL TOWN'S SCHOOL 

Tom Virtue 

Of all the memories treasured by 

the people of a small community, the 

country schoolhouse probably tops the 

list. The people remember the build- 

-| ^^^_ ing in which they received their edu- 

^If ^^^^k cation as compared to the modern 
^" ^^^^B school buildings, and in their minds 
the old country schoolhouse undoubtedly reigns as the all- 
round superior. 

The people at Woodbine, Illinois, have had such 
thoughts of their old schoolhouse, whether it was the first, 
second, or last of the three buildings used in that small 
town. Education began in Woodbine (then Jewell's Prairie) 
only three years after the Black Hawk War when Rev. 
Shunk erected a building which served as both school and 
church. For nine years the children of the area attended 
classes under Rev. Shunk, then in 1844 A. B. White and 
Solomon Shore built another building which also served as 
the school and church until 1868 when the Methodist 
Church was built. 

This second building saw many students during the next 
few years; in fact, in 1903 the district found it necessary to 
build another building due to lack of space. The new 
building was considered a great achievement, but once 
again in 1916 the community was asked for support. The 
contract for an Addition to the thirteen-year-old building 
was awarded to Jacob Bertsh, the lowest bidder at $1060. 

The next few years' history of this community's school 
do not reveal anything spectacular to the casual observer. 
However, if you speak to a few citizens of that small town 
you realize that like any other schools there were days 
which stand out in the minds of those involved. There were 
community meetings, public spell-downs, and picnics; and 
of course there were also the day-to-day classes which had 
their bright spots. 

Ironically the next large historical event for this school 
was its closing. All country school buildings were doomed 
to this fate, but the Woodbine school was one of the very 
last to close its doors. In fact, only five short years ago the 
students at Woodbine were attending the last few weeks 
of school ever held in that community. 

The disposing of this building by the Stockton School 
District was typical of many country school buildings, but 
the history of this schoolhouse was not over. On October 
13, 1962, the building was sold to Carl Brudi, a local 
farmer. Instead of using it as an extra barn as is the fate 
of many such buildings, this building was remodeled for 
human occupation. 

In January of 1965, Mr. Brudi's oldest son moved into 
this temporary home. He stayed for almost six months, 
but then again the building was left vacant. Not until 
November of 1966 were the doors opened again, this time 
to a new church formed by a group of local people. 

The future of this building is uncertain. It could be the 
home of a prosperous church, or it could be just another 
vacant school building waiting for some unknown means 
of destruction. Whatever the future may hold, this and the 
previous two buildings of the Woodbine School District 
have served the community well, and they are well 
remembered by the community. 




A HISTORY OF SLAVERY 
Susan Lunning 

At the time in 1818 when the 
territory of Illinois became a state in 
the Union it was under the jurisdiction 
of the Ordinance of 1787. This group 
of laws set down the rules for the 
government of the Northwest Terri- 
tory. Contained in these laws was a 
provision maintaining that there should 
not be slavery or involuntary servitude 
in any part of the Northwest Territory. However, in Illinois 
the great expanses of level farm land and the lead ore 
deposits proved to be good excuses to bring slaves from, 
the South. Illinois evaded the law in the Ordinance of 1787 
by passing several statutes which made the holding of 
"servants" lawful. These statutes came to be known as the 
Black Laws of Illinois. 

The chief attraction for slave labor in Jo Daviess County 
was lead mining. It was known that there were slaves 
working in the lead mines from 1 820 to 1 841 . At one time 
during this twenty years the number of slaves in the Galena 
area was estimated to be one hundred to one hundred fifty. 
Several slaves also were sold in Galena for domestic 
use. On March 14, 1830, there is a record of a sale of a 
Negro girl. She was five years old, and was purchased for 
the price of $75.00. One of the stipulations of her purchase, 
however, stated that she be set free upon reaching the age 
of 18 years. Another girl and her son were sold on May 30, 
1830, to receive their freedom at the ages of 28 and 21 
respectively. So in a sense the Jo Daviess County slavery 
was "indentured servitude." The slaves were compelled to 
work, with room and board, for a given amount of time, 
then set free. One sale was quite different from these 
others. This was the sale of a Negro woman as a part of 
a lot. Contained in this lot were horses, oxen, a herd of 
cattle and a wagon, as if the woman wasn't a human being 
at all. 

In Illinois the slaves were treated in much the same 
way that they were in the South — as lowly laborers. These 
feelings were so deeply rooted that when a white woman 
tried to teach some of the Negro children in school she 
immediately became the center of malicious gossip" and 
abuse. Even after slavery was abolished in the state the 
Negro children could not attend public schools or associate 
with white children. 

After the Civil War, however, anti-slavery became one 
of the chief sentiments of the Northern Illinois people. 
Colored children were soon admitted to public schools and 
with the passage of a law in 1874, Negro children attended 
free schools without molestation. The "colored line" which 
had been drawn between black and white children for so 
long was erased forever. 

It seems quite hard to believe that Illinois, a Union 
state in the Civil War, and a staunch anti-slavery state after- 
wards, once itself, had had slavery. Even more difficult to 
grasp is the idea that there were slaves toiling in the same 
fields we till today, and working in mines, long closed, but 
close by those which are active today. The thought of 
slaves and slavery brings to mind the South and wicked 
masters and huge plantations, not great grandfathers and 
our own backyards. 

Galena Guide Compiled and written by Federal Writers" 
Project (Illinois) Workers Progress Administration 1937 American 
Guide Series; The Historx of Jo Daviess Countv, Illinois, H. F. 
Kelt & Co., Times Bldg., Chicago. 111.; The Hislory of Negro 
Serviiiide in Illinois and of the Slavery in Thai Slale. Dwiaht Harris, 
PhD.. A. C. McClurg & Co.. Chic;igo." 111.; Bill of Sale from May 20, 
1830; Bill of Sale from March 17. 1S30; Jo Daviess County Record 
Book, Vol. A, Jo Daviess County Court House. Galena. 111., p. 108. 



IN MEMORY OF 

ELIZABETH VON VOLKENBURG 



TOM LA LONDE 

REAL ESTATE 

GALENA 



777-1775 777.U7(> 





ELIZABETH CENTENNIAL 





FIVESCORE AND SOME YEARS AGO OUR PIONEERS FOUNDED HERE IN 
THIS AREA A NEW COMMUNITY, CONCEIVED IN LIBERTY, AND DEDI- 
CATED TO THE PROPOSITION THAT ALL MEN ARE CREATED EQUAL. NOW 
WE ARE ENGAGED IN A GREAT CENTENNIAL, ANTICIPATING WHETHER 
OUR COMMUNITY, OR ANY COMMUNITY SO CONCEIVED AND SO 
DEDICATED CAN LONG ENDURE. 

WE ARE NOW MET ON A GREAT THRESHOLD OF OUR CENTENNIAL. 
WE HAVE COME TO DEDICATE A YEAR OF THAT PERIOD AS A FINAL 
TRIBUTE FOR THOSE WHO HERE SPENT THEIR LIVES THAT THAT COMMUNITY 
MIGHT LIVE. IT IS ALTOGETHER FITTING AND PROPER THAT WE SHOULD 
DO THIS. BUT IN A LARGER SENSE WE CANNOT DEDICATE, WE CANNOT 
CONSECRATE, WE CANNOT HALLOW THIS GROUND. THE BRAVE 
"ELIZABETHANS", LIVING AND DEAD, WHO STRUGGLED HERE, HAVE 
CONSECRATED IT FAR ABOVE OUR POOR POWER TO ADD OR DETRACT. 
THE WORLD WILL LITTLE NOTE, NOR LONG REMEMBER, WHAT WE SAY 
HERE, BUT IT CAN NEVER FORGET WHAT THEY DID HERE. IT IS FOR US, 
THE LIVING, RATHER TO BE DEDICATED HERE TO THE UNFINISHED WORK 
WHICH THEY WHO TOILED HERE HAVE THUS FAR SO NOBLr ADVANCED. 
IT IS RATHER FOR US TO BE HERE DEDICATED TO THE GREAT TASK RE- 
MAINING BEFORE US - THAT FROM THESE HONORED FOREFATHERS WE 
TAKE INCREASED DEVOTION TO THAT CAUSE FOR WHICH THEY GAVE 
THE LAST FULL MEASURE OF DEVOTION - THAT WE HERE HIGHLY 
RESOLVE THAT THESE EARLY PIOUS SETTLERS SHALL NOT HAVE DIED IN 
VAIN - THAT OUR OWN ELIZABETH COMMUNITY UNDER GOD, SHALL 
HAVE A NEW BIRTH OF LIFE - AND THAT GOWRNMENT OF THE PEOPLE, 
BY THE PEOPLE, FOR THE PEOPLE, SHALL NOT PERISH FROM THE EARTH. 



Paraphrased from President Abraham Lincoln's 
Historic Gettysburg Address— November 19, 1863 




Contributed by Mr. and Mrs. LeRoy J. Groezinger and Son, John Leslie 



Leroy's Tavern 



BEER - WINES 
AND LIQUOR 

SANDWICHES - SOUPS 
AND PIZZA 




IRENE & LEROY BECKER 



7{/c'U Xccfr 1f<M *}k 7^ ^e^ 0^ SfoinitA 



BEST WISHES 




TERRAPIN TWIRLERS SQUARE DANCE CLUB 



NEWS HEADLINES TAKEN FROM THE FILES 
OF THE ELIZABETH WEEKLY NEWS 
1913 

Feb. 1 — Elizabeth to have new moving picture shov^ of her 
own. Ed Burns installed machine in the Armitage 
Building. The building will be fitted with opera seats 
and every modern convenience. 

1915 

May 19 — Grant Highway to go through Elizabeth! 
Estimated cost for 190 miles is $3,160,000. 

June 16 — Elizabeth to have new Up-to-Date Picture Show. 
Said to be one of the best in Northern Illinois. Ed 
Burns — Owner — Star Theater. 

Aug. 4 — Much Property Changing Hands in Elizabeth. All 
real estate is advancing in price from $500 to $1,000. 
Prediction of boom is seen. Much of this is caused by 
the Grant Highway coming this way and the start of 
electric lights. 

I. E. Shaw purchased the Tom White bidg., which joins 
the State Bank, and in which Bray and Goldsworthy 
have had their Confectionary Store. O. M. Bishop 
purchased a part of the Bray property in which Bonjour 
and Wand ha^e their Plumbing Works, and Bray and 
Goldsworthy purchased the other part in which the 
Harness Shop is, and also Will Unger's Barber Shop. 

Nov. 24 — Electric Lights Soon! 

Dec. 29 - To Have Lights by First of Year! 

Dec. 5 — First piece of Concrete on Grant Highway Open 
for Travel. 

1916 

Jan. 7 — Lights Finally Turned On! 

Students of Sadie Hagie to Present Piano Recital 

February 24, 1916 — Those participating were: 

Irma Atchison, Bessie Powers, Howard Bohnhoff, Anna 
Wand, Florence Schreck, Florence Williams, Louise 
Fahrion, Mona Winters and Virginia Farrell. Also EfRe 
Stadel, Anna Becker, Alma Artman, Sadie Bohnhoff, 
Florence Becker, Alma Groezinger, Mrs. Joe Virtue, 
Mabel Armitage and Miss Mabel Pollock. 
Vocal Quartette — Mrs. McKenzie, Mrs. Pearce, Mr. 
McKillips and Dr. Hagie. 

Mar. 29 — Over 600 people attended Grand Opening of the 
new Elizabeth Garage. 

July 5 — Seven train loads of troops pass through city last 
week for Mexico. 

July 19 — W. W. Eastman of Hanover purchases undertaking 
business from Jos. Armitage Sr. 

Aug. 30 — Rev. Edward Merkle, pastor of Luthern Church, 
left for Waterbury, Conn, for his new charge. Rev. 
Meyer of Coal City, III. will take his place. 
At the Home Bakery - Bread 6c, Buns 12c, Pies 12c, 
C. L. Duell, Prop. 

Sept. 13 — Standard Oil to complete oil station this week 

Oct. 4 — H. D. Robinson sells barbershop to John Thomas. 
Lee Mitchell to assist Mr. Thomas. 

Nov. 22 — New lunch room and soft drink parlor to open 
soon in Westphal bIdg. To be run by Henry Rowley. 

Dec. 6 — Bishop's Big Opening. Huge crowd at opening of 
Bishop's New Opera House last Thursday. 

Dec. 13 - Mill Changes Hands - Eby & Winter sell Grist 
Mill to Jacob Hetzel of Sheron, Pa. 

Dec. 27 — W. C. Ivey to move his cigar factory in room 
next to State Bank (Maker of Highway Special Cigars.) 

1917 

April 25 — Seven young men from Elizabeth left last even- 
ing to enlist in the Army. 

May 9 — School boys leave their studies to help farmers 
with the crops. A. L. Cox retiring from his Confectionary 
Store, sold out to Tom White. 

May 23 — Clarence Holcomb, first Elizabeth boy to die at 
the front while fighting in France. 



June 6 — Elizabeth to have oiled streets in the near future 

in place of the old muddy ones. 

Red Cross Organized in Elizabeth. 
July 4 — N. A. Gault will build large show room opposite 

the depot. The old Odd Fellows bIdg. will be torn down 

to make room for the new structure. The Odd Fellows 

are making arrangements to move into the Menzemer 

bIdg. 
July 18 — Cletus Banwarth writes essay on America's Birds 

and wins first prize of $3. The prize was offered by 

"The Woman's Magazine" published by the New Idea 

Co. of New York. 
Aug. 1 — E. J. Burns to open up a large and up-to-date 

Sorghum Mill this coming season. The mill is situated 

opposite the Public School bldg. and will be ready for 

operation in Sept. 
Aug. 22 — Bethel School was Dedicated Saturday Evening. 
Dec. 5 — No more new cases of Small Pox reported in 

Elizabeth. School will start again next week and public 

meetings as well. 

J. F. Read has sold his 20 acre farm, on the edge of 

town, to Charles Siemen of Woodbine, for $600 per 

acre. Mr. Read sold his large farm to Burl Reed. 
1918 

Jan, 9 - Private Wm. Toms Dies at Fort Sill, Okla. 
June 26 — The Farm Labor Problem — All able bodied men 

are required to register next Tues. for farm labor. 

Registration to take place at the Post Office. 
Sept. 18 — Dr. F. E. Hagie to enter Surgery Dept. of Army. 
Oct. 2 — Word received that Wm. Reusch had died in France. 
Oct. 9 — School closed due to epidemic of Spanish Influenza. 

City quarantined for five weeks. 
Nov. 4 — J. P. Eraser & Co. make announcement that they 

will dispose of business holdings at this place. 
1920 
July 20 — Pythian Sister Lodge Organized. Elizabeth 

Farmers form Farmers Electric Organization with He'nry 

Droegmiller as president. 
1922 
Apr. 26 — Robbers at Elizabeth Last Wednesday — Hoskins 

Lumber Office and Garage entered; Ford car stolen, 

but recovered. Little loot obtained. 
May 31 — Logan & Vanderheyden Dissolve —The firm of 

Logan and Vanderheyden, proprietors of the Elizabeth 

Garage, dissolved partnership last week and Howard 

Vanderheyden assumes the business. 
Aug. 30 — Right-of-way for hard road through Woodbine 

township is secured. 
Sept. 27 — The old Blacksmith Shop of Sol Pearce's has 

been torn down and the foundation put in for the new 

shop. 
Nov. 15 — Vanderheyden & Gerkman have formed a 

company to be known as The Spotlight Sign Co. of 

Elizabeth and have installed a machine to show slides 

on a sign board constructed in front of the Elizabeth 

Garage. 
1926 

Don Clegg established general store. 
Mar. 3 — J. L. Graham is the new owner of the J. P. Eraser 

Co. Store. Mr. Graham invites the public to call and 

become acquainted. 
Mar. 17 — Elizabeth Takes Second in County Basketball 

Tournament. 
Aug. 18 — Elizabeth Community Dramatic Club presents 

"When a Feller Needs a Friend" at Bishops Opera 

House — Friday & Saturday. 
1927 
Feb. 1927 — Interstate Power Co. Purchased Elizabeth 

Light and Power. 
May 23 — Dr. A. T. Nadig and Laura Price killed in gas 

explosion at Nadig home. 



LOG CABIN 

'pute 'pood - ^oc^^tcUCi, 

SERVING A FEW THINGS 
SERVING THEM WELL 



CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR 100th ANNIVERSARY 
ELIZABETH. ILLINOIS 

Phone: 777-9743 Galena, Illinois 




"WE ARE STILL SELLING WINNERS" 

Wayman Cobine Farm Equipment 

AC N-H N-l KEWANEE OLIVER 

Elizabeth, Illinois Phone: 815-858-3811 



June 15 — Announcement that Dr. E. J. Wiley would 

practice here. 
1928 
Mar. 25 — D. R. Bullard and L. O. Graves, new owners of 

Elizabeth Garage, to rebuild and be open by May 10. 
Feb. 1 - Galena Cut Will Be Paved. 
Feb. 15 — John Gerkman installed radio at school so 

students could listen to New York Symphony Orchestra. 
Mar. 21 — School closed for purpose of checking influenza 

epidemic. 
Mar. 28 — Contract for Paving Route 78. 
Apr. 25 — Old Time Fiddlers Contest Packs Bishops Hall. 
May 30 — Bessie Duel!, who has taught at Terrapin Ridge 

for a number of years, has accepted a position at 

Esmond, 111. 

Soldiers and Sailors Reunion to be held at Bishops 

Opera House. 
Aug. 1 5 — Eighth Annual Elizabeth Fair to be Sept. 1 2 & 13. 
Aug. 22 — Surveyors at work on Route 80 this week. 
Sept. 5 — Dr. Wiley buys Dr. Denny practice. 
Sept. 12 — Possibility of 40 foot Highway from Chicago to 

Dubuque Soon. 
Sept. 26 — Ernest Haas purchased the Bryant property on 

West Main St. and will erect a new modern garage with 

sales room. To be brick structure. 
Oct. 17 — Greyhound Bus Service becomes Effective Oct. 12 

between Rockford and East Dubuque. 
Oct. 31 — Elizabeth to have Sewerage System. 
Nov. 7 — Hoover Wins in Nation 
1929 
Jan. 9 — Roy Armitage Wins Prizes on Poultry — Entry — a 

Pair of Partridge Plymouth Rock Chickens. 
Feb. 13 — V. J. Banter Resigns Farm Advisor Post. 
Feb. 13 — Two Little Girls Were Lost Monday Night 
Apr. 10 — H. R. Brunnemeyer Arrived to Begin Duties as 

Farm Advisor 
June 19 — Elizabeth Butter and Cheese Co. Plant Lose Ten 

Tubs of Butter — No Trace of Robbers 
June 26 — Sewer Project Nears Completion 
July 31 — Interstate Light and Power Co. Busy Setting 

Poles to Carry Electric Current to Woodbine 
Aug. 14 — Bishops Theater Will be Closed for Two Weeks 

— Next Show to be Aug. 30 
Sept. 1 1 — Harold Taft Declared Champion in Tennis 

Association in the final singles. The schedule in the 

couples has been considerably disrupted due to the 

weather, vacations and the like. 
Sept. 25 - World's Largest Hog Raised Near Elizabeth — O. 

J. Kehl & Son Owners. Hog weighed 1 135 lbs. 
Oct. 2 — W. J. McQuillen has decided to close out his entire 

stock of merchandise and retire. 
Oct. 9 — County Officers Raid Hanover Liquor Joints 
Oct. 9 - County W.C.T.U. Will Not Meet Here Tomorrow 
1930 
Mar. 5 — Elizabeth Independent Basketball Team won their 

last game on the seasons schedule, when they nosed 

out the Woodbine Independents 10 to 7. 
Mar. 12 — Route 80 Will go North from Hanover to Route 

5 near Elizabeth. 
Apr. 30 — Bishops Theater Announced That They Expect to 

Open With All Talking Pictures. New projection 

machines will be installed and Elizabeth will have 

talkies that compare favorably with cities much larger. 
May 14 — "Womanless Wedding" will be shown for the 

last time tonight. 63 member cast . All attendance 

records broken. 
Aug. 27 — Midnight fire damages Gable Bakery and 

Restaurant. 
Sept. 10 — Old Elizabeth Roller Mill Totally Destroyed by 

Fire. Built in 1842, was oldest building of its kind in 

this section of the state. 



Dec. 3 — Elizabeth to Dedicate New School addition on 
Dec. 10. State Superintendent of High Schools to Attend. 

1931 

Aug. 5 — Jo Daviess County 4H Dairy Team Wins first place 
in State Contest 

Sept. 9 ~ Public Gatherings in Elizabeth Banned— Churches 
and Schools Closed due to Infantile Paralysis 

Oct. 21 — Fire in Bishops Department Store Saturday. 
Destroys large amount of merchandise, fire gained 
headway before being discovered. 

Oct. 21 •— Elizabeth Citizens Want Fire Department 

1932 

Mar. 16 — The Newly Organized Fire Dept., and their new 
truck, answered their first alarm about 7:30 A.M. 
Monday for a chimney fire at the Riley Hitt home. 

May 18 — Citizens of Elizabeth township are determined 
to have better roads leading to Elizabeth, work is 
progressing rapidly on the road from town past the 
A. L. Ashmore farm. Gravel has been put on this 
stretch from the edge of town across the railroad tracks 
to the top of the hill. 

June 15 — Two Main Street dwellings, four cars and a 
heavy motor truck with trailer were damaged Sat. in 
a most spectacular accident. The heavy truck ran wild 
through the Main St. and struck the four cars on its 
way thru and came to stop when it ran into the homes 
of Mrs. Delia Laign and Mrs. Mary Goldsworthy. 

June 15 — The Elizabeth Exchange Bank did not open for 
business Monday Morning. At the directors meeting 
it was decided to close the bank for examination and 
adjustment. 

Nov. 2 — The F. F. Fischer Hardware Store in Woodbine was 
robbed Wed. night. Merchandise valued at between 
$400 and $500 was taken. 

Nov. 9 — Work was started on rebuilding the Oliver School 
which was destroyed by f re three weeks ago. 

Dec. 21 — The Elizabeth Golf Club will stage a Carnival and 
Dance on Dec. 29th according to the President of the 
Club, Dr. W. C. Eustice. 

Dec. 21 — Work has started on Cutting the Elizabeth Ice 
Supply on Apple River. Ice is reported to be seven to 
10 inches thick and of good quality. The ice is being 
cut up the river from the Georgetown Bridge. 

1934 

Jan. 10 — Plans Under Way For New Park Here. New Park 
to be on 10 acre tract of land formerly owned by Frank 
Eraser just west of the school. 

Jan. 10 — Elizabeth Boys Narrowly Escape Injury In Auto 
Accident. Harvey Fraser and Marshall Read were pinned 
beneath the truck they were driving while on their 
way to Sterling, where Harvey was to take the test to 
enter West Point Military Academy. 

Jan. 17 — Elizabeth— Hanover Centrals Merged. The Han- 
over telephone lines have been connected with the 
Elizabeth board since there were not enough patrons 
at that place to warrant the maintaining of an exchange. 
Jan. 17 — After nearly three months without a school 
building, because of a mysterious fire last Oct., the 
school children of the Weston district again have their 
own school house. Miss Genevieve Tippett is the 
teacher. 
Jan. 17 — Horse Drawn Vehicles Must Carry Lights 

Feb. 21 — New Low Bus Rates in Effect to Chicago, Round 

trip $3.75 
Mar. 21 — Old garage building which adjoins the town 
hall is being razed by Dr. W. C. Eustice so that he may 
beautify the grounds with garden and shrubs. 

1935 

Jan. 2 — The reservior was completely relined with brick, 

relief workers doing the job. 
Sept. — Jack and Maude Brooks shows are in town. 



Hanover Volunteer Fire Dept. 




HANOVER, ILL 




VANCO 

PRINTERS 

115 N. GALENA AVE. 
FREEPORT, ILLINOIS 



'T^^^^CfS 



1937 

Nov. 4 — A new front has been constructed on the City 

Hall here, and when the large door for the fire station 

division, of the former Elizabeth Exchange bank, arrives, 

the work of remodeling will near completion. 
Dec. 9 — The Jo Daviess County Shipping Association of 

Elizabeth, with Francis Kevern as manager, had a record 

volume of business during the 12 months ending 

Nov. 30th. 
Dec. 30 —Over 100 graduates and their guests attended 

the annual school reunion. Mrs. Harold Taft was elected 

president. 
Dec. 30 — Homer Kearnaghan arrives to start duties as Jo 

Daviess Farm Advisor. 
1938 
Jan. 27 — Elizabeth Taxpayers to get cut of 17c per $100 

valuation on 1937 tax bills. 

Corporation tax down 51 cents in last two years report 

states. 
Feb. 17 — Dollar Day— Special Bargain Day to be held in 

Elizabeth Sat. Special prices in effect in practically 

every store. 
Feb. 24 — The Home Bureau's Second Annual Play Day will 

be held on March 17th in Bishop's Hall. 
Apr. 28 — Ira Shaw Observes 32 Anniversary of Business. 

Has drug and jewelry business. 
May 19 — The graduating class of 1938 will wear caps and 

gowns for the first time in several years. 
Oct. 5 — The High school band will give a carnival to be 

part of the drive to relieve band members of cost of 

organization. 
1949 
Jan. 5 — Farm Bureau Offices are moved to the new 

agricultural building. 
Jan. 26 — Locker Plant Stockholders hold f rst annal meeting. 
Mar. 2 — Elizabeth High School Wins District Tournament. 
Mar. 16 — Lions Club is sponsoring a whiskers contest. $15 

prize for the longest beard and $15 for the fanciest 

beard. 
May 4 — Elizabeth's New Bridge Uncertain Possibility. 
June 15 — Howard Breed has the honor of bringing the 

first television to town. It is not perfect but local people 

are invited to watch it in Breed's Electric Shop. WTMJ, 

Milwaukee, is the only channel coming in. 
July 23 — Elizabeth's Fire Bell will no longer stand as a 

landmark, it must come down to make room for more 

modern methods. Had served community for 52 years. 
Oct. — High School accepts auto for first Driver's Training 

Course to be offered to students. A. E. Cockrum is 

superintendent; and Fred Pratt, member of faculty will 

instruct the course. 
Oct. — Elizabeth has its first Electrically Heated Home. It 

is the new residence erected by Mrs. Hannah Daniel. 
Nov. 9 — Library moved to its new quarters in the Elizabeth 

State Bank bidg. from the former quarters in the 

Goldsworthy bIdg. 

Nov. 30 — Carl Schnitzler named III. State Champion Corn 

grower. Yield — 170 bushels per acre. 
Nov. 30 — Announcing the wonderful new Pontiac. Ready 

to drive $1742. 

Nov. 1949 - CofFee 2 lbs. $1.37, Cigarettes, all brands 
$1.69 carton. Raisins 17c lb.. Bacon 48c lb. 

1950 

Oct. 25 — "Old Maud", Elizabeth's oldest Automobile, a 
191 1 Ford car owned by W. C. T. Linger, sold. 

1951 

Feb. 21 - Best oats sold for $1 .39, other oats $1 .09 

May 30 — Laying of corner stone for the new St. Paul's 
Lutheran Church. 



1952 

Apr. 16 — Spotlight Food Mart has third Anniversary; sugar 

10 lbs. 85c, cofFee 87c lb. and ground beef 59c lb. 
Apr. 30 — Notice — Please Use New Dumping Ground. 

Follow road through park to 4H building, dump refuse 

over bank, (signed) Village Board. 
June 25 — All-stars meet McConnell at Baseball Sunday. 
July 2 — School District 36 Extinct; now its Community Unit 

District. 
July 30 — Greier's Recreation now open for business. 
Aug. 13 — Crowds fill streets for Annual Fair Parade. 
1953 

Sept. 9 — Ground breaking for new fire station. 
Sept. 9 — Truck load of bears marooned here Thursday. 

They were enroute to Washington state. 
Oct. 28 — Two Elizabeth Rural schools sold, Allen school 

sold for $500. 
Dec. 23 — Hotel closes after 59 years of service, built 1894. 
1954 

Jan. 6 — School cafeteria to open Jan. 18, Hodge announces. 
Feb. 3 — Terps Cop County Title at East Dubuque 
Apr. 14 — Hutchison Elected Sheriff 
May 12 — City Tax Rate slightly Higher 
May 26 — C. W. Banwarth Retires, Chapel sold to Charles 

Nadig 
June 9 — Elizabeth Community Club Organizes Thursday 

night. 
Aug. 25 — Betsy 4H Club enjoys Chicago Trip 
Dec. 29 — New Street Lights are being installed. 
1955 
Jan. 5 — Helen Ertmer & Gloria Endress take over operation 

of Clover Farm store from Murnice Breed. 
Apr. 13 — First and second graders get Salk Vaccine. 
June 15 — Fischer Bros, to build new store and warehouse. 
June 22 — Area schools go on Auction Block, eight schools 

average $1000. 

Grocery Buys — Milk 59c gal., ground beef 39c lb. 
Sept. 30 — Stans Supermarket observes Silver Anniversary 
1956 
May 2 — Work begun on New Entrance to St. Mary's 

Cemetery. 
Aug. 8 — New cattle barn, at Fair Grounds, ready for use 

at the Community Fair. 
Aug. 12 — Passenger service on the C. G. W. will be dis- 
continued after nearly 70 years of service. 
1957 
Mar. 13 — Grass fires plague Elizabeth Fire Dept. because 

of lack of snow this winter. 
May 8 — Band wins Superior Rating in State Contest. 
May 29 — Wayman Cobine purchases farm equipment 

business from Jack Schwirtz. Will locate in Greier build- 
ing on Myrtle Street. 
Oct. 30 — Community Halloween Party Wed. night. 
Nov. 6 — Merchants sponsor Bargain Carnival. 
Nov. 6 — Sewer Extension to Greier addition nears 

completion. 
Nov. 27 — Wes Holly to be here for Kiddies Yule Treat. 
Oec. 4 — 1897 & 1907 Alumni Honored at Annual School 

meeting. 
Dec. 1 1 — Voters approve bonds for school addition, to 

include new gym, home ec. room, library and new 

heating plant. 
1958 
Feb. 19 — Business Houses Close for Funeral of O. M. 

Bishop, Elizabeth's oldest business man. 
Mar. 26 — Lions plan dinner honoring Terrapins. 
Apr. 9 — Grebner Wins Sheriff Race. 

May 21 — Raymond Thom Named District 208 Super- 
intendent. 
May 28 — Parents of Seniors Sponsor Traveling Euchre Party. 




GARY L SAAM 
Construction Co. 



T. D. SHEEAN 

EARTHMOVING 



Operator 

GRADING 



Phone: 
845-2412 



No job too Large or too Small 



FREE ESTIMATES 



SCALES MOUND, ILL 



Phone: 
845-2427 



Sears 



FREEPORT SHOPPING CENTER 
233-3141 Free Parking 



COMPLIMENTS OF SEARS, ROEBUCK AND CO. 
MANAGEMENT AND EMPLOYEES 

SHOP AT SEARS AND SAVE 
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Monday, Noon to 9:00 P.M. 

Tuesday - Wednesday - Thursday - Friday-9:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. 

Saturday, 9:00 A.M. to 5:30 P.M. 



Sears 



SEARS. ROEBUCK AND CO. 



May 28 — Tax Rate Higher This Year 

June 25 — Hoskins Lumber Co. has Grand Opening of New 

Office and Warehouse. 
July 30 — Postage will cost more, first class letter to be 4c 
July 30 — Logan's Variety Sold to Harry Abbotts. 
Aug. 6 — Final Band Concert for this season to be Saturday. 
1958 

Sept. 3 — Annual Bethel School Reunion to be Monday. 
Sept. 10 — Contracts let for New High School 
Oct, 15 — Lee Beyer Wins State Corn Picking Title for one 

row pickers. 
Oct. 15 — Dr. Schlecht to locate here, Medical Center to be 

built. 
Nov. 26 — Last chance to look at the rocket of Russia's 

Sputnik III will be Wed. night according to LeRoy 

Groezinger. 
1959 
Feb. 18 — Georgetown Bridge Replacement is part of '59 

Construction work. Will not be built at present location. 
June 24 — Medical Center Open House.'to be Sunday. 
July 8 — Breed's Sales Barn to mark Grand Opening July 

15th. The new building 146 ft. long, will seat 300 

people. 
Oct. 28 — State Bank Observes Golden Anniversary 
Nov. 4 — Schools to Observe Education Week with Open 

House. 
Nov. 1 1 — Kindergarten Class Opens Monday. 
1960 

Jan. 13 — Terps Host, Win County Tourney 
Feb. 3 — Watch Where, How Long you Park, Village Fathers 

Warn. 
Mar. 23 — Michael Fine Today after drinking cleaning fluid 
Apr. 27 — Voters to Hear Need for Road Bond 
May 25 — Elizabeth's population 728 for village, 1186 in 

township. 
June 8 — Seniors return from New York Trip 
Sept. 7 — Residents Warned to Cut Noxious Weeds Im- 
mediately 
Oct. 12 - New Post Office Authorized for Elizabeth 
1961 
May 16 — Marie Van de Drink has Modernized her Beauty 

Shop. 
May 24 — "I'd Choose Teaching Again" says Frost Wand 

on retiring. 
June 21 — Work of Building New Post Office has begun. 
July 26 — 41st Fair and 4H Show Opens Aug. 3 
Aug. 1 — Break In Reported at Shuemakers 
Nov. 1 — Post Offiice Open for Business in New Building 
Nov. 8 - Read's Hdwe. Marks 50th Year 
Nov. 22 — Backenkellar Buys Read's Hardware. 
1962 
June 9 — Dedication Ceremony and Open House at New 

Post Office 
Oct. 10 — New Business Started — Thermogas Liquidfied 

gas plant 
Oct. 24 - Hey, Kids! Saturday's the Halloween Party 
Nov. 21 — Foundation Laid for Dial Phone Building 
1963 

Jan. 23 — Seniors Sponsor Card Party and Cake Mixer 
Feb. 6 — Local Barber Wins Community Cake Decorating 

Contest 
Feb. 6 — Dr. Oberheim Honored for 50 years Practice 
Feb. 13 — Tuckers Purchase Schmidt Cafe 
Apr. 10 — Berlage to Open John Deere Business 
May 22 — Elizabeth High to Graduate Largest Class 
May 29 — Mrs. Wm. Knauer Buys Restaurant from Eugene 

Krugs. 
June 19 - Elizabeth's Zip Code is 61028 
Nov. 13 — Dial System Becomes Effective Nov. 12 
Dec. 5 - Elizabeth's New $100,000 Bridge Opened 

Nov. 30th 



1964 

June — Seven children attended the first Day Care Center 

program for mentally retarded children. 
July 4 — At exactly 1 P.M. all Elizabeth bells will be rung 

for four minutes, thus taking part in the national "Let 

Freedom Ring" project. 
July 15 — Veterinary Office building, to be occupied by Dr. 

D. E. Smith, was started last week. 
Aug. 30 — The new Nadig Funeral Home will have its 

Open House on August 30. 
Nov. 1 1 — Ken and Fritz Eichman are the new operators of 

the E & E Processing Service. 
Nov. — Elizabeth's F. F. A. Chapter received the Illinois 

Bankers award for being the outstanding chapter in 

nothwestern Illinois. 
Dec. — The J & M Motel is the first motel in this area to be 

heated with electric heat. 
1965 
Feb. 6 — The Ski Jumping Tournament scheduled for last 

month will be Saturday. It will feature John Balfanz 

and other noted skiers. 
1966 
May 10 — "Someday", Grand Champion steer shown in 

lobby of State Bank. Weighs 1040 lbs. 
May 25 — New Illinois Law Concerning Care of Dumps 

Discussed 
June 22 - F. F. A. Wins Honors at State Meet 
Sept. 14 — Ground beef 55c lb., sugar 10 lbs. $1.11, 

coffee 2 lbs. $1.39 
1967 
Oct. — The First Session of a School of Christian Unity was 

held Sunday. St. Mary's and Methodist churches will be 

participating in this ecumenical study venture. 
Oct. — Joanne Fischer to represent Illinois in the Miss Rodeo 

America Contest at Las Vegas, Nev. 
Oct. 25 — The Junior Class, of Elizabeth High School, is 

selling "Soap and Waxed Window Insurance." 
Nov. 29 — Work Begins on Nursing Home 
1968 
Jan. — Jan. 31st to Mark Village Dump Closing. The first 

garbage collection will be Feb. 1st. 
Feb. 7 — New Garbage collection is in second week. 
Mar. 6 — Due to Extremely Dry Conditions the Fire Dept. 

Requests there be no burning outdoors. Extension offices 

to locate here. 
Mar. 13 — Jeff Walker Designs Centennial Seal 
Mar. 20 — Woodbine Feed Mill Leveled by Fire 




COMPLIMENTS OF 



JO DAVIESS COUNTY 
FARM BUREAU 

Serving You Since 1919 




IN 

LEGISLATION - MARKETING 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

FOR AGRICULTURE 



STOCKTON 
COOPERATIVE 
ASSOCIATION 




COAL - SEED 
GRAIN - FEED 

LEO BARTELS, Mgr. 
Stockton, III. Ph. 947-2315 



ALBRECHT CONSTRUCTION 




BISHOPS BUSY 
BIG STORE 



New Construction — Cabinet Work 

Repairs — Masonry 

Remodeling — Farm Buildings 

GLEN ALBRECHT 

Route 2 - Elizabeth, III. 

Phone: 858-2285 



Serving Elizabeth, III. for 63 years 

with America's Finest Name Brands 

at Reasonable Prices 

Clothing — Shoes — Meats — Groceries 

IRWIN O. BISHOP 



PROLOGUE 
An Original Poem by Mrs. Mabel Hood 

There is a tale to tell, a Past, recall, 

A Time beyond the memory of us all. 

When in this very land where we now dwell. 

Only the roving Indian knew it well. 

Here roamed the Sacs, the Foxes, Winnebagoes 

Mascoutins, Chippewas, Kickapoo, bold Mohegans, 

Far to the East the dreaded Iroquois, 

South the Miamis and the Illinois. 

Filled was the land with plenty for their take. 

Game in the forest, fishes in the lake. 

Clear ran the rivers flowing to the sea. 

Lush the wild grasses blowing rich and free. 

Lovely the hills rose crowned with noble trees, 

Fertile, the valley; cool, the western breeze. 

Bounty enough for all the redskins' needs. 

Food to his liking, weapons for his deeds. 

Thickets of plums, and tangles of blackberries 

Pumpkins, maize, beans in summer gardens grew. 

Wild rice, roots, honey— all the winter through; 

Strawberries, gooseberries, elder, and wild cherries; 

Garments of deerskins, robes of buffalo hides, 

Furs of fox, beaver, wolf, and mink besides; 

All the Great Father in his grace supplied. 

Loved his red children, kept them satisfied. 

Now came the trader, voyageur, and priest. 

Looking for furs, new lands, and wealth increased. 

LaSalle, Ribourde, Tonty, Joliet; 

Dubuque, Hennepin, Membre, and brave Marquette. 

The Jesuits taught the Savage, ways of peace. 

Preached that cruel massacres and wars must cease. 

English succeeded French, and after them 

The Thirteen States claimed sovereignty. Bold men 

Harnessed the rivers, cut the great trees, broke sod. 

Conquered the land. And with the men of God 

Rode scattered circuits; brought to the pioneers 

Hope, consolation, sympathy for their fears. 

Prayers for their dead, and faith that come what might 

God in His mercy doeth all things right. 



SOME FIRSTS IN ELIZABETH 

First Streets— Laid out in 1839 

First Electricity-1907 

First Railroad-Aug. 1, 1887 

First Cement Sidewalks— 1 907 

First Church-Methodist 1845-1846 

First Marriage— Jane Murdock & Jefferson Clark 

First Death-John Gray 1832 

First Birth— Martha & Theodore Winters 

children of John D. Winters 
First Newspaper— Ben Terry 1861 
First Street Lights— Kerosene Before 1887 

Electric 1914 

Mercury Vapor Dec. 29, 1954 
First Mayor-J. H. Bateman 1887 
First Postmaster-Wm. Boutwell 1847 
First Doctor-E. W. Beebe 1862 
First Car Owner— Dave Haig — High Wheels 

Jim Gundry — Hard Rubber tires 

Elmer Goldthorpe (1909-1910) 
First Store Keeper— James B. Watts & Samuel Nye 

(before 1841) 
First Hotel— Union Hotel — Thomas B. Shaw, Prop. 
First Blacksmith— Pearce Shop site 
First Mill Proprietor-Isaac Horr & Mr. Smith - 1842 
First Bank— Elizabeth Exchange Bank 

A. H. Nash - Sept. 1888 
First Water Works-1902 
First School— Before 1861 — Present site of 

Edmund Fischer home 
First Telephone-1 902-1 903 

Nov. 12, 1963 - Dial phone 
First Street Signs— May 1963 
First House Numbers— May 1963 
First Bridge-Around 1887 

Nov. 30, 1960 — New Cement Bridge 



Notes from a diary and account book of 
J. W. Prisk kept from 1894-1926 



5-28-1895 New corn planter (Hayes) and a new riding corn 

plow J. I.e. bought 
4-15-1904 Telephone put in 
5-26-1909 Earthquake 

12-31-1913 Bought new single seats for Bethel School 
6-3-1914 Sowed alfalfa in corn before last plowing 
2-22-1926 Frazier's store sold to Graham 
1-27-1915 County quarantined foot and mouth 
4-1 4-1 91 5 Used auto first time season 

8-29-1894 Sold to McKenzie and Gault-20 cattle-$l 000.00 
1 1-21-1894 Sold to Abe Cox, Elizabeth-80 chickens-$l 2.40 
12-1-1894 Bought 510 bushels of corn - 40 cents per bu. 

$204.00 
12-19-1894 Sold to Abe Cox, Elizabeth - 3 turkeys 5 cents 

per lb. -$2.75 
2-12-1895 Bought 4 steers - $64.40 

11-13-1895 Sold Chicago 18 steers-23,870 lbs. -$901. 70 
11-27-1895 Sold one quarter dress beef- 72 lbs. - $2.88 
2-22-1898 11 hogs 17,950 lbs. weighed at home 
2-22-1898 11 hogs, 17,600 lbs. weighed at Woodbine 

$3.80 per cwt. 



2-23-1898 77 hogs, 17,460 lbs. weighed at Chicago 

4.05 per cwt. expenses $40. $667.99 

1898 1100 lb. Horse $37.45 
12-2-1899 Weighed 32 feeder hogs Average weight 

1511/2 lbs. 
1-2-1900 Weighed 32 feeder hogs Average weight 

222 lbs. 
2-2-1900 Weighed 31 feeder hogs Average weight 

262 lbs. 
2-5-1900 Sold 30 feeder hogs Average weight 266 lbs. 

Hogs on feed 2 months 
Cattle Contract: Sold March 10, 1902-20 head of steers 
at $4.85 per hundred to be delivered May 1 —weighed at 
home at eleven o'clock and shrunk three per cent. 
9-15-1 1-28-1906 Three months of wages $192.00 
Mr. Prisk was the grandfather of Murnice Dittmar, on whose 
farm they are now living. Their children are the sixth 
generation to live there. The original farm for which they 
have the land grant given under President Polk has never 
been sold. 



BILL'S 



ROYAL BLUE 



Owned & Operated by BILL WOLTER 

THE STORE WHERE YOU SAVE TWO WAYS 
PRICE & GIFT HOUSE STAMPS 

Hanover, Illinois 




FISCHER'S 

Plumbing & Heating 
Air Conditioning 



Water Systems 



PHONE: 858-3323 



ELIZABETH, ILLINOIS 



JAMES B. VINCENT 
ROBERT R. ROTH 



Attorneys 



Galena, Illinois 



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FORD 



ADAM'S GARAGE 

YOUR FRIENDLY FORD DEALER 

HANOVER, ILLINOIS 

DIAL 591-2296 




CONGRATULATIONS ELIZABETH 

J. & M. MOTEL 

3 Miles East on 20 
ELIZABETH, ILLINOIS 

T.V. - AIR CONDITIONED 

TUB OR SHOWER - ELECTRIC HEAT 

LAUNDROMAT 

Phone: 815-858-2233 



CONGRATULATIONS 

on your 

Promotion and Publication 

of the 

HISTORY OF ELIZABETH 

FOR YOUR CENTENNIAL 

OBSERVANCE 

JO DAVIESS COUNTY 
SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT 



CONGRATULATIONS 
ELIZABETH CENTENNIAL 




E and E PROCESSING 

ELIZABETH, ILLINOIS 
PHONE: 858-3318 

Complete Meat Processing 

Home-Killed Meats For Sale 



Eliminate Costly Spraying — Dipping 



BY USING AMERICA'S ORIGINAL & BEST 

QUSevateh 



CATTLE OILER - DELOUSER 



BULLS FOR SALE OR RENT 



Specializing in Angus and Hereford 



UWRENCE MITCHELL 



Elizabeth, III. 



Phone: 858-3674 



GREAT PLAINS 
SUPPLY COMPANY 

YOUR COMPLETE 

BUILDING MATERIAL 

HEADQUARTERS 

LUMBER - MILLWORK - HARDWARE 

PLUMBING FIXTURES - LIGHT FIXTURES 

CARPETING - KITCHEN CABINETS 

COMPLETE CONTRACTING SERVICE 

Free Delivery — Free Estimates — Financing 

HANOVER, ILL. 

Ph. 591-3311 PAUL MICHAEL, Mgr. 



BEST WISHES FOR ELIZABETH'S 
CENTENNIAL 



MARIE'S BEAUTY SHOP 



WHERE BEAUTY IS OUR BUSINESS 



ALL SERVICES CALL 858-3717 




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COMPLIMENTS OF 

DR. B. T. HUSO 

STOCKTON SKELGAS 

GRIMM'S DAIRY 

STOCKTON SCOOP 

WICKES LUMBER & 
BUILDING SUPPLY 



STEVE'S MOBIL SERVICE 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


ELIZABETH, ILLINOIS 


Sears, Roebuck and Co. 


Phones: 858-9871 or 858-3319 


Dubuqueland's Most Complete 


REPAIRS - ACCESSORIES 


Department Store 


BATTERIES 






300 S. Locust St. Dubuque, Iowa 


GENERAL TRUCKING 






PHONE: 588-2051 


Limestone Gravel 




TRAUSCH BAKING CO. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


Bakers of 


BETTY'S VARIETY STORE 




ELIZABETH, ILLINOIS 


SUNBEAM 




and 


NOTIONS - GREETING CARDS 


HILLBILLY 


TOYS - DISHES 


BREAD 


Betty Jean Albrecht, Owner 



GAMBLE STORE 


TERRAPIN RIDGE MANOR 


ELIZABETH 858-3610 




Hardware for Hard Wear 


Motel & Supper Club 


Housewares for Her 


SERVING 


Paint for the House 


Breakfast — Lunch 


Automotive for the Car 


Dinner — Cocktails 


Sporting Goods for the Family 


PHONE: 815-858-3629 


Wheel Horse Tractors 




for the Yard 


ELIZABETH, ILLINOIS 


HELEN'S GROCERY 


BRIARBROOK GIFT SHOP 

TERRAPIN RIDGE 




Gifts — Antiques 


A STORE COMPLETE, 
FULL OF GOOD THINGS TO EAT 


Knitting Supplies 




ON OUR 10th ANNIVERSARY 




WE SALUTE 


PHONE: 858-3710 


ELIZABETH'S 100th BIRTHDAY 


ELIZABETH, ILLINOIS 


CLARENCE & RUTH WILSON 




Elizabeth, III. Ph. 858-3770 



PHONE: 947-3916 

Stockton Floral & Nursery 

STOCKTON, ILLINOIS 

NURSERY STOCK - GARDEN PLANTS 

FRESH FLOWERS - BLOOMING PLANTS - GIFTS 

JACK TOWNSEND DON HUDSON 


McNett Chevrolet-Buick, Inc. 
Stockton-Warren Area Dealer 


CONGRATULATIONS 
ON YOUR 100th BIRTHDAY 

Compliments of 

THE LANTERN 

Meals With Truly A Home-Cooked Flavor 
Jet. 20-78 - Stockton, III. 


Masters - Harrison Agency 

Real Estate --- Insurance 

Stockton, Illinois 


Kappes Standard Service 

COMPLETE CAR CARE 

BOLENS TRACTORS 

AAA - CMC - AOMC 

947-3915 Stockton, Illinois 


BOYLE DAIRY SUPPLY 

Muller Bulk Coolers 

Complete line of DeLaval Dairy Equipment 

Store 947-2217 - House 947-3803 

STOCKTON, ILLINOIS 


HOTZE'S 

Allied Farm Equipment 
Stockton, Illinois 


GALLENTINE JEWELRY 

Stockton, Illinois 

WATCH & CLOCK REPAIR 

Authorized Dealer for Bulova, Elgin and Speidel 

PHONE: 947-2513 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

HAROLD NAGEL 
Stockton, Illinois 


Better Wear for those who Care 

TYSON'S FASHIONETTE 

Mrs. Effie Tyson 

Elizabeth, III. 


MAC'S RESTAURANT 

COUNTRY STYLE COOKING 

Homemade Pies — Rolls and Bread 

Short Orders — Fountain Service 

Phone: 858-9872 Elizabeth, III. 


SAAM'S SERVICE 

Conoco Gas and Fuel Oil 

Grease and Lubricants 

Tires and Batteries 

Phones: Off. 845-2412 - Res. 845-2427 

Scales Mound, III. 


ELIZABETH BARBER SHOP 

JOHN & JACK 
A good team (of mules) 


5 YEARS OUT OF 100 

WE HOPE TO BE AROUND 

MANY MORE 

SERVING FINE FOODS 

Tucker's Restaurant 

Cecile & Harry 
Elizabeth, Illinois 


Elizabeth Electric Service 

R.C.A. TELEVISION - STEREO 
ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 


CONGRATULATIONS 

MESSING & BECKER 

Sporting Goods 

22 S. CHICAGO AVE. 
232-0614 FREEPORT, ILL. 



WILCA SPRING FARM 


BRUNSWICK INN 


Registered Holsteins 


Savanna's Home of Broasted Chicken 


James Berlage 


Family Style & Carry-out Orders 


Elizabeth, Illinois 


402 Main St. Phone: 273-9020 


BOB'S CLEANERS 


FRANK J. LIEB 


"We're Right on the Spot" 


GENERAL CONTRACTOR 
IN CONCRETE WORK 


Stockton, III. Phone: 947-3614 


Wood and Metal Erection 
Elizabeth, III. Phone: 858-3638 


GREIER INSURANCE AGENCY 


Gerlich's Conoco Service 


COMPLETE INSURANCE SERVICE 
FOR TOWN & COUNTRY 


ABE GERLICH, Owner 

Fuel Oil — Gasoline 

Diesel Oils — Motor Oils 


Phone: 858-2213 
ELIZABETH, ILLINOIS 


Farm and Home Delivery 

DIAL 858-3416 OR 591-3613 

IF NO ANSWER - DIAL 858-3644 




COMPLIMENTS OF 


Bob Larry 


SCHMIDT TV SERVICE 


CHUMBLERS DOGGY MOTEL 


George & Jenny Schmidt 


Elizabeth, Ml. Phone: 858-3693 


Elizabeth, Illinois 



ABE DITTMAR & SONS 

Petroleum Products 
Mechanical Service 
WOODBINE, ILLINOIS 





Phone: 947-3401 



BEAUTY SALON 

120 S. Main St. 

Stockton, III. 



"Professional Care 
is Best for the Hair" 




OSTERDAY ELECTRIC 

G.E. Electric Comfort Heating Equipment 

Hagan Super-R Insulation 

Service & Wiring — Mautz Paint 

Stockton, III. Phone: 947-2117 




BERLAGE IMPLEMENT 



Elizabeth, Illinois 



Phone: 858-3880 



CHOOSE FROM THE LONG GREEN LINE 
OF JOHN DEERE EQUIPMENT 

SALES & SERVICE 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Esmond's Dairy Products, Inc. 

Distributor of 

DEAN'S ^.j^t^^^^*-^ MILK 

Phone: 369-4312 Lena, Illinois 




PRODUCTS 



Chuck's Service Station 

Charles Potter, Mgr. 

Elizabeth, Illinois Phone: 858-3410 



PETE'S 
STEAKBURGER INN 



LANE VIEW POULTRY FARMS 



PHONE YOUR ORDER 

OR COME IN Home Made Pi( 




HOME COOKING 

PLATE LUNCHES 

SHORT ORDERS 

BREAKFAST SERVED ANY TIME 




777-9720 



206 S. MAIN 



GALENA 



Profit Pullets 



DAY OLD and STARTED CHICKS 

16 to 22 WEEK OLD PULLETS 

DeKALB XL-45 SEED 

CLARENCE STOUFFER, Mgr. 

Waddams Grove, III. 
815/369-4108 



LENA SALES, INC. 

BADGER DEALER 
MADISON SILOS 
SILO UNLOADERS 
BARN CLEANERS 
AUTOAAATIC FEEDERS 
FREE ESTIMATES 

LONG GRAIN BINS AND DRYERS 
FROM 1,000 TO 100,000 BUSHELS 

ROBERT HERMAN - 369-2227 
VIRGIL BRINKMEIER - 369-4091 

Located at R. WILKENING SALES 
PARTS and SERVICE 

Phone: 369-4567 



ANOTHER 

PROSPEROUS 

100 YEARS 



ELIZABETH PHARMACY 



SULLIVAN'S 

HARDWARE 
APPLIANCE 
FURNITURE 

Phone: 591-2216 
HANOVER, ILLINOIS 



Only your IDS man 

can offer you these four 

Investors Mutual Funds: 

INVESTORS STOCK FUND 

INVESTORS VARIABLE PAYMENT FUND 

INVESTORS MUTUAL 

INVESTORS SELECTIVE FUND 

Call for free prospectuses: 

WILLIAM 
BANWARTH 

Zone Manager 

254 West Maple Stockton 

Phone: 947-3632 



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Investors Diversified Services, Inc. 
Founded 1894 




U. S. POST OFFICE 

ELIZABETH, ILLINOIS 

Richard C. Hazer, Postmaster 

Robert J. Ertmer, Clerk 

Rodger S. Selleck, Clerk 

Wyla A. Fischer, Clerk 

Charles H. Niemeyer, Rural Carrier 

Emmett A. Murray, Rural Carrier 




COMPLIMENTS OF 



DR. DONALD E. SMITH 
VETERINARIAN 

Elizabeth, Illinois 



CONGRATULATIONS & BEST WISHES 
TO ELIZABETH'S 100th BIRTHDAY 



^CHRYSLER 

^Mr MOTORS CORPORATION 



ZEAL'S SERVICE GARAGE 

Chrysler — Dodge — Plymouth 
Dodge Truck 

HANOVER, ILLINOIS 

24 Hr. Wrecker Service 




Mr. & Mrs. LeRoy J. Groezinger & John Leslie 

Your Friendly McKay Representative 
from Wisconsin's Greatest Nursery 

Donors of 10 Centennial Trees 

Planted in the Village Park 

for Future Elizabethans to 

appreciate and enjoy 



Joe's Cock & Bull Tavern 

JOSEPH LUDOIS, Owner 

"Where the Intellectuals Foregather" 

Phone: 947-9882 Stockton, Illinois 


BRING ALL THE FAMILY 
TO THE 

Stockton Bowling Lanes 

"ENJOY BOWLING AT ANY AGE" 

102 S. Ward St. 

Stockton, Illinois Phone: 947-3616 


STOCKTON -ATWOOD 

Community Golf Course 

STOCKTON, ILLINOIS 

Memberships and Green Fees 

Phone: 947-9876 


CARGILL SEED CORN 

Fred Huttenlocker 
Stockton, Illinois 


INTERSTATE PRODUCERS 
LIVESTOCK ASSOCIATION 

CATTLE & CALVES BOUGHT WEDNESDAYS 
HOGS - MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 

"Under Same Management" 
S VinP, EliTahpth, III 858.3316 

Railroad St., Apple River, III. 594-2415 
If No Answer Elizabeth 858-3330 


Heidenreich Construction 

MASON & GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

ELDON HEIDENREICH, Owner 

228 West Main Elizabeth, III. 

Telephone: 858-3858 

New Construction, Repair & Remodeling 

FARMS - HOMES - INDUSTRY 


COMPLIMENTS 

STAMPFER'S 

Dubuque, Iowa 


L T. OBERHEIM, D.V.M. 

Phone: 858-3622 
ELIZABETH, ILLINOIS 



Compliments of 

Walters Antenna Service 
Elizabeth, Illinois 


MITCHELL'S CAFE 

HANOVER 

Meals — Sandwiches — Sundaes — Sodas 
Try Our "Mitchell Burger" 


HAPPY ANNIVERSARY 

COLAN EVERSOLL 
JOHN EVERSOLL 

General Contractors 


Compliments of 

Dr. Ralph E. Speer, M.D. 

To Elizabeth on their 100th Year 

HANOVER, ILLINOIS 


SCHAPVILLE GARAGE 

Elizabeth, III. Phone-Scales Mound 845-2580 

HOMELITE CHAIN SAWS 
LAWN-BOY MOWERS 

Where Service Comes First 


Compliments of 

Story Brook Country Club 

HANOVER, ILLINOIS 

Phone: 591-3414 

Play Golf 
"The Game of a Lifetime" 


Gray-McCormick Agency 

The Agency of Service 

Phone: 591-2223 Hanover, III. 


Complete Planning Service 

Construction Service 
Ready-Mix Concrete 
Delivery Service 

SPAHN & ROSE LUMBER CO. 

Stockton, III. 947-2511 




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PROGRAM OF EVENTS 



May 4—11 a.m. Antique Car Parade 

12 noon Chicken Bar-B-Que 

Afternoon — Pioneer Craft Day 

8 p.m. Square Dance 
May 5 — Afternoon — Muzzle loading rifle shoot 
June 4 — 9 p.m. Centennial Ball (Russ Carlyle Orchestra) 
June 30 — 2:30 p.m. Antique Style Show and Tea 
July 4 — Kids Day and Old Fashioned Picnic 
July 5-6 — Pageant 

July 27 — Cub and Boy Scouts Country Auction 
Sept. 6 — Boy Scout Camparee 
Sept. 7 — Elizabeth Fair and Centennial Parade 

12 noon Chicken Bar-B-Que 
Sept. 6, 7, 8 — FlrTat^o*"- "" immunity Fair 





CENTENNIAL COMMITTEE 

John Eversoll— President, Glen Shaw, Jr.— Vice President, 
Mrs. John Eversoll— Secretary, Mrs. Lloyd McCa II— Treasurer 



PRESENTATION OF AWARD 

Stanley Goldthorpe presenting bond to Jeff Walker for 
the winning seal. 



And finally, once again — our heartfelt thanks to our 
many, many helpers who gave so unstintingly of their 
time, effort and knowledge, to the many people who loaned 
pictures, gave bits of information, and helped in anyway, 
it is impossible to name them all. 

A very special thank you to the person who wishes to 
remain anonymous, who so willingly gave of his time and 
talent to help us in the writing of the history of Elizabeth, 
"So The Story Goes" 

Last but not least, we wish to thank the many adver- 
tisers for their wonderful cooperation, without whose help 
this book would not have been possible. 

THE COMMITTEE 

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Krohmer 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Tippett 

Faye Heidenreich 

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Breed 

Alma Becker 

Lucille Becker 

Mr. and Mrs. Orville Zilly 

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Trost 

Mr. and Mrs. Gus Haas 

Roger Eichman 

Tom Virtye 



Primed May. 1968 
Vanco Primers 
Freeport, Illinois 

b5